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Slovakia national football team

Slovakia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Association Slovenský futbalový zväz (SFZ)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Ján Kozák
Captain Martin Škrtel
Most caps Miroslav Karhan (107)
Top scorer Róbert Vittek (23)
Home stadium Štadión pod Dubňom
FIFA code SVK
FIFA ranking
Current 18 3 (1 October 2015)
Highest 14 (August 2015)
Lowest 150 (December 1993)
Elo ranking
Current 28 (9 September 2015)
Highest 25 (June 2015)
Lowest 71 (October 2011)
First international
 Slovakia 2–0 Germany 
(Bratislava, Slovakia; 27 August 1939)
Second Slovak Republic:
 United Arab Emirates 0–1 Slovakia 
(Dubai, UAE; 2 February 1994)
Biggest win
 Slovakia 7–0 Liechtenstein 
(Bratislava, Slovakia; 8 September 2004)
 Slovakia 7–0 San Marino 
(Dubnica nad Váhom, Slovakia; 13 October 2007)
 Slovakia 7–0 San Marino 
(Bratislava, Slovakia; 6 June 2009)
Biggest defeat
 Argentina 6–0 Slovakia 
(Mendoza, Argentina; 22 June 1995)
World Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 2010)
Best result Round of 16, 2010
European Championship
Appearances 1 (First in 2016)
Best result TBD

The Slovakia national football team (Slovak: Slovenské národné futbalové mužstvo) represents Slovakia in association football and is controlled by the Slovak Football Association (SFZ), the governing body for football in Slovakia. Slovakia's home stadium is Štadión Pasienky and their head coach is Ján Kozák. Slovakia are one of the newest national football teams in the world, having split from the Czechoslovakia national football team after the dissolution of the unified state in 1993. Slovakia maintains its own national side that competes in all major professional tournaments.

Slovakia qualified for the FIFA World Cup in 2010 after winning their qualifying group despite two defeats against Slovenia, and progressed beyond the group stage after a 3–2 win against Italy, before bowing out of the tournament after a 2–1 defeat in the second round against eventual runners-up the Netherlands. It was the first time the team have ever played in a major football competition, after playing every FIFA World Cup qualifying campaign since 1998 and every UEFA European Football Championship qualifying campaign since 1996, after a 50-year absence from international football due to representing part of the Czechoslovakia team. They did come close to securing a berth at the 2006 finals in Germany, after finishing second in their group ahead of Russia and behind Portugal, before drawing Spain in their qualification play-off, in which the Slovaks lost by a wide margin on aggregate. The team have achieved some noteworthy results, however, such as the aforementioned win over the then title holders Italy at the 2010 FIFA World Cup and a 1–0 win against Russia in September 2010 which helped the team reach their best ever position of 16th in the FIFA World Rankings. Despite this success however, the team later dropped down the rankings and a considerable drop in form went with this, as the team failed to qualify for Euro 2012 finishing in their group in 4th place. They also only scored seven goals in the group, only more than minnows Andorra. Slovakia then failed to qualify to Brazil for 2014 FIFA World Cup, but secured a spot in France for UEFA Euro 2016 under Ján Kozák.

Slovakia's traditional rival is the Czech Republic which they played twice in the qualification for the 1998 FIFA World Cup in 1996 and 1997 winning 2–1 in Bratislava, before losing 3–0 in Prague with both teams already eliminated, before playing each other again in 2008 and 2009 in the qualifying round for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. In these two meetings the teams drew 2–2 in Bratislava with the Slovaks winning 2–1 in Prague. But before that, they also playing each other in UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying, and they lost 3–1 in Prague and 0–3 in Bratislava.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Stadium 2
  • Nickname 3
  • Kit 4
  • Tournament records 5
    • World Cup record 5.1
    • European Championship record 5.2
    • Olympic Games 5.3
  • Results and schedule 6
  • 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifying 7
  • 2016 UEFA Euro qualifying 8
  • All-time team record 9
  • Players 10
    • Current squad 10.1
    • Recent call-ups 10.2
  • Player statistics 11
    • Most capped players 11.1
    • Top goalscorers 11.2
  • Managers 12
    • 1939–1944 12.1
    • 1993–present 12.2
  • See also 13
  • References 14
  • External links 15

History

The first official match of the first Slovak Republic (1939–1945) was played in Bratislava against Germany on 27 August 1939, and ended in a 2–0 victory for Slovakia. After the Second World War, the national football team was subsumed into the team of Czechoslovakia, and for over fifty years Slovakia played no matches as an independent country. During this period they contributed several key players to the Czechoslovak team, including the majority of the team that won the 1976 European Championships (eight of the eleven players who defeated West Germany in the final were Slovak).

Former Slovakia national team before 1945

Slovakia's first official international after regaining independence was a 1–0 victory in Dubai over the United Arab Emirates on 2 February 1994. Their match back on Slovak soil was the 4–1 defeat against Croatia in Bratislava on 20 April 1994. Slovakia suffered their biggest defeat since independence (6–0) on 22 June 1995, in Mendoza, against Argentina. Their biggest wins (7–0) have come against Liechtenstein in 2004 and San Marino (twice) in 2007.

Slovakia played in a major championship as an independent team for the first time in Euro '96 qualifying, but finished in third place in their qualifying group, behind Romania and France, having recorded wins against Poland, Israel and Azerbaijan, twice. In the 1998 World Cup qualifiers, Slovakia finished fourth in their six-team group with five wins, one draw and four defeats. Their first four games in this were all wins, with one of these against their Czech neighbors, helping the team reach their highest FIFA World Ranking to date of No. 17.

Repre before match against Italy at 2010 FIFA World Cup

Slovakia participated in the FIFA World Cup for the first time in their history as an independent nation after finishing in first place in 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 3 ahead of Slovenia, Czech Republic, Northern Ireland, and Poland. On 14 October 2009, they clinched qualification with a 1–0 away win against Poland.[1] On 24 June 2010, Slovakia finished second in the group stage after defeating World Cup titleholders Italy in a game which ESPN called "epic". The game saw three goals being scored after the 80th minute, two by Italy and one by Slovakia, as well as, a disallowed goal by Italy flagged offside by "the tightest of decisions". The result led Slovakia to the knockout stage and eliminated Italy, which finished last in the group.[2] The result of this match meant that for the first time in World Cup history both finalists from the previous tournament have been eliminated from the first round, champion Italy and runner-up France.[3][4] From here the Slovaks played the Netherlands in the round of 16, Slovakia were complete underdogs going into the game, but for most of the match until conceding their first goal were creating chances. From here Slovakia lost belief they could go back into the match and then fell 2–0 behind only to score a late goal from the penalty spot which turned out to be the last kick of the game.[5] This returned Róbert Vittek to the top of the goalscoring charts joint top with David Villa until Villa himself scored against Portugal in a 1–0 win.

Captain of Slovakia national team Martin Škrtel

For UEFA Euro 2012 qualification, Slovakia was drawn against Russia, Ireland, Armenia, Macedonia and Andorra. The good campaign in South Africa boosted team performance ahead of the qualifiers, which started in September with two 1–0 wins against Macedonia in Stadion Pasienky and Russia away, this one in particular giving Slovakia the perfect start. However, October came and team form slipped steadily, as Repre was easily beaten in Armenia (3–1) and couldn't do better than a 1–1 home draw against Ireland. At that point, Russia topped the group charts with 9 points, with Slovakia, Armenia and Ireland all in 2-point-gap of the leaders.

However, 2011 got terribly worse. In February, the team was stunned in a 2–1 friendly defeat against Luxembourg, before needing to fight hard for two 1–0 wins against group minnows Andorra, who had conceded 11 goals in the previous four matches. Playing in Ireland in a six-point match, Slovakia got a goalless draw, despite having better chances, which kept both teams two points behind Russia, and leading Armenia by three. Four days later, even though, Slovakia had its most disastrous performance in years, as, after creating chances in a goalless first half, went on to concede four goals to an effective and brave Armenian team, what definitely ended team confidence in the tournament spot. In the final two matches, Slovakia was beaten at home by Russia, 1–0, despite playing much better than against Armenia, and drew in Macedonia 1–1, to a mediocre fourth place, and scoring only seven goals in the whole process. For the first time since UEFA Euro 1996, Slovakia finished a qualifying campaign with a negative goal difference. Vladimír Weiss left his job after four full years, being replaced by his assistants Michal Hipp and Stanislav Griga. Both were later replaced due to poor results. By late June, former Czechoslovakia national football team footballer Ján Kozák became the head coach. Matters did not improve with a dreadful 0–0 draw against UEFA newcomers (and its lowest ranked team) Gibraltar in November 2013.

For UEFA Euro 2016 qualification, Slovakia was drawn against Spain, Ukraine, Belarus, Macedonia and Luxembourg. Slovakia began the qualifying campaign with a 1–0 victory against Ukraine in Kiev. On 9 October 2014, Slovakia beat Spain 2–1 in a shock victory and claimed the first place. Slovakia's 3–1 victory over Belarus confirmed their status as group leaders. Later on, they won 2-0 against Macedonia in the Philip II Arena, Luxembourg with a score of 3-0 in Žilina, and Macedonia again with a score of 2-1 on June 14, 2015, also in Žilina. As of now, Slovakia is undefeated with 6 wins and remain as group leaders in Group C in this qualifying campaign.

Stadium

The Slovakia national football team is using three stadiums on the present: Štadión pod Dubňom in Žilina, Štadión Pasienky in Bratislava and Štadión Antona Malatinského in Trnava. The national team recently played, last in 2009, at the biggest Slovak stadium, Tehelné pole in Bratislava, but the stadium is currently undergoing major renovation. In the past, home games have occasionally been played at other venues as Všešportový areál and Lokomotíva Stadium in Košice, Štadión pod Zoborom in Nitra, Mestský štadión in Dubnica or Tatran Stadion in Prešov.

Stadiums which have hosted Slovakia international football matches:

Number of
matches
Stadium First international Last international
44 Tehelné pole, Bratislava 20 April 1994 14 November 2009
20 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina 30 April 2003 9 October 2015
10 Štadión Antona Malatinského, Trnava 24 April 1996 29 March 2011
9 Pasienky, Bratislava 18 August 1999 16 October 2012
4 Všešportový areál, Košice 8 March 1995 15 November 1995
2 Štadión pod Zoborom, Nitra 27 March 1996 24 May 2000
2 Lokomotíva Stadium, Košice 19 August 1998 5 September 1998
2 Mestský štadión, Dubnica 8 September 1999 13 October 2007
1 Štadión na Sihoti, Trenčín 5 September 2001 5 September 2001
1 Štadión 1. FC Tatran Prešov, Prešov 14 May 2002 14 May 2002
1 Štadión FC ViOn, Zlaté Moravce 26 March 2008 26 March 2008
1 NTC Senec, Senec 23 May 2014 23 May 2014

Nickname

In Slovakia, the team is typically referred to as the Repre (Representation) or Národný tím (National team).

Kit

Slovakia kits from 1939–45 era

Slovakia's home kit since the 1993 was blue, but currently Slovakia changed their home kit from blue to white. The team wears either a set of white jerseys, shorts and socks or a set of blue jerseys, shorts and socks. A combination of a blue jersey and white shorts has also been used in some matches. The official shirt supplier is Puma which has signed a long-term agreement with the Slovak Association until 2026.

Name Duration
Le Coq Sportif 1993–1995
Nike 1995–2005
Adidas 2006–2011
Puma 2012 – at least 2026

Tournament records

World Cup record

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup Qualification record
Year Results Position Pld W D L GF GA Pos Pld W D L GF GA
1998 Did not qualify 4th 10 5 1 4 18 14
2002 3rd 10 5 2 3 16 9
2006 2nd 14 6 6 2 26 14
2010 Round of 16 16 4 1 1 2 5 7 1st 10 7 1 2 22 10
2014 Did not qualify 3rd 10 3 4 3 11 10
Total Round of 16 1/5 4 1 1 2 5 7 54 26 14 14 93 57

European Championship record

UEFA Euro record UEFA Euro Qualification record
Year Results Position Pld W D L GF GA Pos Pld W D L GF GA
1996 Did not qualify 3rd 10 4 2 4 14 18
2000 3rd 10 5 2 3 12 9
2004 3rd 8 3 1 4 11 9
2008 4th 12 5 1 6 33 23
2012 4th 10 4 3 3 7 10
2016 Qualified 0 0 0 0 0 0 2nd 10 7 1 2 17 8
Total 1/6 60 28 10 22 94 77

Olympic Games

Host nation(s) / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA
1996 Did not qualify
2000 Group stage 3 1 0 2 3 6
2004 Did not qualify
2008
2012
Total 1/4 3 1 0 2 3 6

Results and schedule

The box below, show the results of all A-level matches played within the last 12 months, and the scheduled matches for the nearest future.

Date Venue Opponent Competition Score* Goalscorer(s) Attendance
4 September 2014 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Malta International Friendly 1–0 W Nemec 3,509
8 September 2014 Olympic Stadium, Kiev, Ukraine  Ukraine UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 1–0 W Mak 38,454
9 October 2014 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Spain UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 2–1 W Kucka Stoch 9,478
12 October 2014 Borisov Arena, Barysaw, Belarus  Belarus UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 3–1 W Hamšík Šesták 4,500
15 November 2014 Philip II Arena, Skopje, Macedonia  Macedonia UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 2–0 W Kucka Nemec 11,322
18 November 2014 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Finland International Friendly 2–1 W Hološko Hamšík 3,998
27 March 2015 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Luxembourg UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 3–0 W Nemec Weiss Pekarík 9,524
31 March 2015 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Czech Republic International Friendly 1–0 W Duda 10,594
14 June 2015 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Macedonia UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 2–1 W Saláta Hamšík 10,765
5 September 2015 Estadio Carlos Tartiere, Oviedo, Spain  Spain UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 0–2 L 20,000
8 September 2015 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Ukraine UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 0–0 D 10,648
9 October 2015 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Belarus UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 0–1 L 9,859
12 October 2015 Stade Josy Barthel, Luxembourg, Luxembourg  Luxembourg UEFA Euro 2016 qualification 2–4 W Hamšík Nemec Mak Hamšík 2,512
13 November 2015 Štadión Antona Malatinského, Trnava, Slovakia   Switzerland International Friendly
17 November 2015 Štadión pod Dubňom, Žilina, Slovakia  Iceland International Friendly

* Slovakia score always listed first

2014 FIFA World Cup qualifying

Team
Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 10 8 1 1 30 6 +24 25
 Greece 10 8 1 1 12 4 +8 25
 Slovakia 10 3 4 3 11 10 +1 13
 Lithuania 10 3 2 5 9 11 −2 11
 Latvia 10 2 2 6 10 20 −10 8
 Liechtenstein 10 0 2 8 4 25 −21 2
 
Bosnia and Herzegovina  3–1 4–1 4–1 3–0 0–1
Greece  0–0 1–0 2–0 2–0 1–0
Latvia  0–5 1–2 2–0 2–1 2–2
Liechtenstein  1–8 0–1 1–1 0–2 1–1
Lithuania  0–1 0–1 2–0 2–0 1–1
Slovakia  1–2 0–1 2–1 2–0 1–1


2016 UEFA Euro qualifying

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 10 9 0 1 23 3 +20 27 Qualify for final tournament 2–0 1–0 3–0 4–0 5–1
2  Slovakia 10 7 1 2 17 8 +9 22 2–1 0–0 0–1 3–0 2–1
3  Ukraine 10 6 1 3 14 4 +10 19 Advance to play-offs 0–1 0–1 3–1 3–0 1–0
4  Belarus 10 3 2 5 8 14 −6 11 0–1 1–3 0–2 2–0 0–0
5  Luxembourg 10 1 1 8 6 27 −21 4 0–4 2–4 0–3 1–1 1–0
6  Macedonia 10 1 1 8 6 18 −12 4 0–1 0–2 0–2 1–2 3–2
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

All-time team record

The following table shows Slovakia's all-time international record, correct as of 12 October 2015.

Opponents Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD
 Algeria 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 Andorra 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2
 Armenia 2 0 0 2 1 7 −6
 Australia 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
 Austria 3 1 1 1 3 4 −1
 Azerbaijan 6 5 0 1 12 4 +8
 Belarus 3 2 0 1 7 2 +5
 Belgium 3 0 2 1 3 4 −1
 Bolivia 3 2 0 1 3 1 +2
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 4 1 0 3 4 6 −2
 Brazil 1 0 0 1 0 5 −5
 Bulgaria 7 4 1 2 10 5 +5
 Cameroon 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 Chile 2 1 0 1 3 2 +1
 Colombia 3 0 1 2 0 2 −2
 Costa Rica 3 1 1 1 5 6 −1
 Croatia 13 2 3 8 17 33 −16
 Cyprus 4 3 0 1 14 6 +8
 Czech Republic 10 3 2 5 10 21 −11
 Denmark 2 1 0 1 4 3 +1
 Egypt 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 England 3 0 0 3 2 8 −6
 Estonia 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2
 Faroe Islands 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4
 Finland 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3
 France 4 1 1 2 2 6 −4
 Georgia 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2
 Germany 10 2 0 8 9 22 −13
 Gibraltar 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
 Greece 4 1 1 2 4 5 −1
 Guatemala 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Hungary 4 2 2 0 3 1 +2
 Iceland 4 2 1 1 7 5 +2
 Iran 2 1 0 1 6 6 0
 Republic of Ireland 4 0 3 1 3 4 −1
 Israel 4 3 1 0 7 3 +4
 Italy 2 1 0 1 3 5 −2
 Japan 3 0 1 2 2 5 −3
 Latvia 4 3 1 0 10 4 +6
 Liechtenstein 10 7 3 0 27 2 +25
 Lithuania 2 0 2 0 2 2 0
 Luxembourg 5 4 0 1 15 5 +10
 Macedonia 8 6 2 0 16 2 +14
 Malta 6 5 1 0 15 2 +13
 Moldova 3 2 0 1 5 4 +1
 Montenegro 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2
 Morocco 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1
 Netherlands 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3
 New Zealand 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 Northern Ireland 3 2 0 1 4 3 +2
 Norway 2 0 0 2 0 3 −3
 Paraguay 1 0 0 2 0 2 −2
 Peru 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1
 Poland 8 4 1 3 12 13 −1
 Portugal 4 0 1 3 1 7 −6
 Romania 11 1 5 5 12 20 −8
 Russia 8 2 3 3 6 7 −1
 San Marino 4 4 0 0 22 1 +21
 Saudi Arabia 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 Serbia and Montenegro 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2
 Slovenia 4 0 2 2 2 5 −3
 South Korea 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
 Spain 6 1 1 4 6 15 −9
 Sweden 4 0 2 2 1 4 −3
  Switzerland 2 1 0 1 1 2 −1
 Thailand 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 Turkey 5 1 1 3 3 7 −4
 Ukraine 5 1 3 1 5 5 0
 United Arab Emirates 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2
 United States 3 1 1 1 5 5 0
 Uzbekistan 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3
 Wales 2 1 0 1 7 6 +1
 Yugoslavia 2 0 1 1 1 3 −2

Players

Current squad

24 players were named in the squad for the UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying matches against Belarus on October 9 and Luxembourg on October 12, 2015.[6]

Caps and goals as of 12 October 2015 after the match against Luxembourg.
0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Ján Mucha (1982-12-05) 5 December 1982 43 0 Slovan Bratislava
1GK Matúš Kozáčik (1983-12-27) 27 December 1983 14 0 Viktoria Plzeň
1GK Ján Novota (1983-11-29) 29 November 1983 1 0 Rapid Wien
2DF Martin Škrtel (Captain) (1984-12-15) 15 December 1984 76 5 Liverpool
2DF Ján Ďurica (1981-12-10) 10 December 1981 74 4 Lokomotiv Moscow
2DF Tomáš Hubočan (1985-09-17) 17 September 1985 42 0 Dynamo Moscow
2DF Kornel Saláta (1985-01-24) 24 January 1985 34 2 Slovan Bratislava
2DF Dušan Švento (1985-08-01) 1 August 1985 34 1 1. FC Köln
2DF Norbert Gyömbér (1992-07-03) 3 July 1992 10 0 Roma
2DF Lukáš Tesák (1985-03-08) 8 March 1985 1 0 Arsenal Tula
3MF Marek Hamšík (Vice-Captain) (1987-07-27) 27 July 1987 82 17 Napoli
3MF Miroslav Stoch (1989-10-19) 19 October 1989 51 5 Bursaspor
3MF Vladimír Weiss (1989-11-30) 30 November 1989 46 4 Lekhwiya
3MF Juraj Kucka (1987-02-26) 26 February 1987 44 4 Milan
3MF Viktor Pečovský (1983-05-24) 24 May 1983 28 1 Žilina
3MF Róbert Mak (1991-03-08) 8 March 1991 22 4 PAOK
3MF Patrik Hrošovský (1992-04-22) 22 April 1992 5 0 Viktoria Plzeň
3MF Ondrej Duda (1994-12-05) 5 December 1994 5 1 Legia Warsaw
3MF Erik Sabo (1991-11-22) 22 November 1991 4 0 PAOK
3MF Ján Greguš (1991-01-29) 29 January 1991 2 0 Baumit Jablonec
4FW Stanislav Šesták (1982-12-16) 16 December 1982 61 13 Ferencváros
4FW Martin Jakubko (1980-02-26) 26 February 1980 39 9 Ružomberok
4FW Michal Ďuriš (1988-06-01) 1 June 1988 20 0 Viktoria Plzeň
4FW Adam Nemec (1985-09-02) 2 September 1985 18 4 Willem II

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the Slovakia squad within the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Martin Dúbravka (1989-01-05) 5 January 1989 1 0 Esbjerg v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
GK Tomáš Košický (1986-03-11) 11 March 1986 1 0 Asteras Tripoli v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
DF Peter Pekarík (1986-10-30) 30 October 1986 63 2 Hertha Berlin v.  Ukraine, 8 September 2015
DF Ľubomír Michalík (1983-08-13) 13 August 1983 8 2 Dunajská Streda v.  Ukraine, 8 September 2015
DF Michal Breznaník (1985-12-16) 16 December 1985 10 0 Sparta Prague v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
DF Lukáš Pauschek (1992-12-09) 9 December 1992 4 0 Bohemians 1905 v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
DF Pavol Farkaš (1985-03-27) 27 March 1985 2 0 Skoda Xanthi v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
DF Matúš Čonka (1990-10-15) 15 October 1990 0 0 Spartak Trnava v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
DF Jakub Holúbek (1991-01-12) 12 January 1991 0 0 Trenčín v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
DF Jozef Piaček (1983-06-20) 20 June 1983 0 0 Žilina v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 INJ
MF Karim Guédé (1985-01-07) 7 January 1985 14 0 SC Freiburg v.  Macedonia, 14 June 2015 PRE
MF Filip Kiss (1990-10-13) 13 October 1990 8 0 Haugesund v.  Macedonia, 14 June 2015 PRE
MF Erik Jendrišek (1986-10-26) 26 October 1986 37 4 Cracovia v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
MF Tomáš Ďubek (1987-01-22) 22 January 1987 1 0 Ružomberok v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
MF Manuel Khuba (1988-05-16) 16 May 1988 15 4 Slovan Bratislava v.  Macedonia, 27 March 2015 PRE
MF Ján Vlasko (1990-11-11) 11 November 1990 0 0 Zagłębie Lubin v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
FW Róbert Vittek (1982-04-01) 1 April 1982 81 23 Slovan Bratislava v.  Ukraine, 8 September 2015
FW Filip Hološko (1984-01-17) 17 January 1984 65 8 Sydney FC v.  Macedonia, 14 June 2015
FW Jakub Sylvestr (1989-02-02) 2 February 1989 5 0 1. FC Nürnberg v.  Macedonia, 14 June 2015 PRE
FW Marek Bakoš (1983-04-15) 15 April 1983 13 0 Slovan Liberec v.  Luxembourg, 27 March 2015 PRE
  • INJ Withdrew due to an injury.
  • PRE Preliminary squad.
  • RET Retired from international football.

Player statistics

Players in bold are still active.

As of 12 October 2015.
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