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Savitri Brata

 

Savitri Brata

Savitri Brata
Savitri begs Yama for Satyavan's life.
Also called Savitri Osha
Observed by Oriya people, Nepali Maithili women[1]
Date Jyeshta Amavasya
2014 date 28 May
2015 date 17 May
Related to Savitri and Satyavan

Savitri Brata (Oriya: ସାବିତ୍ରୀ ଓଷା or ସାବିତ୍ରୀ ବ୍ରତ) or Savitri Amavasya (Oriya: ସାବିତ୍ରୀ ଅମାବାସ୍ୟା) is a fasting day observed by married Hindu Oriya women and Nepali women of Mithila on the Amavasya, the no moon day in the Hindu month of Jyestha.

Married Hindu women, whose husbands are alive, observe it as a vow with great dedication and pray for their husband to have a long life. The word reflects the origin and significance of the Vat-Savitri puja. The fast is dedicated to Savitri and Satyavan; her husband who was destined to die within one year but was brought back to life by her penance. The God of death, Yama, is implored by Savitri when he is about to leave his body. Due to her sheer determination and devotion to her husband, she won him back to life. Soon Satyavan regained his lost kingdom.

The same festival is observed on Vat Purnima, the full moon of Jyestha in other regions.

Contents

  • Legend behind the festival 1
  • Customs and rituals 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Legend behind the festival

The vrata was named after Savitri. Savitri was the beautiful daughter of King Aswapati of Madra Desa. She selected Satyavan as her life partner, a prince in exile who was living in the forest with his blind father Dyumatsen. She left the palace and lived with her husband and the in-laws in the forest. As a devoted wife and daughter-in-law, she went to great lengths to take care of them. One day while cutting wood in the jungle, Satyavan's head reeled and he fell down from a tree. Then Yamraj, the death God, appeared to take away Satyavan's soul. Deeply hurt, Savitri pleaded to Yamraj not to be separated from her husband. If anything, he would take away the soul of her husband and she would also follow. Yamraj, moved by the devotion of Savitri, returned the life of her husband.

Customs and rituals

All Hindu women observe this festival by worshiping and propitiating Savitri as a Devi. In the early morning, women take purifying baths, wear new clothes and bangles, and apply vermilion to their foreheads. Nine types of fruits and nine types of flowers are offered to the Goddess. Wet pulses, rice, mangos, jackfruits, palm fruits, kendu, bananas and several other fruits are offered as Bhoga (offering) and observe the festival with Savitri barta katha. After fasting for the whole day, the fasting women simply take the Bhoga. In the afternoon, when formalities of worship are over, they bow to their respective husbands and elderly people.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Nepali women gathers in Mithila for Satisabitri Brata". 

External links

  • Download 'Savitri Brata Katha' in Oriya and English from Oriyanari.com
  • Festivals of Orissa
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