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Synthetism

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Title: Synthetism  
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Subject: Paul Gauguin, Roberto Melli, Scuola Romana, Art movement, Fauvism
Collection: Post-Impressionism, Symbolism (Arts)
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Synthetism

The Talisman, by Paul Sérusier, one of the principal works of the Synthetist school
Synthetism is a term used by post-Impressionist artists like Paul Gauguin, Émile Bernard and Louis Anquetin to distinguish their work from Impressionism. Earlier, Synthetism has been connected to the term Cloisonnism, and later to Symbolism.[1] The term is derived from the French verb synthétiser (to synthesize or to combine so as to form a new, complex product).

Paul Gauguin, Émile Bernard, Louis Anquetin, and others pioneered the style during the late 1880s and early 1890s.

Synthetist artists aimed to synthesize three features:

  • The outward appearance of natural forms.
  • The artist’s feelings about their subject.
  • The purity of the aesthetic considerations of line, colour and form.

In 1890, Maurice Denis summarized the goals for synthetism as,

It is well to remember that a picture before being a battle horse, a nude woman, or some anecdote, is essentially a flat surface covered with colours assembled in a certain order.

The term was first used in 1877 to distinguish between scientific and naturalistic Exposition de peintures du groupe impressioniste et synthétiste in the Café Volpini at the Exposition Universelle in Paris. The confusing title has been mistakenly associated with impressionism. Synthetism emphasized two-dimensional flat patterns, thus differing from impressionist art and theory.

Synthetist paintings

Poster of the 1889 Exhibition of Paintings by the Impressionist and Synthetist Group, at Café des Arts, known as the The Volpini Exhibition, 1889.

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Brettell, Richard R. (1999). Modern Art, 1851-1929: Capitalism and Representation. Oxford University Press.  
  2. ^ Charles Laval Retrieved April 6, 2011
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