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Saint Matthias

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Saint Matthias

Matthias
Saint Matthias from the workshop of Simone Martini
Apostle
Born 1st century AD
Judaea, Roman Empire
Died c. 80 AD
Georgia)
Honored in
Roman Catholic Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
Oriental Orthodox Churches
Anglican Communion
Lutheran Church
Canonized Pre-Congregation
Feast May 14 (Roman Catholic Church, Anglican Communion)
August 9 (Eastern Orthodox Church)
February 24 (in leap years February 25) (pre-1970 General Roman Calendar, Episcopal Church, Lutheran Church)
Attributes axe
Patronage alcoholism; carpenters; Gary, Indiana; Great Falls-Billings, Montana; smallpox; tailors; hope; perseverance

Matthias (Hebrew transliteration: Mattityahu[1]; died c. 80), according to the Acts of the Apostles, was the apostle chosen by the remaining eleven apostles to replace Judas Iscariot following Judas' betrayal of Jesus and suicide.[2] His calling as an apostle is unique in that his appointment was not made personally by Jesus, who had already ascended to heaven, and, it was made before the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the early Church.

Biography

There is no mention of a Matthias among the lists of disciples or followers of Jesus in the three synoptic gospels. According to Acts, he had been with Jesus from his baptism by John to the Ascension. In the days following, Peter proposed that the assembled disciples, who numbered about one hundred and twenty, nominate two men to replace Judas. They chose Joseph called Barsabas (whose surname was Justus) and Matthias. Then they prayed, "Thou, Lord, which knowest the hearts of all [men], shew whether of these two thou hast chosen, That he may take part of this ministry and apostleship, from which Judas by transgression fell, that he might go to his own place." Then they cast lots, and the lot fell to Matthias; so he was numbered with the eleven apostles.[3] Matthias was present with the other apostles at Pentecost.[4]

No further information about Matthias is to be found in the canonical New Testament. Even his name is variable: the Syriac version of Eusebius calls him throughout not Matthias but "Tolmai", not to be confused with Bartholomew (which means Son of Tolmai) who was originally one of the twelve Apostles; Clement of Alexandria says some identified him with Zacchaeus; the Clementine Recognitions identify him with Barnabas; Hilgenfeld thinks he is the same as Nathanael in the Gospel of John.

Ministry

The tradition of the Greeks says that St. Matthias planted the faith about Cappadocia and on the coasts of the Caspian sea, residing chiefly near the port Issus.[4]

According to Adjara claims that Matthias is buried at that site.

The Synopsis of Dorotheus contains this tradition: "Matthias preached the Gospel to barbarians and meat-eaters in the interior of Ethiopia, where the sea harbor of Hyssus is, at the mouth of the river Phasis. He died at Sebastopolis, and was buried there, near the Temple of the Sun."[3]

Alternatively, another tradition maintains that Matthias was stoned at Jerusalem by the Jews, and then beheaded (cf. Tillemont, Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire ecclesiastique des six premiers siècles, I, 406–7). According to Hippolytus of Rome, Matthias died of old age in Jerusalem.

Clement of Alexandria observed (Stromateis vi.13.):

Not that they became apostles through being chosen for some distinguished peculiarity of nature, since also Judas was chosen along with them. But they were capable of becoming apostles on being chosen by Him who foresees even ultimate issues. Matthias, accordingly, who was not chosen along with them, on showing himself worthy of becoming an apostle, is substituted for Judas.

Writings

Surviving fragments of the lost Gospel of Matthias[7] attribute it to Matthias, but Early Church Fathers attributed it to heretical writings in the 2nd century.

Veneration

The feast of Saint Matthias was included in the Roman Calendar in the 11th century and celebrated on the sixth day to the Calends of March (February 24 usually, but February 25 in leap years). In the revision of the General Roman Calendar in 1969, his feast was transferred to May 14, so as not to celebrate it in Lent but instead in Eastertide close to the Solemnity of the Ascension,[8] the event after which the Acts of the Apostles recounts that Matthias was selected to be ranked with the Twelve Apostles.

The Eastern Orthodox Church celebrates his feast on August 9.

The Church of England's Book of Common Prayer liturgy, as well as others in the Anglican Communion,[9] celebrates Matthias on February 24. According to the newer Common Worship liturgy, he is celebrated on May 14 with a Festival, although he may be celebrated on February 24, if desired.[10] In the Episcopal Church as well as some in the Lutheran Church, including the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod and the Lutheran Church–Canada, his feast remains on February 24.[11] In Evangelical Lutheran Worship, used by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America as well as the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, the feast date for Matthias is on May 14.[12]

It is claimed that St Matthias the Apostle's remains are interred in the Georgia.

References

  1. ^ Acts 1
  2. ^ Acts 1:18–26
  3. ^ a b c Jacque Eugène. Jacquier, "St. Matthias." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 10. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. 10 Aug. 2014
  4. ^ a b Butler, Alban. "Saint Matthias, Apostle", The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs and Other Principal Saints, D. & J. Sadlier, & Company, 1864
  5. ^ The Ethiopia/Aethiopia mentioned here as well as in the quote from the "Synopsis of Dorotheus" is that region identified with an ancient Egyptian military colony in the Caucasus mountains on the river Alazani.
  6. ^ See "Egyptian Colony and Language in the Caucasus and its Anthropological Relations," by Hyde Clarke, 1874
  7. ^ "The Traditions of Matthias". Earlychristianwritings.com. Retrieved 2011-05-12. 
  8. ^ "Calendarium Romanum" (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 92; cf. p. 117
  9. ^ The Calendar – The Prayer Book Society of Canada
  10. ^ "web site". Oremus.org. Retrieved 2011-05-12. 
  11. ^ The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod web site
  12. ^ Evangelical Lutheran Worship, (Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 2007), 15
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