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Temeşvar Eyalet

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Temeşvar Eyalet

Eyalet of Temeşvar
Eyâlet-i Temeşvar
Eialetul Timişoarei
Temišvarski ejalet
Temesvári vilajet
Eyālet-i Temešvār
Eyalet of the Ottoman Empire

1552–1716
Location of Temeşvar Eyalet
Temeşvar Eyalet in 1683
Capital Temeşvar[1] (Romanian: Timişoara) and Yanova[2] (Romanian: Ineu)
History
 -  Established 1552
 -  Austro-Turkish War of 1716–1718 1716
Today part of  Romania
 Serbia
 Hungary
Ottoman Temeşvar (Timişoara) in 1650
Ottoman Beçkerek (Bečkerek) in 1697/98

The Eyalet of Temeşvar (Ottoman Turkish: ایالت تمشوار; Eyālet-i Temešvār),[3] known as Eyalet of Yanova after 1658,[4] was a first-level administrative unit (eyalet) of the Ottoman Empire located in the Banat region of Central Europe.

Besides Banat, the province also included area north of the Mureş River, part of the Crişana region. Its territory is now divided between Hungary, Romania, and Serbia. Its capital was Temeşvar (Romanian: Timişoara).

Contents

  • Names 1
  • History 2
  • Administrative divisions 3
  • Beylerbeyleri (governors) 4
  • Maps 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • Further reading 8
  • External links 9

Names

The name of the province in Ottoman Turkish was Eyâlet-i Temeşvar or Eyâlet-i Tımışvar (in Modern Turkish: Temeşvar Eyaleti or Tamışvar Eyaleti), in Hungarian was Temesvári vilajet, in Romanian was Eialetul Timişoarei or Paşalâcul Timişoara, in Serbian was Темишварски ејалет or Temišvarski ejalet. The province was named after its administrative seat, Temeşvar. The Turkish name Temeşvar is given after the Hungarian one, Temesvár meaning "Castle on the Temes" (River).

History

Famous mosques in the city of Timișoara, Romania in the year 1656.

The Eyalet of Temeşvar was formed in 1552, when the Hungarian castle of Temesvár defended by the troop of István Losonczy was captured by the Ottoman troops led by Kara Ahmed Pasha in July 26, 1552[5] and existed until 1716, when it was conquered by the Habsburg Monarchy. The Eyalet was led by a vali (governor) or beylerbey (sometimes with position of pasha or vizir), whose residence was at the former Hunyadi Castle in Temeşvar. In 1718, the Habsburgs formed a new province in this region, named the Banat of Temeswar.

Administrative divisions

Before the Treaty of Karlowitz in 1699, the province was divided into following sanjaks:[6]
  1. Sanjak of Temeşvar (Timişoara)
  2. Sanjak of Çanad (Cenad)
  3. Sanjak of Lipva (Lipova)
  4. Sanjak of Yanova (Ineu)
  5. Sanjak of Küle (Gyula)
  6. Sanjak of Fenlak (Felnac)
  7. Sanjak of Beçkerek (Bečkerek)
  8. Sanjak of Çakova (Ciacova)
  9. Sanjak of Pançova (Pančevo)
  10. Sanjak of Modava (Moldova Nouă)
  11. Sanjak of Orşova (Orşova)

Sanjaks of Küle, Yanova, Fenlak and northern parts of the Çanad and Lipva sanjaks were transferred to Habsburg Monarchy after signing of the Treaty of Karlowitz.

The eyalet consisted of five sanjaks between 1700 and 1701:[7]
  1. Sanjak of Tımışvar (Paşa Sancaığı, Timişoara)
  2. Sanjak of Cenad or Çanad[5] (Cenad)
  3. Sanjak of Modava (Moldova Veche)
  4. Sanjak of Segedin (Szeged)
  5. Sanjak of Lipova (Lipova)

Note: Before the Treaty of Karlowitz, Sanjak of Segedin was part of the Egir Eyalet. Most of this sanjak (including its administrative center, Segedin) was transferred to the Habsburg Monarchy in 1699. Small eastern part of the sanjak on the left bank of the river Tisa remained within Ottoman Empire.

According to Sancak Tevcih Defteri, the eyalet consisted of six sanjaks between 1701 and 1702:[7][8]
  1. Sanjak of Tımışvar (Paşa Sancaığı, Timişoara)
  2. Sanjak of Cenad or Çanad[5] (Cenad)
  3. Sanjak of Şebeş Lagoş (Caransebeş-Lugoj)
  4. Sanjak of Modava (Moldova Veche)
  5. Sanjak of İrşora or Orşova[5] (Irişoara)
  6. Sanjak of Lipova (Lipova)
The eyalet consisted of three sanjaks between 1707 and 1713:[7]
  1. Sanjak of Tımışvar (Paşa Sancağı, Timişoara)
  2. Sanjak of Sirem (Syrmia)
  3. Sanjak of Semendire (Smederevo)

Beylerbeyleri (governors)

Maps

See also

References

  1. ^ Halil Inaldžik, Osmansko carstvo, Beograd, 2003, page 166.
  2. ^ Narrative of travels in Europe, Asia, and Africa in the ..., Volume 1, p. 92, at Google Books By Evliya Çelebi, Joseph von Hammer-Purgstall
  3. ^ "Some Provinces of the Ottoman Empire". Geonames.de. Retrieved 25 February 2013. 
  4. ^ Osman Okyar; Hali̇l İnalcık (1980). Türkiye'nin Sosyal Ve Ekonomik Tarihi, 1071-1920: Birinci Uluslararası Türkiye'nin Sosyal Ve Ekonomik Tarihi Kongresi Tebliğleri. Meteksan. p. 68. Retrieved 3 June 2013. eyalet d'Ineu (Yanova) —nom donné après 1658 à l'eyalet de Temesvar 
  5. ^ a b c d Sadık Müfit Bilge, "Macaristan'da Osmanlı Hakimiyetinin ve İdarî Teşkilatının Kuruluşu ve Gelişmesi", Ankara Üniversitesi Osmanlı Tarihi Araştırma ve Uygulama Merkezi Dergisi (OTAM), Sayı: 11 Sayfa: 033-081, 2000, p. 59. (Turkish)
  6. ^ Dr Dušan J. Popović, Srbi u Vojvodini, knjiga I, Novi Sad, 1990, page 201.
  7. ^ a b c Orhan Kılıç, XVII. Yüzyılın İlk Yarısında Osmanlı Devleti'nin Eyalet ve Sancak Teşkilatlanması, Osmanlı, Cilt 6: Teşkilât, Yeni Türkiye Yayınları, Ankara, 1999, ISBN 975-6782-09-9, p. 92. (Turkish)
  8. ^ Orhan Kılıç, XVII. Yüzyılın İlk Yarısında Osmanlı Devleti'nin Eyalet ve Sancak Teşkilatlanması, Osmanlı, Cilt 6: Teşkilât, Yeni Türkiye Yayınları, Ankara, 1999, ISBN 975-6782-09-9, p. 91. (Turkish)
  9. ^ Milan Tutorov, Banatska rapsodija, Novi Sad, 2001, page 151.
  10. ^ Milan Tutorov, Banatska rapsodija, Novi Sad, 2001, page 194.
  11. ^ Milan Tutorov, Banatska rapsodija, Novi Sad, 2001, page 195.
  12. ^ Milan Tutorov, Banatska rapsodija, Novi Sad, 2001, page 198.
  13. ^ Milan Tutorov, Banatska rapsodija, Novi Sad, 2001, page 232.
  14. ^ Milan Tutorov, Banatska rapsodija, Novi Sad, 2001, page 249.

Further reading

  • Dr. Dušan J. Popović, Srbi u Vojvodini, knjiga 1, Novi Sad, 1990.
  • Milan Tutorov, Banatska rapsodija, Novi Sad, 2001.

External links

  • Province of Temeşvar in 1600 - Map
  • Province of Temeşvar in 1700 - Map
  • Province of Temeşvar - Map
  • Province of Temeşvar - Map
  • Province of Temeşvar - Map
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