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Joseph Enakarhire

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Joseph Enakarhire

Joseph Enakarhire
Personal information
Full name Joseph Enakarhire
Date of birth (1982-11-06) 6 November 1982
Place of birth Warri, Nigeria
Height 1.84 m (6 ft 12 in)
Playing position Defender
Club information
Current team
Free agent
Youth career
1998–1999 Rangers International
1999–2001 Standard Liège
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2001–2004 Standard Liège 75 (1)
2004–2005 Sporting CP 19 (0)
2005–2008 Dynamo Moscow 9 (1)
2006–2007 Bordeaux (loan) 16 (0)
2007–2008 Panathinaikos (loan) 2 (0)
2012 La Fiorita 0 (0)
2013 Daugava 2 (0)
National team
2002–2006 Nigeria 22 (2)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 20 August 2013.

† Appearances (goals)

Joseph Enakarhire (born 6 November 1982) is a Nigerian professional footballer. He can operate as either a right back or a central defender.

Contents

  • Club career 1
  • International career 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Club career

Born in Warri, Enakarhire impressed at a young age at Standard Liège before moving to Sporting Clube de Portugal in 2004–05, signing a four-year contract[1] and eventually becoming first-choice. However, after just one season, he was sold to Russia's big spenders FC Dynamo Moscow.[2]

Unsettled, Enakarhire was loaned, in August 2006, to Ligue 1 side FC Girondins de Bordeaux, as another former Sporting defender, Beto, left for Recreativo de Huelva also on loan.[3] He was relatively used during the campaign and, after the French decided against signing him permanently, he joined Greece's Panathinaikos FC on a season-long loan.[4]

In July 2009, Enakarhire had an unsuccessful trial with FC Metz.[5] In the following year, he met the same fate at Odense Boldklub and FC Energie Cottbus.[6]

In late June 2012, after four years out of football, Enakarhire was signed by S.P. La Fiorita to boost the Sammarinese club's first campaign in the UEFA Europa League.[7] In March of the following year he changed teams and countries again, joining Latvian Higher League champions FC Daugava[8] but being released after only four months.

International career

A Nigerian international since 2003, Enakarhire appeared with the Super Eagles at the 2004 and 2006 Africa Cup of Nations. He was an undisputed starter in the latter tournament as Nigeria finished third, only conceding three goals. The Nigerian defender was known for his physical strength and a key player to Nigeria's defence.

References

  1. ^ Enakarhire bolsters Sporting; UEFA.com, 3 August 2004
  2. ^ Enakarhire hired by Dynamo; UEFA.com, 18 July 2005
  3. ^ Enakarhire makes way to Bordeaux; UEFA.com, 31 August 2006
  4. ^ Энакархире стал игроком "Панатинаикоса" [Enakarhire became a Panathinaikos player] (in Russian). Sport Express. 31 July 2007. Retrieved 20 September 2009. 
  5. ^ "Bong proche du VAFC" [Bong near VAFC] (in French). FC Metz. Archived from the original on 21 September 2009. 
  6. ^ "Joseph Enakarhire lost Energie Cottbus deal to politics". All Nigeria Soccer. 11 September 2010. Retrieved 18 November 2010. 
  7. ^ "Mancano solo i dettagli burocratici, Joseph Enakarhire sarà il rinforzo per l’Europa League" [Bureaucratic details notwithstanding, Joseph Enakarhire will be reinforcement for the Europa League] (in Italian).  
  8. ^ "Apskats: Sešus miljonus vērts aizsargs un patriotiskā Liepāja (2.daļa)" (in Latvian). Sporta Centrs. 29 March 2013. Retrieved 6 May 2013. 

External links

  • L'Équipe stats (French)
  • Joseph Enakarhire profile at ForaDeJogo
  • Joseph Enakarhire at National-Football-Teams.com
  • Joseph Enakarhire profile at Soccerway
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