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List of governments by development aid

This is a list of governments giving development aid based on official development assistance (ODA) provided to developing countries.

Most ODA comes from the 28 members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), or about $135 billion in 2013, with an additional $15.9 billion from the European Commission and a further $9.4 billion from seven non-DAC countries, which reported preliminary figures in 2013.[1]

Contents

  • Official development assistance by country in absolute terms in 2013 1
  • Official development assistance by country as a percentage of Gross National Income in 2013 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Official development assistance by country in absolute terms in 2013

To qualify as official development assistance, a contribution must contain three elements:

  1. Be undertaken by the official sector (that is, a government or government agency);
  2. With promotion of economic development and welfare as the main objective;
  3. At concessional financial terms (that is, with favorable loan terms.)

Thus, by definition, ODA does not include private donations.

According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the DAC countries giving the highest amounts of ODA (in absolute terms) are as follows. European Union countries together gave $70.73 billion and EU Institutions gave a further $15.93 billion.[1][2][3]

  1.  United States – $31.55 billion
  2.  United Kingdom – $17.88 billion
  3.  Germany – $14.06 billion
  4.  Japan – $11.79 billion
  5.  France – $11.38 billion
  6.  Sweden – $5.83 billion
  7.  Norway – $5.58 billion
  8.  Netherlands – $5.44 billion
  9.  Canada – $4.91 billion
  10.  Australia – $4.85 billion
  11.  Italy – $3.25 billion
  12.   Switzerland – $3.20 billion
  13.  Denmark – $2.93 billion
  14.  Belgium – $2.28 billion
  15.  Spain – $2.20 billion
  16.  South Korea – $1.74 billion
  17.  Finland – $1.44 billion
  18.  Austria – $1.17 billion
  19.  Ireland – $0.82 billion
  20.  Portugal – $0.48 billion
  21.  Poland – $0.47 billion
  22.  New Zealand – $0.46 billion
  23.  Luxembourg – $0.43 billion
  24.  Greece – $0.31 billion
  25.  Czech Republic – $0.21 billion
  26.  Slovak Republic – $0.09 billion
  27.  Slovenia – $0.06 billion
  28.  Iceland – $0.04 billion

Non-DAC countries reported preliminary ODA figures as follows:

India, which does not submit figures to the DAC, had a foreign aid budget of $1.6 billion in 2015-6.[4]

Official development assistance by country as a percentage of Gross National Income in 2013

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development also lists countries by the amount of ODA they give as a percentage of their gross national income. Five countries met the longstanding UN target for an ODA/GNI ratio of 0.7% in 2013:[1][2]

  1.  Norway – 1.07%
  2.  Sweden – 1.02%
  3.  Luxembourg – 1.00%
  4.  Denmark – 0.85%
  5.  United Kingdom – 0.72%
  6.  Netherlands – 0.67%
  7.  Finland – 0.55%
  8.   Switzerland – 0.47%
  9.  Belgium – 0.45%
  10.  Ireland – 0.45%
  11.  France – 0.41%
  12.  Germany – 0.38%
  13.  Australia – 0.34%
  14.  Austria – 0.28%
  15.  Canada – 0.27%
  16.  New Zealand – 0.26%
  17.  Iceland – 0.26%
  18.  Japan – 0.23%
  19.  Portugal – 0.23%
  20.  United States – 0.19%
  21.  Spain – 0.16%
  22.  Italy – 0.16%
  23.  South Korea – 0.13%
  24.  Slovenia – 0.13%
  25.  Greece – 0.13%
  26.  Czech Republic – 0.11%
  27.  Poland – 0.10%
  28.  Slovak Republic – 0.09%

European Union countries that are members of the Development Assistance Committee gave 0.42% of GNI (excluding the $15.93 billion given by EU Institutions).[1]

Non-DAC countries reported preliminary ODA figures as a percentage of GNI as follows:

The UAE's ODA/GNI ratio rose to 1.25% in 2013, the largest reported share of any country, due to their contributions to address financial and infrastructure needs in Egypt,[1] Jordan, Palestine, Afghanistan and Syria. The UAE puts this figure at 1.33% of GNI and a total of $5.9 in aid contributions for 2013.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^
  4. ^ https://www.devex.com/news/india-s-2015-16-foreign-aid-budget-where-the-money-is-going-85666
  5. ^
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