World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council

Article Id: WHEBN0014216743
Reproduction Date:

Title: Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Payment card industry, CCNA, ELearnSecurity, Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, Offensive Security Certified Professional
Collection: Information Privacy, Payment Cards
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council

The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council was originally formed by American Express, Discover Financial Services, JCB, MasterCard Worldwide and Visa International on September 7, 2006, with the goal of managing the ongoing evolution of the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard. The council itself claims to be independent of the various card vendors that make up the council.

The PCI Council formed a body of security standards known as the PCI Data Security Standards, (PCI DSS), and these standards consist of 12 significant requirements including multiple sub-requirements which contain numerous directives against which businesses may measure their own payment card security policies, procedures and guidelines. By complying with qualified assessments (see QSA) of these standards, businesses can become accepted by the PCI Standards Council as compliant with the 12 requirements, and thus receive a compliance certification and a listing on the PCI Standards Council website. Compliance efforts and acceptance must be completed on a periodic basis. (See PCI DSS.)

Membership and Participation

Members of the PCI Security Standards Council currently consist of the five major payment brands: Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, and JCB. The executives and management of the PCI SSC are also filled by employees of the aforementioned payment brands.

Interested parties can participate in the development of the PCI security standards through registration as a Participatory Organization. These participants are organized into Special Interest Groups which are tasked with recommending revisions to and the further development of the various security standards maintained by the council.

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.