World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Hokuriku region

Article Id: WHEBN0000366757
Reproduction Date:

Title: Hokuriku region  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Toyama Prefecture, Kōshin'etsu region, Hokuriku dialect, Japan National Route 8, Fukui Prefecture
Collection: Chūbu Region, Hokuriku Region
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Hokuriku region

Hokuriku region

The Hokuriku region (北陸地方 Hokuriku chihō, Lit. "Northlands region") is located in the northwestern part of Honshu, the main island of Japan. It lies along the Sea of Japan within the Chūbu region.[1] It is almost equivalent to Koshi Province and Hokurikudō area in pre-modern Japan.

The Hokuriku region includes the four prefectures of Ishikawa, Fukui, Niigata and Toyama,[2] although Niigata is sometimes included in one of the following regions:

Contents

  • Major cities 1
  • Industries 2
  • Climate 3
  • Tourism 4
  • See also 5
  • Notes 6
  • References 7

Major cities

The major population centers of Hokuriku are:

Of these, Niigata is the largest with a population of over 800,000.

Industries

The main industries in the Hokuriku area include chemicals, medicine, tourism, textiles and textile machinery, heavy machinery, farming, and fishing. Koshihikari, a popular variety of rice is a special product of Hokuriku region.

Climate

The Hokuriku region has the highest volume of snowfall of any inhabited and arable region in the world. This is because dry Siberian air masses, which develop high humidity over the Sea of Japan, are forced upwards when they encounter the mountains of Honshū, causing the humidity to condense as snow.

The long winters and deep snow of this region are depicted in Hokuetsu Seppu, an encyclopedic work of the late Edo period which describes life in the Uonuma district of Niigata Prefecture.

The Hokuriku region is also the setting for Yasunari Kawabata's novel Snow Country.

Tourism

Hokuriku is listed as #4 in Lonely Planet's Best in Travel 2014 - Top 10 Regions. http://www.lonelyplanet.com/travel-tips-and-articles/lonely-planets-best-in-travel-2014-top-10-regions

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Chūbu" in , p. 126Japan Encyclopedia, p. 126, at Google Books.
  2. ^ Nussbaum, "Hokuriku" at p. 344, p. 344, at Google Books.

References

  • Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric and Käthe Roth (2005). Japan Encyclopedia. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. OCLC 58053128. ISBN 0-674-01753-6, ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.