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List of weapons of the U.S. Marine Corps

This is a list of weapons used by the United States Marine Corps:

Weapons used

The basic infantry weapon of the United States Marine Corps is the M16 assault rifle family, with a majority of Marines being equipped with the M16A4 service rifle, or more recently the M4 carbine—a compact variant. Suppressive fire is provided by the M249 SAW, which is being replaced by the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle, and the M240G machine gun, at the squad and company levels respectively. In addition, indirect fire is provided by the M203 grenade launcher in fireteams, M224 60 mm mortar in companies, and M252 81 mm mortar in battalions. The M2 .50 caliber heavy machine gun and MK19 automatic grenade launcher (40 mm) are available for use by dismounted infantry, though they are more commonly vehicle-mounted. Precision fire is provided by the M39 Enhanced Marksman Rifle, which is being replaced by the M110 Semi-Automatic Sniper System and M40A3 and A5 sniper rifle bolt action sniper rifle.[1]

The Marine Corps uses a variety of direct-fire rockets and missiles to provide infantry with an offensive and defensive anti-armor capability. The SMAW and AT4 are unguided rockets that can destroy armor and fixed defenses (e.g. bunkers) at ranges up to 500 meters. The Predator SRAW, FGM-148 Javelin and BGM-71 TOW are anti-tank guided missiles; all three can utilize top-attack profiles to avoid heavy frontal armor. The Predator is a short-range fire-and-forget weapon; the Javelin and TOW are heavier missiles effective past 2,000 meters that give infantry an offensive capability against armor.[2]

Marines are capable of deploying non-lethal weaponry as the situation dictates. Part of a Marine Expeditionary Unit earning the Special Operations Capable designator requires a company-sized unit capable of riot control.

Some older weapons are used for ceremonial purposes, such as the Silent Drill Platoon's M1 Garands, or the use of the M101 howitzer for gun salutes.

Active use

Non-lethal

Bladed weapons

[3]

Pistol

Assault Rifles & Carbines

  • M16 rifle - M16A4 variant in use
  • M4 carbine - Carbine-length variant of the M16A4 with collapsible stock.
  • M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle - Support weapon based on the HK 416 (itself a piston-driven M4) using a free-floating heavy barrel, being issued as a replacement for the M249.

Designated Marksman Rifles

Sniper Rifles

  • Mk 11 Mod 0 - 7.62x51mm marksmen rifle based on the M16 direct impingement gas system.
  • M40 rifle - M40A3 and M40A5 variants in use as sniper rifles.
  • Barrett M82 - in use as the M82A3 and M107 variants. The M82A3 being an upgraded M82A1A, and the M107 being a variant made in response to requirements issued for an anti-materiel rifle.

Submachine gun

  • Colt 9mm SMG - variant of the M16 chambered in 9x19mm Parabellum[6]
  • MP5 - variants in limited service

Shotguns

Machine Guns

  • M2HB - heavy machine gun chambered in .50 BMG used primarily as a secondary weapon on the M1 Abrams and other vehicles.
  • M240G - 7.62x51mm medium machine gun used primarily on lighter vehicles and helicopters.
  • M249 - 5.56x45mm light machine gun, being phased out in favor of the M27 IAR.

Hand Grenades

Grenade Launchers

Mortars

Artillery

Missile Launchers


Vehicle-Mounted

Aircraft-Mounted


Guns
Bombs
Missiles

Other


Accessories

Testing/Limited Use


Marines with MARSOC, Force Reconnaissance, and MEU(SOC)s occasionally use specialized weapons that the rest of the fleet does not. In addition, some weapons are tested and evaluated in select units before acceptance and large-scale adoption. In a few cases, older weapons are brought out of retirement for limited use.

Retired

Bladed weapons
Pistols
Rifles, Carbines, & Muskets


Submachine guns
Machine guns
Explosives & Launchers


Aircraft/vehicle-mounted
Other

See also


References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.
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