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Truism

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Title: Truism  
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Truism

A truism is a claim that is so obvious or self-evident as to be hardly worth mentioning, except as a reminder or as a rhetorical or literary device, and is the opposite of falsism.[1]

In philosophy, a sentence which asserts incomplete truth conditions for a proposition may be regarded as a truism. An example of such a sentence would be "Under appropriate conditions, the sun rises." Without contextual support – a statement of what those appropriate conditions are – the sentence is true but incontestable. A statement which is true by definition (for example, the Lapalissade "If he were not dead, he would still be alive") would also be considered a truism. This is quite similar to a tautology in which the conclusion of a statement is essentially equivalent to its premise, a statement that is "true by virtue of its logical form alone".[2]

The word may also be used with a different sense in rhetoric, to disguise the fact that a proposition is really just an opinion. Similarly, stating an accepted truth about life in general can also be called a truism.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Definition: truism". http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/: Webster's Online Dictionary. Retrieved 2010-03-10. Noun Base (truism)
  2. An obvious truth. Wordnet.
  3. An undoubted or self-evident truth; a statement which is pliantly true; a proposition needing no proof or argument; -- opposed to falsism. Websters.
  4.  
  5. ^ http://cougar.eb.com/dictionary/tautologous
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