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Marcelo dos Santos Cipriano

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Marcelo dos Santos Cipriano

Marcelo
Personal information
Full nameMarcelo dos Santos Cipriano
Date of birth (1969-10-11) 11 October 1969 (age 44)
Place of birthNiterói, Brazil
Height1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing positionStriker
Youth career
Académica
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1988–1991Académica35(5)
1989–1990Sertanense (loan)
1991–1992Feirense31(12)
1992–1993Gil Vicente22(3)
1993–1995Tirsense65(26)
1995–1996Benfica27(7)
1996–1997Alavés23(0)
1997–1999Sheffield United65(25)
1999–2002Birmingham City77(24)
2002Walsall9(1)
2002–2004Académica30(5)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Marcelo dos Santos Cipriano (born 11 October 1969), simply known as Marcelo, is a Brazilian-born Portuguese retired footballer who played as a striker.

He played professionally in Portugal (most notably one season for Benfica), England (appearing for three Football League Championship clubs) and Spain.

Football career

Académica / Benfica

Born in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro to Portuguese parents,[1] Marcelo returned to their homeland still in his teens, entering the youth system of Associação Académica de Coimbra, which loaned him to fourth division team Sertanense F.C. in the 1989 summer.

After one season apiece with Académica and C.D. Feirense in the second level, Marcelo made his top flight debuts with Gil Vicente FC, scoring three goals for the Barcelos-based outfit. His most successful period in his adopted nation would be lived at lowly F.C. Tirsense, which he helped achieve first division promotion in 1994, subsequently netting 17 times in 1994–95 as the northern side achieved a best-ever eight-place in the competition.

Marcelo's exploits earned him a transfer to national giants S.L. Benfica, finishing his sole season as the Reds' topscorer in the league behind João Vieira Pinto, but the club did not win any silverware. Subsequently, he played one year in the Spanish second division with Deportivo Alavés, going scoreless in nearly 25 league appearances.

England / Later years

In the following five years, Marcelo played in England, starting in 1997 with Sheffield United, which signed the player for a fee of £400,000.[1] In the FA Cup tournament during his first year, he helped take the team to the semifinals, after scoring against Coventry City at Highfield Road to set up the (eventually victorious) replay.

Birmingham City acquired Marcelo's services in 1999 for a fee of £500,000.[2] He played on the losing side in the 2001 Football League Cup Final, coming on as a second-half substitute and netting in the penalty shootout.[3] He ended his career in the country at Walsall,[4] for whom he played nine times and scored once, against Burnley.[5]

At nearly 33, Marcelo returned to Portugal and first professional team Académica, amassing a further 30 top division matches in two seasons, after which he retired from the game.

References

External links

  • Stats and profile at Zerozero
  • Stats at ForaDeJogo
  • BDFutbol profile
  • Soccerbase

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