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Nurse educator

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Title: Nurse educator  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, American Nurses Credentialing Center, Nursing literature, Nursing school
Collection: Nursing Educators, Nursing Specialties
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Nurse educator

A nurse educator is a nurse who teaches and prepares licensed practical nurses (LPN) and registered nurses (RN) for entry into practice positions. They can also teach in various patient care settings to provide continuing education to licensed nursing staff. Nurse Educators teach in graduate programs at Master’s and doctoral level which prepare advanced practice nurses, nurse educators, nurse administrators, nurse researchers, and leaders in complex healthcare and educational organizations.

The type of degree required for a nurse educator may be dependent upon the governing nurse practice act or upon the regulatory agencies that define the practice of nursing. In the United States, one such agency is the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.[1] For instance, faculty in the U.S. may be able to teach in an LPN program with an associate degree in nursing. Most baccalaureate and higher degree programs require a minimum of a graduate degree and prefer the doctorate for full-time teaching positions. Many nurse educators have a clinical specialty background blended with coursework in education. Many schools offer the Nurse Educator track which focuses on educating nurses going into any type setting. Individuals may complete a post-Master’s certificate in education to complement their clinical expertise if they choose to enter a faculty role.

Nurse educators can choose to teach in a specialized field of their choosing. There is not extra degree needed to be earned other than a Master's degree in nursing. Most schools will only hire a nurse to teach a class if they have had experience in that area. This is so the students can have a better understanding of the subject.

See also

References

  1. ^ NCSBN website

External links

  • NurseSource.org
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