World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Rice and curry

Article Id: WHEBN0000585117
Reproduction Date:

Title: Rice and curry  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Curd rice, Curry, Sambar (dish), Vada (food), Pilaf
Collection: Bangladeshi Cuisine, Indian Rice Dishes, South Asian Curries, South Indian Cuisine, Sri Lankan Cuisine
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Rice and curry

Rice and curry
A rice and curry dish
Type Curry
Main ingredients Rice or kiribath, vegetable or meat curry, spices (chili peppers, cardamom, cumin, coriander)
 

Rice and curry is a popular dish in the Southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu, as well as in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

Rice and curry dinner comprises the following:

  • A large bowl of rice, most often boiled, but frequently fried. Sometimes Kiribath, rice cooked in coconut milk, is served.
  • A vegetable curry, perhaps of green beans, jackfruit or leeks.
  • A curry of meat, most often chicken or fish but occasionally goat or lamb
  • Dhal, a dish of spiced lentils
  • Papadums, a thin crisp wafer made from legume or rice flour and served as a side dish.
  • Sambals, which are fresh chutney side dishes; they may include red onion, chili, grated coconut, lime juice, and are often the hottest part of the meal.

Each bowl contains small portions, but as is traditional in most of tropical Asia, if a bowl is emptied, it is immediately refilled.

The food uses chili peppers, cardamom, cumin, coriander and other spices. It has a distinctive taste. The cuisines uses ingredients like dried fish which are local to the area. The spicier preparations are believed to be among the world's hottest in terms of chilli content (second only to Sylheti). While natives are born into this cuisine and develop a healthy tolerance to spicy food, many visitors and tourists to the country often find the spiciness excessive. As a result, many local restaurants in developed

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.