Uruguay national football team

Uruguay
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Los Charrúas
La Celeste
(The Sky Blue One)

La Garra Charrúa
Association Asociación Uruguaya de Fútbol (AUF)
Confederation CONMEBOL (South America)
Head coach Óscar Tabárez
Captain Diego Godín
Most caps Diego Forlán (112)
Top scorer Luis Suárez (44)
Home stadium Estadio Centenario, Montevideo
FIFA code URU
FIFA ranking
Current 20 2 (1 October 2015)
Highest 1 (June 1930)
Lowest 76 (December 1998)
Elo ranking
Current 12 (June 2015)
Highest 1 (Various dates 1920–31)
Lowest 46 (March 1980)
First international
 Uruguay 2–3 Argentina 
(Montevideo, Uruguay; 16 May 1901)[1]
Biggest win
 Uruguay 9–0 Bolivia 
(Lima, Peru; 9 November 1927)
Biggest defeat
 Uruguay 0–6 Argentina 
(Montevideo, Uruguay; 20 July 1902)
World Cup
Appearances 12 (First in 1930)
Best result Champions, 1930 and 1950
Copa America
Appearances 42 (First in 1916)
Best result Champions, 1916, 1917, 1920, 1923, 1924, 1926, 1935, 1942, 1956, 1959, 1967, 1983, 1987, 1995 and 2011
Confederations Cup
Appearances 2 (First in 1997)
Best result Fourth Place, 1997 and 2013

The Uruguayan national football team represents Uruguay in international association football and is controlled by the Uruguayan Football Association, the governing body for football in Uruguay. The current head coach is Óscar Tabárez. The Uruguayan side is commonly referred to as La Celeste (The Sky Blue One) or Charrúas.

Uruguay are frequently South American champions, most recently having won the 2011 Copa América. Uruguay have won the Copa América a record 15 times. The team has twice won the FIFA World Cup, including the first World Cup in 1930 as hosts, defeating Argentina 4–2 in the final. They won their second title in 1950, upsetting hosts Brazil 2–1 in the final match, which received an attendance higher than any football match ever.

They have won the Gold Medals in football at the Summer Olympics twice, in 1924 and 1928, before the creation of the World Cup. Uruguay also won the 1980 Mundialito, a tournament among former World Cup champions. In total, Uruguay have won 20 official titles, a world record for the most international titles held by any country.

Their success is amplified by the fact that the nation has a very small population of around 3.25 million inhabitants (2011 est.). Uruguay is by far the smallest country in the world to have won a World Cup in terms of population, 1.75 million inhabitants in 1930. The second-smallest country, by population, to have won the World Cup is Argentina with a population of nearly 28 million people in 1978. Uruguay is also the smallest country ever to win any World Cup medals; only five nations with a currently smaller population than Uruguay's have ever participated in any World Cup: Northern Ireland (three times), Slovenia (twice), Wales, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago. Uruguay is also the smallest nation to win Olympic gold medals in any team sport.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Stadium 2
  • Kits 3
  • Current team status 4
    • Group Stage 4.1
    • Knockout Stage 4.2
      • Quarterfinals 4.2.1
  • Players 5
    • Current squad 5.1
    • Recent call-ups 5.2
  • Competitive record 6
    • FIFA World Cup 6.1
    • FIFA World Cup Interconfederations Qualification Games 6.2
    • FIFA Confederations Cup 6.3
    • South American Championship 6.4
    • Copa América 6.5
    • Olympics record 6.6
    • Pan American Games 6.7
  • Honours 7
    • Minor tournaments 7.1
    • FIFA World Cup matches 7.2
    • Official matches 7.3
    • Records 7.4
    • World Cup winning captains 7.5
    • Most participations in the World Cups 7.6
    • Most Goals Scored in the World Cups 7.7
    • Most Games Played in the World Cups 7.8
    • Previous squads 7.9
  • Coaches 8
  • Emblem 9
  • Rivalries 10
    • Argentina 10.1
    • Brazil 10.2
  • Notes 11
  • References 12
  • External links 13

History

Uruguay before its second official match (vs. Argentina), in July 1902
The team that won its second Gold Medal at the 1928 Summer Olympics.

In 1901, Uruguay played against Argentina in their first ever match, a close contest won by Argentina 3–2. Prior to 1916, Uruguay played more than 30 matches, of which all but one were against Argentina. The inaugural Copa America provided Uruguay with more varied opposition. Victories over Chile and Brazil, along with a tie against Argentina, enabled Uruguay to win the tournament. The following year Uruguay hosted the competition, and retained the title by winning every game. The 1919 Copa América saw Uruguay's first defeat in the tournament, a 1–0 defeat in a playoff with Brazil which went to two periods of extra time, the longest Copa América match in history.

In 1924, the Uruguay team traveled to FIFA World Cup, in 1930.[4]

The team that beat Brazil in the decisive match of the 1950 FIFA World Cup to win Uruguay's second FIFA World Cup.

Following the double Olympic triumph, Uruguay was chosen as the host nation for the first World Cup, held in 1930, the centenary of Uruguay's first constitution. During the World Cup, Uruguay won all its matches, and converted a 1–2 half-time deficit to a 4–2 victory against Argentina at the Estadio Centenario. Due to the refusal of some European teams to participate in the first World Cup, the Uruguayan Football Association urged other countries to reciprocate by boycotting the 1934 World Cup played in Italy. For the 1938 World Cup, France was chosen as host, contrary to a previous agreement to alternate the championships between South America and Europe, so Uruguay again refused to participate.

Uruguay again won the World Cup in 1950, beating hosts Brazil in one of the biggest upsets in World Cup history. The final was at the Maracanã Stadium in Brazil. Uruguay came from behind to beat the host nation in a match which would become known as the Maracanazo. Many Brazilians had to be treated for shock after the event, such was the surprise of Uruguay's victory.[5]

After their fourth-place finish in the 1954 World Cup, the team had mixed performances and after the fourth-place finish in 1970, their dominance, quality and performance dropped. They were no longer a world football power and failed to qualify for the World Cup on five occasions in the last nine competitions. They reached an all-time low and at one time ranked 76th in the FIFA World Rankings.

In 2010, however, a new generation of footballers, led by Luis Suárez, Diego Forlán and Edison Cavani, formed a team considered to be Uruguay's best in the last four decades, catching international attention after finishing fourth in the 2010 World Cup. Uruguay opened the tournament with a goalless draw against France, followed by defeats of South Africa (3–0) in and Mexico (1–0) respectively, finishing at the top of their group with seven points. In the second round, they played South Korea, defeating them 2–1 with striker Luis Suárez scoring a brace and earning Uruguay a spot in the quarter-finals for the first time since 1970. Against Ghana, the match finished 1–1, forcing the game into extra-time. Ghana nearly scored a winning goal but, to the outrage of the Ghanaians, Suárez purposely blocked the ball with his hand in the penalty area, earning him a red card. Ghana striker Asamoah Gyan missed the subsequent penalty, forcing the game to go into penalties where Uruguay would win 4–2, sending them into the last four. They played the Netherlands in the semifinals but were beaten 3–2. For the third-place match, they played Germany, again losing 3–2. This placed Uruguay in fourth place for the tournament, their best result in 40 years.

A year later, they won the Copa America for the first time in 16 years and broke the record for the most successful team in South America.

In the FIFA Disciplinary Committee banned Suárez for nine international matches, the longest such ban in World Cup history, exceeding the eight-match ban handed to Italy's Mauro Tassotti for breaking the nose of Spain's Luis Enrique in 1994.[6][7][8] Suárez was also banned from taking part in any football-related activity (including entering any stadium) for four months and fined CHF100,000 (approx. £65,700/82,000/US$119,000).[6][7][9] In the round of 16, Uruguay played Colombia but were beaten 2–0, eliminating them from the tournament.

Stadium

Since 1930, Uruguay have played their home games at the Estadio Centenario in the Uruguayan capital Montevideo. The stadium was built as a celebration of the centenary of Uruguay's first constitution, and had a capacity of 90,000 when first fully opened.[10] The stadium hosted several matches in the 1930 World Cup, including the final, which was watched by a crowd of 93,000.[11] Crowds for Uruguay's home matches vary greatly depending on the importance of the match and the quality of the opposition. World Cup qualifying matches often attract crowds of between 50,000 and 73,000.

Uruguay's stadium Estadio Centenario is one of the biggest stadiums in the world over 100m wide and 100m long.

Kits

Uruguay at the 2014 FIFA World Cup, wearing the light blue shirt they have worn since 1910.

Between 1901 and 1910, Uruguay wore a variety of different shirts during matches, including solid green and white tops, and even a shirt modeled from the Flag of Artigas. On April 10, 1910, now-defunct River Plate F.C. defeated Argentine team Alumni by 2-1, being the first time an Uruguayan team beat legendary Alumni. That day River Plate wore its alternate jersey, a light blue one due to the home jersey was similar to Alumni's. Ricardo LeBas proposed Uruguay to wear a light blue jersey as a tribute to the victory of River Plate over Alumni. This was approved by president of the Uruguayan Association, Héctor Gómez.[12]

The red jersey that is used in today's away strip was first used at the 1935 Copa América, held in Santa Beatriz in Peru, which Uruguay won. It was not worn again (except for a 1962 FIFA World Cup match, against Colombia[13]) until 1991, when it was officially adopted as the away jersey.

Four stars appear above the team logo on the jersey. Two represent Uruguay's 1930 and 1950 World Cup victories, and the other two represent the gold medals received at the 1924 and 1928 Summer Olympics and recognised by FIFA as World Championships.[4]

1901 (a)
1901–1910 (b)
1901–10 (b)
1901–10 (b)
1901–10 (b)(c)
1901–10 (b)
1910–present [12]
1935-2010 (away) (d)

Current team status

2018 FIFA World Cup Qualification Standings
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Uruguay 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5 6 Qualification to 2018 FIFA World Cup MD11 MD4 MD8 MD13 3–0 MD15 MD6 MD9 MD18
2  Ecuador 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 6 MD3 MD9 MD5 MD7 MD14 MD18 MD16 MD12 2–0
3  Chile 2 2 0 0 6 3 +3 6 MD12 MD17 MD15 2–0 MD3 MD5 MD10 MD14 MD8
4  Paraguay 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 4 MD16 MD13 MD7 MD6 MD9 0–0 MD11 MD18 MD4
5  Brazil 2 1 0 1 3 3 0 3 Advance to inter-confederation play-offs MD5 MD15 MD18 MD14 MD8 MD11 MD4 3–1 MD9
6  Colombia 2 1 0 1 2 3 −1 3 MD10 MD6 MD11 MD17 MD16 MD4 2–0 MD7 MD13
7  Argentina 2 0 1 1 0 2 −2 1 MD7 0–2 MD13 MD10 MD3 MD12 MD17 MD16 MD6
8  Peru 2 0 0 2 3 6 −3 0 MD14 MD8 3–4 MD3 MD12 MD18 MD9 MD5 MD15
9  Venezuela 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3 0 MD17 MD4 MD6 0–1 MD10 MD15 MD8 MD13 MD11
10  Bolivia 2 0 0 2 0 4 −4 0 0–2 MD10 MD16 MD12 MD17 MD5 MD14 MD7 MD3
Updated to match(es) played on 13 October 2015. Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers
2015 Copa América

Group Stage

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
 Argentina 3 2 1 0 4 2 +2 7
 Paraguay 3 1 2 0 4 3 +1 5
 Uruguay 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 4
 Jamaica 3 0 0 3 0 3 −3 0
13 June 2015
16:00 (UTC−3)
Uruguay  1–0  Jamaica
C. Rodríguez  51' Report

16 June 2015
20:30 (UTC−3)
Argentina  1–0  Uruguay
Agüero  55' Report
Estadio La Portada, La Serena
Attendance: 17,014
Referee: Sandro Ricci (Brazil)

20 June 2015
16:00 (UTC−3)
Uruguay  1–1  Paraguay
Giménez  28' Report Barrios  44'
Estadio La Portada, La Serena
Attendance: 16,021
Referee: Roberto García (Mexico)

Knockout Stage

Quarterfinals

24 June 2015
20:30 (UTC−3)
Chile  1–0  Uruguay
Isla  81' Report


Recent games

Players

Current squad

The following 24 players were called for the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification (CONMEBOL) against Ecuador on November 12 and Chile on November 17, 2015.

Caps and goals, correct on October 13, 2015 subsequent to the match against Colombia.
0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Fernando Muslera (1986-06-16) June 16, 1986 75 0 Galatasaray
1GK Martín Silva (1983-03-25) March 25, 1983 7 0 Vasco da Gama
1GK Rodrigo Muñoz (1982-01-22) January 22, 1982 0 0 Libertad
2DF Maxi Pereira (1984-06-08) June 8, 1984 107 3 Porto
2DF Diego Godín (Captain) (1986-02-16) February 16, 1986 95 6 Atlético Madrid
2DF Álvaro Pereira (1985-11-28) November 28, 1985 74 6 Estudiantes
2DF Martín Cáceres (1987-04-07) April 7, 1987 67 2 Juventus
2DF José Giménez (1995-01-20) January 20, 1995 25 3 Atlético Madrid
2DF Sebastián Coates (1990-10-07) October 7, 1990 18 1 Sunderland
2DF Emiliano Velázquez (1994-04-30) April 30, 1994 1 0 Getafe
2DF Gastón Silva (1994-03-05) March 5, 1994 1 0 Torino
3MF Cristian Rodríguez (1985-09-30) September 30, 1985 89 9 Independiente
3MF Egidio Arévalo Ríos (1982-01-01) January 1, 1982 73 0 UANL
3MF Álvaro González (1984-10-29) October 29, 1984 59 3 Atlas
3MF Nicolás Lodeiro (1989-03-21) March 21, 1989 42 3 Boca Juniors
3MF Carlos Sánchez (1984-12-02) December 2, 1984 12 0 River Plate
3MF Mathías Corujo (1986-05-08) May 8, 1986 11 0 Universidad de Chile
3MF Giorgian De Arrascaeta (1994-05-01) May 1, 1994 7 1 Cruzeiro
3MF Camilo Mayada (1991-01-08) January 8, 1991 7 0 River Plate
4FW Edinson Cavani (1987-02-14) February 14, 1987 76 27 Paris Saint-Germain
4FW Christian Stuani (1986-10-12) October 12, 1986 26 5 Middlesbrough
4FW Abel Hernández (1990-08-08) August 8, 1990 24 10 Hull City
4FW Diego Rolán (1993-03-24) March 24, 1993 15 3 Bordeaux
4FW Jonathan Rodríguez (1993-07-06) July 6, 1993 9 1 Deportivo La Coruña

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the Uruguay squad in the past 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Martín Campaña (1989-05-29) May 29, 1989 0 0 Defensor Sporting v.  Colombia, October 13, 2015
DF Jorge Fucile (1984-11-19) November 19, 1984 44 0 Nacional 2015 Copa América
DF Matías Aguirregaray (1989-04-01) April 1, 1989 6 0 Peñarol 2015 Copa América PRE
MF Brian Lozano (1994-02-23) February 23, 1994 2 0 Defensor Sporting v.  Colombia, October 13, 2015
MF Nahitan Nández (1995-12-28) December 28, 1995 2 0 Peñarol v.  Colombia, October 13, 2015
MF Guzmán Pereira (1991-05-16) May 16, 1991 3 0 Universidad de Chile 2015 Copa América INJ
MF Walter Gargano (1984-07-23) July 23, 1984 64 1 Monterrey 2015 Copa América PRE
MF Gastón Ramírez (1990-12-02) December 2, 1990 34 0 Southampton v.  Morocco, March 28, 2015
FW Michael Santos (1993-03-13) March 13, 1993 1 0 River Plate Montevideo v.  Colombia, October 13, 2015
FW Luis Suárez (1987-01-24) January 24, 1987 82 43 Barcelona v.  Chile, November 18, 2014 SUS

INJ Withdrew due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
RET Retired from international football.
SUS Suspended in official matches.

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld Won Drawn* Lost GF GA Pld Won Drawn Lost GF GA Pos
1930 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 15 3 Qualified as Hosts
1934 Refuse to participate Qualified as defending champions
1938
1950 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 15 5 Qualified automatically***
1954 Fourth Place 4th 5 3 0 2 16 9 Qualified as defending champions
1958 Did Not Qualify 4 2 1 1 4 6 2/3
1962 Group Stage 13th 3 1 0 2 4 6 2 1 1 0 3 2 1/2
1966 Quarter-Finals 7th 4 1 2 1 2 5 4 4 0 0 11 2 1/2
1970 Fourth Place 4th 6 2 1 3 4 5 4 3 1 0 5 0 1/3
1974 Group Stage 13th 3 0 1 2 1 6 4 2 1 1 6 2 1/3
1978 Did Not Qualify 4 1 2 1 5 4 2/3
1982 Did Not Qualify 4 1 2 1 5 5 2/3
1986 Round of 16 16th 4 0 2 2 2 8 4 3 0 1 6 4 1/3
1990 Round of 16 16th 4 1 1 2 2 5 4 3 0 1 7 2 1/3
1994 Did Not Qualify 8 4 2 2 10 7 3/5
1998 Did Not Qualify 16 6 3 7 18 21 7/9
2002 Group Stage 26th 3 0 2 1 4 5 18 7 6 5 19 13 5/10
2006 Did Not Qualify 18 6 7 5 23 28 5/10
2010 Fourth Place 4th 7 3 2(1*) 2 11 8 18 6 6 6 28 20 5/10
2014 Round of 16 12th 4 2 0 2 4 6 16 7 4 5 25 25 5/9
2018 To be determined
2022
Total 2 titles 12/20 51 20 12 19 80 71 128 56 36 36 175 141 5/10

FIFA World Cup Interconfederations Qualification Games

FIFA World Cup Interconfederations Qualification Games Record
Year Against Pld Won Drawn* Lost GF GA Dif Result
2002  Australia 2 1 0 1 3 1 2 Q
2006  Australia 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 NQ
2010  Costa Rica 2 1 1 0 2 1 1 Q
2014  Jordan 2 1 1 0 5 0 5 Q
Total Various 8 4 2 2 11 3 8 3/4
All Time Totals Various 136 60 38 38 186 144 42 9/15
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks. Darker color indicates win, normal color indicates lost.
**Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.
***Uruguay, Chile, Bolivia and Paraguay qualified automatically after the withdrawal of Argentina, Ecuador and Peru by default.

FIFA Confederations Cup

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld Won Drawn * Lost GF GA Squad
1992 Did Not Qualify
1995
1997 Fourth Place 4th 5 3 0 2 8 6 Squad
1999 Did Not Qualify
2001
2003
2005
2009
2013 Fourth Place 4th 5 2 1 2 14 7 Squad
2017 Did Not Qualify
2021 To Be Determined
Total Fourth Place 2/11 10 5 1 4 22 13 -

South American Championship

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

South American Championship
Year Round Position GP Won Drawn* Lost GS GA
1916 Champions 1st 3 2 1 0 06 01
1917 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 09 00
1919 Runners-up 2nd 3 2 1 0 07 04
1920 Champions 1st 3 2 1 0 09 02
1921 Third Place 3rd 3 1 0 2 03 04
1922 Third Place 3rd 4 2 1 1 03 01
1923 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 06 01
1924 Champions 1st 3 2 1 0 08 01
1925 Withdrew
1926 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 17 02
1927 Runners-up 2nd 3 2 0 1 15 03
1929 Third Place 3rd 3 1 0 2 04 06
1935 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 06 01
1937 Third Place 3rd 5 2 0 3 11 14
1939 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 13 05
1941 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 10 01
1942 Champions 1st 6 6 0 0 21 02
1945 Fourth Place 4th 6 3 0 3 14 06
1946 Fourth Place 4th 5 2 0 3 11 09
1947 Third Place 3rd 7 5 0 2 21 08
1949 Sixth Place 6th 7 2 1 4 14 20
1953 Third Place 3rd 6 3 1 2 15 06
1955 Fourth Place 4th 5 2 1 2 12 12
1956 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 09 03
1957 Third Place 3rd 6 4 0 2 15 12
1959 Sixth Place 6th 6 2 0 4 15 14
1959 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 13 01
1963 Withdrew
1967 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 13 02
Total 11 Titles 27/29 119 75 11 33 300 141

Copa América

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

Copa América
Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1975 Fourth Place 4th 2 1 0 1 1 3
1979 Group Stage 6th 4 1 2 1 5 5
1983 Champions 1st 8 5 2 1 12 6
1987 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 2 0
1989 Runners-up 2nd 7 4 0 3 11 3
1991 Group Stage 5th 4 1 3 0 4 3
1993 Quarter-Finals 6th 4 1 2 1 5 5
1995 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 11 4
1997 Group Stage 9th 3 1 0 2 2 2
1999 Runners-up 2nd 6 1 2 3 4 9
2001 Fourth Place 4th 6 2 2 2 7 7
2004 Third Place 3rd 6 3 2 1 12 10
2007 Fourth Place 4th 6 2 2 2 8 9
2011 Champions 1st 6 3 3 0 9 3
2015 Quarter-Finals 7th 4 1 1 2 2 3
2016 Qualified
2019
2023
Total 4 Titles 15/15 74 32 23 19 95 72

Olympics record

     Gold       Silver       Bronze  

Olympics record
Year Round Position GP Won Drawn* Lost GS GA
1908 Did not participate
1912
1920
1924 Gold medal 1st 5 5 0 0 20 2
1928 Gold medal 1st 5 4 1 0 12 5
1936 Withdrew[15]
1948 to 1972 Did not Qualify
1976 Withdrew[16]
1980 to 2008 Did not Qualify
2012 Group Stage 9th 3 1 0 2 2 4
2016 To be determined
2020
Total 2 Gold Medal 3/25 13 10 1 2 34 11

Pan American Games

Pan American Games record
Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1951 to 1959 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1963 Fourth Place 4th 4 1 0 3 4 6
1967 to 1971 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1975 Preliminary Round 11th 2 0 1 1 1 2
1979 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1983 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 5 1
1987 to 1995 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1999 Preliminary Round 9th 4 0 1 3 2 9
2003 to 2007 Did not enter - - - - - - -
2011 Third Place 3rd 5 2 1 2 6 8
2015 Champions 1st 5 4 0 1 8 2
Total 2 Titles 6/16 24 11 3 10 26 28

Honours

Note: The list above is for Senior and Olympic teams.

Minor tournaments