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Liberian cuisine

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Title: Liberian cuisine  
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Liberian cuisine

A beachside barbeque at Sinkor, Monrovia, Liberia.

Liberian cuisine is centered on the consumption of rice, tropical fruits, vegetables, fish and fufu.

Diet

Rice is a staple of the Liberia diet. Other ingredients include cassava, fish, bananas, citrus fruit, plantains, coconut, okra and sweet potatoes.[1] Heavy stews spiced with habanero and scotch bonnet chillies are popular and eaten with fufu.[2]

Liberian cuisine has been influenced by contact, trade and colonization from the United States, especially foods from the American South (Southern food). Liberia also has a tradition of baking imported from the United States that is unique in West Africa.[3]

Bushmeat

Bushmeat is widely eaten in Liberia, and is considered a delicacy.[4] A 2004 public opinion survey found that bushmeat ranked second behind fish amongst Monrovians as a preferred source of protein.[4] Of households where bushmeat was served, 80% of residents said they cooked it “once in a while,” while 13% cooked it once a week and 7% cooked bushmeat daily.[4] The survey was conducted during the last civil war, and bushmeat consumption is now believed to be far higher.[4]

Endangered species are hunted for human consumption in Liberia.[5] Species hunted for food in Liberia include elephants, pygmy hippopotamus, chimpanzees, leopards, duikers, and various types of monkeys.[5]

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b c d "Extinction is forever: A crisis that is Liberia's endangered wildlife", Wynfred Russell, Front Page Africa, 15 January 2014.
  5. ^ a b "Poaching in Liberia's Forests Threatens Rare Animals", Anne Look, Voice of America News, May 08, 2012.
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