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Monaco–European Union relations

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Monaco–European Union relations

Euro-Monegasque relations
Map indicating locations of European Union and Monaco

European Union

Monaco

Relations between Monaco and the European Union (EU) are primarily conducted through France. Through that relationship Monaco directly participates in certain EU policies. Monaco is an integral part of the EU customs territory & VAT area and applies most measures on VAT and Excise duties (particularly relating to free movement in the EU.[1]

However this relationship does not extend to external trade. Preferential trade agreements between the EU and third countries apply only to goods originating from the customs territory - Monaco may not claim EU origin in this respect.[1]

Monaco is a de facto member of the Schengen area (its borders and customs territory are treated as part of France) and it officially uses the euro as its sole currency. It uses the euro via an agreement with the EU and France and is allowed by the EU to mint its own coins. Monaco uses the euro as it previously had its currency tied 1:1 with the French franc.[1]

The two have also concluded agreements on the application of Community legislation to pharmaceuticals, cosmetic products and medical devices (this entered into force on 1 May 2004); and on savings taxation (in force since 1 July 2005).[1]

Future integration

In November 2012, after the Council of the European Union had called for an evaluation of the EU's relations with the sovereign European microstates of Andorra, Monaco and San Marino, which they described as "fragmented",[2] the European Commission published a report outlining options for their further integration into the EU.[3] Unlike Liechtenstein, which is a member of the European Economic Area (EEA) via the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and the Schengen Agreement, relations with these three states are based on a collection of agreements covering specific issues. The report examined four alternatives to the current situation: 1) a Sectoral Approach with separate agreements with each state covering an entire policy area, 2) a comprehensive, multilateral Framework Association Agreement (FAA) with the three states, 3) EEA membership, and 4) EU membership. The Commission argued that the sectoral approach did not address the major issues and was still needlessly complicated, while EU membership was dismissed in the near future because "the EU institutions are currently not adapted to the accession of such small-sized countries." The remaining options, EEA membership and a FAA with the states, were found to be viable and were recommended by the Commission. In response, the Council requested that negotiations with the three microstates on further integration continue, and that a report be prepared by the end of 2013 detailing the implications of the two viable alternatives and recommendations on how to proceed.[4]

As EEA membership is currently only open to EFTA or EU members, the consent of existing EFTA member states is required for the microstates to join the EEA without becoming members of the EU. In 2011, [8]

On 18 November 2013 the EU Commission published their report which concluded that "the participation of the small-sized countries in the EEA is not judged to be a viable option at present due to the political and institutional reasons", but that Association Agreements were a more feasible mechanism to integrate the microstates into the internal market, preferably via a single multilateral agreement with all three states.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d The EU's relations with Monaco, European External Action Service, September 2011
  2. ^ "Council conclusions on EU relations with EFTA countries".  
  3. ^ "Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee of the Regions - EU Relations with the Principality of Andorra, the Principality of Monaco and the Republic of San Marino - Options for Closer Integration with the EU". 2012. 
  4. ^ "Council conclusions on EU relations with the Principality of Andorra, the Republic of San Marino and the Principality of Monaco".  
  5. ^ "Norge sier nei til nye mikrostater i EØS". 2011-05-19. Retrieved 2013-04-06. 
  6. ^ "Innlegg på møte i Stortingets europautvalg".  
  7. ^ "Eide: Bedre blir det ikke". 2012-12-21. Retrieved 2013-04-01. 
  8. ^ a b Aalberg Undheim, Eva (2012-12-08). "Regjeringa open for diskutere EØS-medlemskap for mikrostatar" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2013-04-06. 
  9. ^ "La Norvegia chiude le porte a San Marino". La Tribuna Sammarinese. 2013-01-03. p. 7. Retrieved 2013-04-06. 
  10. ^ "EU Relations with the Principality of Andorra, the Principality of Monaco and the Republic of San Marino: Options for their participation in the Internal Market".  
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