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Hamidieh soldier

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Hamidieh soldier

For the Ottoman warship, see Ottoman cruiser Hamidiye.
Hamidiye

A major in the Hamidiye
Active 1890-1908
Country Ottoman Empire
Branch Ottoman Army
Type Cavalry
Size 16,500+ in 1892.[1]
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Zeki Pasha

The Hamidiye corps (literally meaning "belonging to Hamid",[2] full official name Hamidiye Hafif Süvari alayları, Hamidiye Light Cavalry Regiments) were well-armed, irregular Sunni Kurdish, Turkish,[3][4] Turkmen[5] and Yörük,[6][7] also Arab cavalry formations that operated in the eastern provinces of the Ottoman Empire. Established by and named after Sultan Abdul Hamid II in 1890, they were intended to be modeled after the Russian Cossacks and were supposedly tasked to patrol the Russo-Ottoman frontier. However, the Hamidiye were more often used by the Ottoman authorities to harass and assault Armenians living in Western Armenia.[8]

A major role in the Armenian massacres of 1894-96 has been often ascribed to the Hamidiye regiments, particularly during the bloody suppression of the revolt of the Armenians of Sasun (1894), but recent research has shown that the Hamidiye played a less important role than previously assumed.[9]

Units

The Hamidiye Regiments were stationed in the following towns and villages.[10]

Number Tribe Place Cavalry Infantry Total
1 Sipkân Dutak 400 250 650
2 Sipkân Hosuna 400 175 575
3 Sipkân Cemal Verdi 400 225 625
4 Zilan Toprakkale 250 360 610
5 Zilan Karakilise 450 250 700
6 Karapapak and Kurds Eleşkirt and Karakilise 400 150 650
7 Terekeme and Kurds Tulak - Karakilise 300 200 500
8 Keşvan Hasankale 200 175 475
9 Şapikan and Badayan Kızıldiz 250 325 575
10 Taşkesen, Diyadin Kasatkanlı 198 350 548
11 Mikaili Karakilise, Diyadin 175 325 500
12 Hamdiki, Başımi, Hal Hesini Karakilise, Diyadin 225 350 525
13 Haydaran Bergiri (Muradiye) 200 318 518
14 Haydaran Bergiri (Muradiye) 175 350 525
15 Şevli Van, Timar 200 350 550
16 Kalıkan, Livi Erciş 255 270 525
17 Mukuri Saray 215 315 530
18 Takari Zermaniz, Saray 300 380 680
19 Milli, Şemsiki Saray 225 425 650
20 Şkeftka Eblak 327 213 540
21 Adaman, Zilan, Hecidıran Erciş 250 275 525
22 Haydaran Erciş 175 350 525
23 Haydaran Adilcevaz 200 350 550
24 Heydaran Erciş 175 350 525
25 Marhoran Adilcevaz 250 300 550
26 Hasenan Hınıs (Kumdeban) 335 205 540
27 Hasenan Malazgirt 340 200 540
28 Hasenan Malazgirt (Diknuk, Dinbut) 304 230 534
29 Hasenan Moranköyü 310 230 540
30 Hasenan Bulanık 308 232 540
31 Cibran Gümgüm 308 232 540
32 Cibran Hınıs 310 235 545
33 Cibran Varto 315 330 545
34 Zirkan Tekman 300 250 550
35 Zirkan Söylemez 375 500 875
36 Cibran Kiğı 285 265 550
37 Celali Bayezit (Örtülü kışlağı) 305 370 540
38 Celali Bayezit (Şeyhlu kışlağı) 300 240 540
39 Takori Mahmudiye (Saray) 305 301 606
40 Kafkasya muhacirleri Sivas 275 500 775
41 Milli Mardin 275 265 540
42 Milli Siverek 255 375 630
43 Milli Siverek 303 247 550
44 Karakeçi Siverek 305 225 530
45 Kikan Ra's al-'Ayn, Mardin 350 270 620
46 Tay (Arab) Nusaybin 445 185 630
47 Karakeçi Siverek 310 230 540
48 Miran Cezire 335 205 540
49 Miran Cezire 308 232 540
50 Ertoşi Elbak 375 300 625
51 Kays Urfa 450 200 650
52 Kays Harran 400 150 550
53 Berazı Urfa 250 300 550
54 Berazı Urfa 300 300 600
55 Berazı Urfa 275 300 575
56 Gevdan Hakkari 200 300 500
57 Şadili Hasankale 300 250 550
58 Adaman Erciş 200 350 550
59 Pinyan Hakkari 150 400 550
60 Şidan Hakkari 350 300 650
61 Kasıkan Söylemez 250 300 550
62 Kiki Harran 250 350 600
63 Milli Viranşehir 550 250 800
64 Milli Viranşehir 600 225 825
65 Belideyi Erciş, Patnos, Malazgirt 250 200 450

References

Further reading

  • Klein, Janet. The Margins of Empire: Kurdish Militias in the Ottoman Tribal Zone. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2011.
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