World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Sheep farming

Article Id: WHEBN0000915258
Reproduction Date:

Title: Sheep farming  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: East Falkland, Pastoralist, Vatnsfjörður, Portland Island (New Zealand), Mackenzie Basin
Collection: Animal Breeding, Sheep
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Sheep farming

Sheep rearing is the raising and breeding of domestic sheep. It is a branch of animal husbandry. Sheep are raised principally for their meat (lamb and mutton), milk (sheep's milk), and fiber (wool). They also yield sheepskin and parchment.

Contents

  • Sheep production worldwide 1
    • U.S. sheep production 1.1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Sheep production worldwide

Flock of sheep moving through a city early on a holiday morning
Yörük shepherd in the Taurus Mountains

According to the mainland China (146.5 million heads), Australia (101.1 million), India (62.1 million), Iran (51.7 million), and the former Sudan (46.2 million).[1]

In 2013, the five countries with the largest number of heads of sheep were mainland China (175 million), Australia (75.5 million), India (53.8 million), the former Sudan (52.5 million), and Iran (50.2 million). In 2013, the number of heads of sheep were distributed as follows: 44% in Asia, 28.2% in Africa; 11.2% in Europe, 9.1% in Oceania, 7.4% in the Americas.[1]

The top producers of sheep meat (average from 1993 to 2013) were as follows: mainland China (1.6 million); Australia (618,000), New Zealand (519,000), the United Kingdom (335,000), and Turkey (288,857).[1] The top five producers of sheep meat in 2013 were mainland China (2 million), Australia (660,000), New Zealand (450,000), the former Sudan (325,000), and Turkey (295,000).[1]

U.S. sheep production

In the United States, inventory data on sheep began in 1867, when 45 million head of sheep were counted in the United States.[2] The numbers of sheep peaked in 1884 at 51 million head, and then declined over time to almost 6 million head.[2]

Since the 1960s, per capita consumption of lamb and mutton declined from nearly 5 pounds to just about 1 pound, due to competition from poultry, pork, beef, and other meats.[2] Since the 1990s, U.S. sheep operations declined from around 105,000 to around 80,000 due to shrinking revenues and low rates of return.[2] According to the Economic Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, the "sheep industry accounts for less than 1 percent of U.S. livestock industry receipts."[2]

See also

A World War I-era poster sponsored by the USDA encouraging children to raise sheep to provide needed war supplies.

References

  1. ^ a b c d FAOSTAT database.
  2. ^ a b c d e Sheep, Lamb & Mutton: Background, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service (last updated May 26, 2012).

External links

  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
  • Sheep at DMOZ
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.