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Islamic extremism

 

Islamic extremism

Islamic extremism refers to two related and partially overlapping but also distinct aspects of extreme interpretations and pursuits of Islamic ideology:

  • An extremely conservative view of Islam,[1] which does not necessarily entail violence.[2] (see also Islamic fundamentalism; Zeyno Baran, Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Eurasian Policy at the Hudson Institute, prefers the term Islamism[3])
  • The use of violent tactics such as bombing and assassinations for achieving perceived Islamic goals;[4] see Jihadism. (Zeyno Baran prefers the term Islamist extremism.[3])

Contents

  • History 1
  • Islamism 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

History

Extremism within Islam goes back to the 7th century to the Kharijites. From their essentially political position, they developed extreme doctrines that further set them apart from both mainstream Sunni and Shiʿa Muslims. The Kharijites were particularly noted for adopting a radical approach to Takfir, whereby they declared other Muslims to be unbelievers and therefore deemed them worthy of death.[5][6][7]

Islamism

Zeyno Baran, Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Eurasian Policy at the Hudson Institute, argues Islamist extremism and Islamism are better terms, to distinguish the political ideology from the religion.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Brian R. Farmer (2007). Understanding radical Islam: medieval ideology in the twenty-first century. Peter Lang. p. 36.  
  2. ^ Jason F. Isaacson; Colin Lewis Rubenstein (2002). Islam in Asia: changing political realities. Transaction Publishers. p. 191.  
  3. ^ a b c Baran, Zeyno (2008-07-10). "The Roots of Violent Islamist Extremism and Efforts to Counter It" (PDF). Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. Retrieved 2011-11-11. 
  4. ^ Ira Marvin Lapidus (2002). A history of Islamic societies. Cambridge University Press. p. 823.  
  5. ^ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/another-battle-with-islams-true-believers/article20802390/
  6. ^ http://www.quilliamfoundation.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/publications/free/the-balance-of-islam-in-challenging-extremism.pdf
  7. ^ http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/fruits-of-the-tree-of-extremism


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