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Passport of the European Union

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Passport of the European Union

The European Union does not issue passports, but ordinary passports issued by its 28 member states share a common design.[1] Common features include the burgundy coloured cover, the use of the words "European Union" in the country's official language or languages on the cover, as well as common security features and biometrics.[2]

Some EU member states also issue non-EU passports to certain people who have a nationality which does not render them citizens of the European Union (e.g., British Overseas Territories Citizens except those with a connection to Gibraltar, British Nationals (Overseas), British Overseas Citizens, British Protected Persons and British Subjects).[3]

In addition, the European Commission issues European Union Laissez-Passers to the members and certain civil servants of its institutions.

Use

With a valid passport, EU citizens are entitled to exercise the right of free movement in the European Economic Area (European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway) and Switzerland, without a visa.

As an alternative to holding a passport, EU citizens can also use a valid national identity card to enter and reside in the EEA (EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway) and Switzerland without a visa.

Strictly speaking, it is not necessary for an EU citizen to possess a valid passport or national identity card to enjoy the right of free movement. In theory, if an EU citizen can prove his/her nationality/identification by any other means (e.g. by presenting an expired passport or national identity card, or a citizenship certificate), he/she must be permitted to enter and reside in the EEA without a visa. An EU citizen who is unable to demonstrate his/her nationality satisfactorily must nonetheless be given 'every reasonable opportunity' to obtain the necessary documents or to have them delivered within a reasonable period of time.[4][5][6]

When entering some EEA countries, EU citizens possessing valid biometric passports are able to use automated gates instead of immigration counters. For example, when entering the United Kingdom, at major airports, adult holders of EU biometric passports can use ePassport gates, whilst all other EU citizens (such as those using a national identity card or a non-biometric passport) must use an immigration counter.[7]

Common design features

Since the 1980s, European Union member states have started to harmonise the following aspects of the designs of their ordinary passports (but not other types of passports, such as diplomatic, service and emergency passports):[1]

Overall format

  • Paper size B7 (ISO/IEC 7810 ID-3, 88 mm × 125 mm)
  • 32 pages (passports with more pages can be issued to frequent travellers)
  • Colour of cover: burgundy red

Cover

Information on the cover, in this order, in the language(s) of the issuing state:

  • The words "EUROPEAN UNION" (before 1997: "EUROPEAN COMMUNITY")
  • Name of the issuing state (similar typeface as "EUROPEAN UNION")
  • Emblem of the state
  • The word "PASSPORT"
  • The Biometric Passport symbol

First page

Information on the first page, in one or more of the languages of the European Union:

  • The words "EUROPEAN UNION"
  • Name of the issuing state (similar typeface to that of "European Union")
  • The word "PASSPORT"
  • Serial number (may also be repeated on the other pages)

Identification page

Information on the (possibly laminated) identification page, in the languages of the issuing state plus English and French, accompanied by numbers that refer to an index that lists the meaning of these fields in all official EU languages:

1. Surname 2. Forename(s)
3. Nationality 4. Date of birth
5. Sex 6. Place of birth
7. Date of issue     8. Date of expiry
9. Authority 10. Signature of holder

Following page

Optional information on the following page:

11. Residence 12. Height
13. Colour of eyes     14. Extension of the passport
15. Name at birth (if now using married name or have legally changed names)

Remaining pages

  • The following page is reserved for:
    • Details concerning the spouse of the holder of the passport (where a family passport is issued)
    • Details concerning children accompanying the holder (name, first name, date of birth, sex)
    • Photographs of the faces of spouse and children
  • The following page is reserved for use by the issuing authorities
  • The following page carries the index that translates the field numbers into the official languages of the EU
  • The remaining pages are reserved for visa
  • The inside back cover is reserved for additional information or recommendations by the issuing state in its own official language(s)

Overview of passports issued by 28 Member States

Member state Passport cover Biodata page Cost Validity Issuing authority Latest version
Austria Austria
  • 75,90€ (36 pages)
  • 10 years (aged 12 or over)
  • 5 years (aged 2–11)
  • 2 years (aged 0–2)
16 June 2006
Belgium Belgium

  • 71 € (adults; 32 pages; in Belgium)
  • 41 € (children; 32 pages; in Belgium)
  • 240 € (adults; 64 pages; in Belgium)
  • 210 € (children; 64 pages; in Belgium)
  • 79 € (adults; 32 pages; overseas)
  • 35 € (children; 32 pages; overseas)
  • 240 € (adults; 64 pages; overseas)
  • 210 € (children; 64 pages; overseas)[8]
  • 5 years
  • Communes (in Belgium)
  • Belgian embassies and consulates (overseas)
1 February 2008
Bulgaria Bulgaria

  • 40BGN / 20€ (adults aged 14–58; 32 pages)
  • 20BGN / 10€ (adults under 14; 32 pages)
  • 5 years

Ministry of Interior Affairs

29 March 2010
Croatia Croatia

  • 390 HRK
  • 10 years (adults aged 21 or over)
  • 5 years (adults aged under 21)
  • Ministry of the Interior Affairs of the Republic of Croatia
1 July 2009
Cyprus Cyprus
  • (€70; 32 pages)
  • 10 years
  • Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Embassies and High Commissions of the Republic of Cyprus
29 November 2010
Czech Republic Czech Republic[9]

  • CZK 600 (adults aged 15 or over)
  • CZK 100 (children under 15)
  • 10 years (adults aged 15 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 15)
  • the town hall of the applicant's place of permanent residence
  • abroad: consulates of the Czech Republic (except honorary consulates)
1 September 2006
Denmark Denmark

  • DKK 625 (adults aged 18 or over; 32 pages)
  • DKK 140 (children aged under 18; 32 pages)
  • 10 years (adults)
  • 5 years (children under 18)
1 January 2012
Estonia Estonia

  • 28,76 €
  • 5 years
22 May 2007
Finland Finland

21 August 2012
Åland Islands Åland Islands

  • 5 years
21 August 2012
France France

  • 10 years (adults)
  • 5 years (children under 18)
  • Préfecture offices (but forms can be addressed to any city hall)
  • French consulates (abroad)
12 April 2006
Germany Germany

  • 37,50 € (applicants under 24; 32 pages)
  • 59 € (adults aged 24 or over; 32 pages)
  • 10 years (adults aged 24 or over)
  • 6 years (applicants under 24)
Municipal registration office 11 November 2007
Greece Greece

  • 84,40€ (adults)
  • 73,60€ (children)
  • 5 years (applicants aged 15 or over)
  • 2 years (children under 15)
National Passport Centre ("Διεύθυνση Διαβατηρίων/Αρχηγείο Ελληνικής Αστυνομίας") 28 August 2006
Hungary Hungary

  • 7500 HUF (5 years)
  • 14000 HUF (10 years)
  • 5 years
  • 10 years

Registration Office (Nyilvántartó Hivatal)

1 March 2012
Republic of Ireland Ireland

  • 10 years (adults)
  • 3 or 5 years (children)
Consular and Passport Division of the Department of Foreign Affairs
Italy Italy

  • 10 years (adults aged 18 or over)
  • 5 years (applicants aged 3-17)
  • 3 years (children under 3)[13]
Minister of Foreign Affairs through
  • Local quaestor (in Italy)
  • Consulates and embassies (abroad)[14]
20 May 2010
Latvia Latvia

  • 10 years (adults aged 60 or over)
  • 5 years (applicants aged 5–59)
  • 2 years (children under 5)
20 November 2007
Lithuania Lithuania

  • 150LTL/48€ (adults; 32 pages;)
  • 75LTL/24€ (children; 32 pages;)
  • 200LTL/65€ (adults; 32 pages; issued in five working days)
  • 250LTL/79€ (adults; 32 pages; issued in 24 hours)
  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children aged 5–15)
  • 2 years (children under 5)
27 January 2011
Luxembourg Luxembourg
  • 30€ (5-year passports)
  • 20€ (2-year passports)
  • 5 years (applicants aged 4 or over)
  • 2 years (applicants under 4)
Passport Office, Luxembourg 1 July 2011
Malta Malta 29 September 2008
Netherlands The Netherlands

  • 50.35€ (maximum, all ages 34-page passport; individual municipalities determine the rate[15])
  • 84.88€ (adults; 34 pages; overseas[16])
  • 5 years (will become 10 years in the near future)[17]
  • Gemeente (Municipality)
9 October 2011
Poland Poland

Application made within Poland:
  • 140 zł (for applicants aged between 13 and 70)
  • 30 zł (for applicants aged under 13)

Application made through a Polish consulate:

  • 106 € (applicants aged between 13 and 70)
  • 36 € (applicants aged under 13)

In both cases:

  • free for applicants aged 70 and over
  • certain classes of applicants qualify for a 50% discount of a relevant fee
  • 10 years (applicants aged 13 and over)
  • 5 years (applicants aged under 13)
  • Governor of a province (voivodeship)
  • Consul
1 January 2006
Portugal Portugal

120px

  • 5 years (applicants aged 5 or over)
  • 2 years (children under 5)
25 May 2009
Romania Romania

  • 276 RON / 59€ (5-year passports)
  • 116 RON / 25€ (1-year passports)
  • 5 years (applicants aged 6 or over)
  • 3 years (applicants under 6)
  • 1-year (temporary passport)
Ministry of Administration and Interior (General Directorate for Passports) 26 April 2006
Slovakia Slovakia
  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children aged 5–15)
  • 2 years (children under 5)
15 January 2008
Slovenia Slovenia

28 August 2006
Spain Spain

  • 25€
  • No expiry (adults over 70)
  • 10 years (adults aged 30–70)
  • 5 years (applicants under 30)
14 August 2006
Sweden Sweden
  • 350 SEK
  • 5 years
  • Swedish Police Authority
2 January 2012
United Kingdom United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom

  • £72.50 (adults; 32 pages)
  • £85.50 (adults; 48 pages)
  • £46 (children)

Western European Passport Service: Paris Embassy

  • €170 (exc. courier fee) (adults; 32 pages)
  • €205 (exc. courier fee) (adults; 48 pages)
  • €108 (exc. courier fee) (children)
  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 16)
5 October 2010
Gibraltar Gibraltar

  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 16)
Civil Status and Registration Office, Gibraltar 6 September 2006
Guernsey Guernsey
(Note that only those who have a connection to the United Kingdom (e.g. they have lived in the UK for five years, or born in the UK, or have parents or grandparents born in the UK) are EU citizens.)

  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 16)
Passport Office of the Customs and Immmigration Department 25 September 2006
Isle of Man Isle of Man
(Note that only those who have a connection to the United Kingdom (e.g. they have lived in the UK for five years, or born in the UK, or have parents or grandparents born in the UK) are EU citizens.)

  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 16)
Chief Secretary's Office of the Isle of Man Government 6 October 2006
Jersey Jersey
(Note that only those who have a connection to the United Kingdom (e.g. they have lived in the UK for five years, or born in the UK, or have parents or grandparents born in the UK) are EU citizens.)

  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 16)
Passport Office, Jersey Government 9 October 2006

Gallery of EU passports

See also

References

External links

  • EU Citizenship by Investing
  • European Passports in PRADO (The Council of the European Union Public Register of Authentic Travel and Identity Documents Online)

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