World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Kabardins

Not to be confused with Kabar.
Kabarday
Къэбэртайхэр
A Kabardin family in the early 1900s.
Total population
1,628,500[1]
Regions with significant populations
 Turkey 1,035,000
 Russia 590,010
498,702
56,466[2]
 Jordan 102,000
 Syria 43,000
 Saudi Arabia 23,000
 United States 3,600
 Germany 2,100
 Uzbekistan 1,300
 Ukraine 473[3]
Languages
Kabardian, Russian, Turkish, Arabic
Religion
Predominantly Sunni Islam
with minorities professing Orthodox Christianity,[4] Habze and Catholicism
Related ethnic groups
Abaza, Abkhaz, Adyghe, Ubykh.

Kabarda or Kabard (Adyghe: Къэбэртайхэр-адыгэ or Qăbărtajxăr-adǝgă; Arabic: القبرطاي أو القبردي‎); are terms referring to a people of the northern Caucasus more commonly known by the plural term Kabardin (or Kebertei as they term themselves). Originally they (with the Besleney (Arabic: البسلني‎) tribe comprised the semi-nomadic eastern branch of what was once the Adyghe tribal fellowship. The Kabardin still consider themselves as a tribe of Adyghe. They speak Kabardian, a North West Caucasian language that represents the easternmost extension of the Circassian language group.

There is an approach among the Adyghe in Circassia from different tribes to use only the Name Circassians (Adyghe) in Census 2010 in Russia; to reflect and revive the unity of the Adyghe Nation (Adyghes in Republic of Adyghea, Kabardians in Kabardino-Balkaria, Cherkess (Adyghe: Шэрджэс or Šărdžăs) in Karachay–Cherkessia, and the Shapsugs in the southern part of Krasnodar Krai, plus small Adyghe groups in Stavropol Krai and North Ossetia. This approach is widely supported in the Caucasus and among the Circassians in Diaspora.

They number around 520,000 in Russia[5] (as of 2002), living mainly in Kabardino-Balkaria. Significant populations of Kabardin are found in Turkey and Georgia.[1] There are also communities in the USA, Jordan and Syria. Kabard villages in Turkey are concentrated on Uzunyayla plateau of Kayseri Province.

Most Kabardin are Sunni Muslims. However, Kabardin speakers living in Mozdoksky District in the Republic of North Ossetia–Alania are Orthodox Christians.[4][6] Nearly 2% of the Catholics in Russia, or about 2,500-3,000, are Kabardin; there is also a similarly-sized Jewish community.[7]

Some of the Kabardians living in North Ossetian Republic's Mozdok district and the southern part of the neighbouring Kursky district of Stavropol Krai are Orthodox Christians, whereas the other part of which are Sunni Muslims as well as Kabardians of Kabardino-Balkar Republic who belong mainly to Sunni Muslim faith, with a Habze minority.

References

External links

Template:Sister-inline

Template:Circassian diaspora

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.