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Meeting point

 

Meeting point

German standardized pictogram for a fire safety assembly point
A signed meeting point at the airport Oslo Gardermoen

A meeting point, meeting place, or assembly point is a geographically defined place where people meet. Such a meeting point is often a landmark which has become popular and is a convenient place for both tourists and citizens to meet. Examples of meeting points include public areas and facilities such as squares, statues, parks, amusement parks, railway stations, airports, etc. or officially designated and signed points in such public facilities. There is often a public sign designating an official meeting point in public facilities (see illustrations).

Especially when called an assembly point, a meeting point is a designated (safe) place where people can gather or must report to during an emergency or a fire drill etc.[1]

In sociology, a meeting point is a place where a group of people meet on a regular basis, for example a group of regulars or people with a special interest or background. These meeting points are in designated private rooms, in a part of a park, or in a café. Sites like meetways.com can help people find a meeting point between two addresses.

Examples of well-known meeting points

Australia


Denmark

Nicaragua


Sweden

  • Svampen, "the mushroom", a mushroom shaped structure on Stureplan, Stockholm.
  • Ringen på centralen, "the ring at the central station", a fenced, circle-shaped opening between two levels at the Central Station, Stockholm.

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ http://city-news.whereilive.com.au/news/story/hungry-jacks-a-hub/
  3. ^ http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/ShowUserReviews-g255100-d526963-r15626238-Flinders_Street_Station-Melbourne_Victoria.html
  4. ^ http://www.scenicadelaide.com/2008/08/30/the-rundle-mall-balls-meeting-place-for-young-and-old/
  5. ^ http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/sydneytownhall/hiring-town-hall-surrounds.asp
  6. ^ http://www.hovedbanen.dk/
  7. ^ http://www.opwr.org/


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