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Trophée des Champions

 

Trophée des Champions

Trophée des Champions
Founded 1995
Region  France
Number of teams 2
Current champions Paris Saint-Germain (5th title)
Most successful club(s) Lyon (8 titles)
Television broadcasters beIN Sport
2015 Trophée des Champions

The Trophée des Champions (French pronunciation: ​, Champions' Trophy), is a French Ligue de Football Professionnel (LFP) and the Union Syndicale des Journalistes Sportifs de France (UJSF).

From 1955–1973, the French Football Federation (FFF) hosted a similar match known as the Challenge des champions. The match returned in 1985–86, but was immediately eliminated due to its unpopularity. In 1995, the FFF officially re-instated the competition under its current name and the inaugural match was contested between Paris Saint-Germain and Nantes in January 1996 at the Stade Francis-Le Blé in Brest. The following season, the match was not played due to Auxerre winning the double. A similar situation occurred in 2008 when Lyon won the double. The match was initially on the brink of cancellation, however, the LFP decided to allow the league runner-up, Bordeaux, to be Lyon's opponents. Bordeaux won the match 5–4 on penalties.

The Trophée des champions match is contested at the beginning of the following season and has been played at a variety of venues. During the Challenge des champions era, the match was in such cities as Marseille, Montpellier, Paris, Toulouse, and Saint-Étienne. From 1995–2008, the match was hosted three times at the Stade Gerland in Lyon. Other venues include the Stade Pierre de Coubertin twice in Cannes, the Stade de la Meinau in Strasbourg, and the Stade de l'Abbé Deschamps in Auxerre. On 12 May 2009, the French Football Federation announced that the 2009 Trophée des Champions would be played, for the first time, on international soil at Olympic Stadium in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.[1] It has since been held in Tunisia, Morocco, the United States, Gabon and China.

Contents

  • Matches 1
  • Results by clubs 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Matches

Season[2] Winners Score Runners-up Venue Attendance Notes
Champions of France vs. Coupe de France winners (1949)
1949 Stade Reims 4–3 Racing Paris Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir, Colombes
Challenge des champions (1955–73, 1985–86)
1955 Stade Reims 7–1 Lille Stade Vélodrome, Marseille
1956 Sedan 1–0 Nice Parc des Princes, Paris
1957 Saint-Étienne 2–1 Toulouse Stadium Municipal, Toulouse
1958 Stade Reims 2–1 Nîmes Stade Vélodrome, Marseille
1959 Le Havre 2–0 Nice Parc des Princes, Paris
1960 Stade Reims 6–2 AS Monaco Stade Marcel Saupin, Nantes
1961 AS Monaco 1–1[nb 1] Sedan Stade Vélodrome, Marseille
1962 Saint-Étienne 4–2 Stade Reims Stade Municipal de Beaublanc, Limoges
1965 Nantes 3–2 Rennes Stade du Moustoir, Lorient
1966 Stade Reims 2–0 Nantes Stade Marcel Saupin, Nantes
1967 Saint-Étienne 3–0 Lyon Stade Geoffroy-Guichard, Saint-Étienne
1968 Saint-Étienne 5–3 Bordeaux Stade Richter, Montpellier
1969 Saint-Étienne 3–2 Marseille Parc des Princes, Paris
1970 Nice 2–0 Saint-Étienne Stade du Ray, Nice
1971 Rennes 2–2[nb 2] Marseille Stade de l'Armoricaine, Brest
1972 Bastia 5–2 Marseille Stade de Bon Rencontre, Toulon
1973 Lyon 2–0 Nantes Stade de l'Armoricaine, Brest
1985 AS Monaco 1–1 (5–4 pen.) Bordeaux Parc Lescure, Bordeaux
1986 Bordeaux 1–0 Paris Saint-Germain Stade Guadeloupe, Les Abymes, Guadeloupe
Trophée des champions (1995–present)
1995[nb 3] Paris Saint-Germain 2–2 (6–5 pen.) Nantes Stade Francis-Le Blé, Brest 12,000
1996 Match was not played due to Auxerre winning the double.
1997 AS Monaco 5–2 Nice Stade de la Méditerranée, Béziers 4,000
1998 Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 Lens Stade de la Vallée du Cher, Tours 12,766
1999 Nantes 1–0 Bordeaux Stade de la Licorne, Amiens 11,858
2000 AS Monaco 0–0 (6–5 pen.) Nantes Stade Bonal, Montbéliard 9,918
2001 Nantes 4–1 Strasbourg Stade de la Meinau, Strasbourg 7,227
2002 Lyon 5–1 Lorient Stade Pierre-de-Coubertin, Cannes 5,041
2003 Lyon 2–1 Auxerre Stade Gerland, Lyon 18,254
2004 Lyon 1–1 (7–6 pen.) Paris Saint-Germain Stade Pierre-de-Coubertin, Cannes 9,429
2005 Lyon 4–1 Auxerre Stade de l'Abbé-Deschamps, Auxerre 10,967
2006 Lyon 1–1 (5–4 pen.) Paris Saint-Germain Stade Gerland, Lyon 30,529
2007 Lyon 2–1 Sochaux Stade Gerland, Lyon 30,413
2008 Bordeaux 0–0 (5–4 pen.) Lyon Stade Chaban-Delmas, Bordeaux 27,167
2009 Bordeaux 2–0 Guingamp Stade Olympique, Montreal, Canada 34,068
2010 Marseille 0–0 (5–4 pen.) Paris Saint-Germain Stade Olympique de Radès, Tunis, Tunisia 57,000
2011 Marseille 5–4 Lille Stade de Tanger, Tanger, Morocco 33,900
2012 Lyon 2–2 (4–2 pen.) Montpellier Red Bull Arena, Harrison, United States 15,166
2013 Paris Saint-Germain 2–1 Bordeaux Stade d'Angondjé, Libreville, Gabon 34,658
2014 Paris Saint-Germain 2–0 Guingamp Workers Stadium, Beijing, China 39,752
2015 Paris Saint-Germain 2–0 Lyon Stade Saputo, Montreal, Canada 20,057

Results by clubs

Club Won Runner-up Years won Years runner-up
Lyon 8 3 1973, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2012 1967, 2008, 2015
Paris Saint-Germain 5 4 1995, 1998, 2013, 2014, 2015 1986, 2004, 2006, 2010
Stade Reims 5 1 1949, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1966 1962
Saint-Étienne 5 1 1957, 1962, 1967, 1968, 1969 1970
AS Monaco 4 1 1961, 1985, 1997, 2000 1960
Nantes 3 4 1965, 1999, 2001 1966, 1973, 1995, 2000
Bordeaux 3 4 1986, 2008, 2009 1968, 1986, 1999, 2013
Marseille 3 2 1971, 2010, 2011 1969, 1972
Nice 1 3 1970 1956, 1959, 1997
Sedan 1 1 1956 1961
Rennes 1 1 1971 1965
Le Havre 1 0 1959
Bastia 1 0 1972
Lille 0 2 1955, 2011
Auxerre 0 2 2003, 2005
Guingamp 0 2 2009, 2014
Racing Paris 0 1 1949
Toulouse 0 1 1957
Nîmes 0 1 1958
Lens 0 1 1998
Strasbourg 0 1 2001
Lorient 0 1 2002
Sochaux 0 1 2007
Montpellier 0 1 2012

Notes

  1. ^ No penalties were constituted. AS Monaco won the match via lottery.
  2. ^ No winner was declared. Title was shared between the two clubs.
  3. ^ Match was played in January 1996.

References

  1. ^ "Le Trophée des champions à Montréal". L'Equipe. 12 May 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  2. ^ "Palmares". Ligue de Football Professionnel. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 

External links

  • Official site (French)
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