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Greg Hicks

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Greg Hicks

Greg Hicks
Born (1953-05-27) 27 May 1953
Leicester, England, U.K.
Occupation Actor

Greg Hicks (born 27 May 1953) is an English actor. He completed theatrical training at Rose Bruford College[1] and has been a member of The Royal Shakespeare Company since 1976. He was nominated for a 2004 Laurence Olivier Theatre Award[2] in the category "Best Actor of 2003" for his performance in Coriolanus at the Old Vic and was awarded the 2003 Critics' Circle Theatre Awards (Drama) for Best Shakespearian Performance in the same role.[3]

Hicks has practised the Brazilian hybrid of martial arts and dance capoeira,[4] as well as the Japanese dance-theatre form butoh.[5] He has said that he started to explore the physicality associated with these disciplines in a masked production of Oresteia (1981), directed by his mentor at the National Theatre, Peter Hall.[6]

Contents

  • Selected stage performances 1
  • Partial filmography 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Selected stage performances

Partial filmography

References

  1. ^ http://www.whatsonstage.com/interviews/theatre/london/E8821070553137/20+Questions+With...Greg+Hicks.html
  2. ^ http://www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk/olivier_awards/past_winners/view/item98547/Olivier-Winners-2004/
  3. ^ http://criticscircle.org.uk/drama/award.asp?CAT=drama_sp&title=The%20John%20And%20Wendy%20Trewin%20Award%20For%20Best%20Shakespearian%20Performance
  4. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/2005/oct/10/rsc.theatre
  5. ^ http://www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk/news/interviews/view/item71748/Greg-Hicks/
  6. ^ Hicks, Greg (16 September 2014). "Greg Hicks: how Peter Hall transformed me as an actor". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 September 2015. 

External links

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