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World fish production

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World fish production

Fish are harvested through commercial fishing and aquaculture.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the world harvest in 2005 consisted of 93.2 million tonnes captured by commercial fishing in wild fisheries, plus 48.1 million tonnes produced by fish farms. In addition, 1.3 million tons of aquatic plants (seaweed etc.) were captured in wild fisheries and 14.8 million tons were produced by aquaculture.[2] The number of individual fish caught in the wild has been estimated at 0.97-2.7 trillion per year (not counting fish farms or marine invertebrates).[3]

Marine and inland fisheries

World capture production 2007 in thousands of tonnes[4]
Inland fisheries Marine fisheries Totals
Freshwater fish 8,695 23 8,718
Diadromous fish 341 1,444 1,785
Marine fishes 82 65,627 65,709
Crustaceans 474 5,367 5,840
Molluscs 383 7,182 7,564
Other 61 388 449
Totals 10,035 80,029 90,064

Capture production by species

The following table shows the capture production by groups of species (fish, crustaceans, molluscs, etc.) in tonnes.

Capture production by groups of species in tonnes
Type Group 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
freshwater fish Carps, barbels and other cyprinids 616 828 574 405 569 934 616 985 624 333 594 392 648 160
freshwater fish Tilapias and other cichlids 636 758 680 004 678 157 662 276 689 661 754 395 753 372
freshwater fish Miscellaneous freshwater fishes 5 592 329 5 634 005 5 733 341 5 400 530 6 234 448 6 277 565 6 797 864
finfish Sturgeons, paddlefishes 2 851 2 603 2 313 1 908 1 628 1 450 1 333
freshwater fish River eels 11 939 16 138 12 374 11 444 10 516 10 746 10 463
finfish Salmons, trouts, smelts 913 327 805 154 891 042 809 873 966 097 880 261 1 031 141
migratory fish Shads 788 770 860 346 665 284 589 692 524 800 569 160 605 548
finfish Miscellaneous migratory fishes 75 921 83 328 75 650 79 538 79 465 68 077 65 817
demersal fish Flounders, halibuts, soles 956 926 1 009 253 948 427 915 177 917 326 862 162 900 012
finfish Cods, hakes, haddocks 9 431 141 8 695 910 9 304 922 8 474 044 9 385 328 9 398 780 8 964 873
finfish Miscellaneous coastal fishes 6 119 412 6 112 189 6 310 904 6 315 752 6 789 732 7 002 006 6 640 784
demersal fish Miscellaneous demersal fishes 2 955 849 3 033 384 3 008 283 3 062 222 3 059 707 3 163 050 2 986 081
pelagic fish Herrings, sardines, anchovies 22 671 427 24 919 239 20 640 734 22 289 332 18 840 389 23 047 541 22 404 769
pelagic fish Tunas, bonitos, billfishes 5 943 593 5 816 647 5 782 841 6 138 999 6 197 087 6 160 868 6 243 122
pelagic fish Miscellaneous pelagic fishes 10 712 994 10 654 041 12 332 170 11 772 320 11 525 390 11 181 871 11 179 641
sharks etc. Sharks, rays, chimaeras 858 007 870 455 845 854 845 820 880 785 819 012 771 105
other fish Marine fishes not identified 10 721 534 10 736 398 10 599 122 10 513 550 9 714 669 9 747 625 9 565 512
crustacean Freshwater crustaceans 494 111 563 641 626 407 816 405 366 117 353 446 391 526
crustacean Crabs, sea spiders 1 061 042 1 101 880 1 093 256 1 122 414 1 334 001 1 332 932 1 323 616
crustacean Lobsters, spiny rock lobsters 229 179 227 950 222 138 225 646 225 793 233 825 231 233
crustacean King crabs, squat lobsters 77 644 67 932 46 382 41 853 43 993 36 457 52 064
crustacean Shrimps, prawns 3 028 171 3 089 755 2 957 730 2 969 311 3 545 309 3 542 438 3 416 533
crustacean Krill, planktonic crustaceans 101 957 114 425 104 216 125 989 117 981 118 164 127 034
crustacean Miscellaneous marine crustaceans 1 293 164 1 372 858 1 427 312 1 359 158 449 711 486 249 470 568
mollusc Freshwater molluscs 552 452 595 286 628 205 631 444 435 668 427 843 415 105
mollusc Abalones, winkles, conchs 121 414 120 190 131 429 112 798 121 844 133 240 120 400
mollusc Oysters 158 196 249 675 198 132 185 122 196 424 150 088 166 145
mollusc Mussels 207 470 261 635 240 718 224 741 186 062 188 359 143 182
mollusc Scallops, pectens 609 418 665 569 702 382 750 445 804 349 790 887 711 342
mollusc Clams, cockles, ark shells 841 658 798 069 822 520 799 336 899 362 835 150 705 649
mollusc Squids, cuttlefishes, octopuses 3 602 711 3 679 332 3 348 493 3 261 615 3 612 308 3 807 189 3 892 145
mollusc Miscellaneous marine molluscs 1 562 141 1 509 752 1 505 608 1 486 114 936 169 988 220 1 049 731
other Frogs and other amphibians 1 807 2 328 2 486 2 463 2 917 2 836 2 845
other Turtles 1 243 1 010 818 1 444 1 498 408 422
other Sea squirts and other tunicates 3 905 3 858 2 427 2 320 2 951 2 496 2 735
other Horseshoe crabs and other arachnoids 2 397 1 696 1 299 1 387 1 190 519 732
echinoderm Sea urchins and other echinoderms 121 567 122 480 107 460 123 955 107 109 115 831 100 063
other Miscellaneous aquatic invertebrates 542 659 556 787 475 045 454 572 521 855 278 097 360 679
World total 93 623 912 95 609 607 93 045 815 93 197 994 90 353 972 94 363 635 93 253 346

Projected production

The following table shows the fish production in 2004 and projections for 2010 and later simulation target years.[5] All figures, other than percentages, are in million tonnes.

2000 2004 2010 2015 2020 2020 2030
Information source FAO statistics[6] FAO statistics[7] SOFIA 2002[8] FAO study[9] SOFIA 2002[10] IFPRI study[11] SOFIA 2002[12]
Marine capture 86.8 85.8 86 86 87
Inland capture 8.8 9.2 6 6 6
Total capture 95.6 95.0 93 105 93 116 93
Aquaculture 35.5 45.5 53 74 70 54 83
Total production 131.1 140.5 146 179 163 170 176
Food fish production 96.9 105.6 120 138 130 150
Percentage used for food fish 74% 75% 82% 85% 77% 85%
Non-food use 34.2 34.8 26 26 40 26

See also


wild
 marine 
pelagic
 predator 







forage



sardine



anchovy



menhaden




 demersal 







freshwater



 farmed 





tilapia




Commercially important finfish fisheries

Notes

References


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