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Heart and Souls

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Title: Heart and Souls  
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Subject: Ron Underwood, Robert Downey, Jr., Jean-Pierre Dorleac, Tom Sizemore, Elisabeth Shue
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Heart and Souls

Heart and Souls
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Ron Underwood
Produced by Nancy Roberts
Sean Daniel[1]
Written by Brent Maddock
S. S. Wilson
Gregory Hansen
Erik Hansen[1]
Starring Robert Downey, Jr.
Charles Grodin
Alfre Woodard
Kyra Sedgwick
Elisabeth Shue
Tom Sizemore
David Paymer
Music by Marc Shaiman
Cinematography Michael W. Watkins
Edited by O. Nicholas Brown[1]
Production
company
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
  • August 13, 1993 (1993-08-13)
Running time 104 minutes[2]
Country United States
Language English
Box office $16,581,714

Heart and Souls is a 1993 American fantasy comedy film directed by Ron Underwood and starring Robert Downey Jr. as Thomas Riley, a businessman recruited by the souls of four deceased people - his guardian angels from childhood - to help them rectify their unfinished lives, as he is the only one who can communicate with them.

Contents

  • Plot 1
  • Cast 2
  • Production 3
  • Reception 4
  • Accolades 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Plot

In San Francisco, 1959, single mother Penny Washington leaves her three children at home to work in her night shift as a telephone operator. Shy singer Harrison Winslow is afraid of the stage and quits his audition. Country girl waitress Julia regrets turning down her boyfriend John's marriage proposal and leaves her job to seek him out. Small-time thief Milo Peck attempts to retrieve a collection of vintage stamps that he had stolen from a young boy. They all embark on the same bus, but the driver, Hal, becomes distracted and has a serious accident, killing himself and everyone on-board.

Meanwhile, Frank Reilly is driving his pregnant wife Eva to the hospital. Frank successfully swerves to escape the bus, just before it falls off an overpass, but Eva delivers their baby in the car. The souls of the four passengers become the guardian angels of the boy, Thomas Reilly, and can been seen only by him. However, seven years later, the boy's parents and teachers begin to worry about his obsession with his "imaginary friends". After realising their presence is harming Thomas, the quartet decide to become invisible also to him.

Thirty-four years later, in 1993, Hal returns with his bus and prepares to take them to the next life. The quartet learns from Hal that they had all those years with Thomas to resolve the problems they left behind, as he is their corporeal form. After convincing Hal to buy some more time for them to rectify their unfinished lives, they return to Thomas, who is now a tough businessman and indecisive in his relationship with girlfriend Anne, and ask him for his help.

Thomas reluctantly agrees and, through a series of hilarious mishaps, the lost souls are freed: Milo by returning the stolen stamps; Harrison by facing his fears and singing to a live audience; Penny by discovering the fates of her children; Julia by encouraging Thomas to repair his relationship with Anne, as she was never able to do the same with John. In the end, Thomas becomes a better man and he dances with Anne as four stars twinkle in the night sky, symbolizing that Penny, Julia, Harrison and Milo are finally at peace.

Cast

Production

The film was shot on-location in San Francisco, California.[1]

Reception

Heart and Souls received mixed reviews from critics, as it currently holds a 55% rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 22 reviews.[3]

Accolades

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Janet Maslin (13 August 1993). "Heart and Souls (1993) Reviews/Film; A Yuppie Haunted (Really) By Other People's Problems".  
  2. ^ (PG)"HEART AND SOULS".  
  3. ^ "Heart and Souls".  

External links

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