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FIFPro World XI

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FIFPro World XI

FIFPro
FIFPro
FIFPro logo
Formation 1965
Location Hoofddorp, Netherlands
Region served Worldwide
Membership 55 members
Official languages English, French, Spanish
President Phillipe Piat
Website http://www.fifpro.org

The Fédération Internationale des Associations de Footballeurs Professionnels (English - International Federation of Professional Footballers), generally referred to as FIFPro, is the worldwide representative organisation for 65,000 professional football players. FIFPro, with its global headquarters in Hoofddorp, The Netherlands, is presently made up of 55 national players' associations. In addition, there are three candidate members and seven observers.

Brief history

On 15 December 1965 representatives of the French, Scottish, English, Italian and Dutch players' associations met in Paris, with the objective of setting up an international federation for footballers.

In the second half of June 1966 the first FIFPro congress took place in London, just before the start of the World Championship. The articles of association of FIFPro were thereby adopted and the objectives accurately laid down. FIFPro was responsible for increasing the solidarity between professional football players and players' associations. FIFPro tried to offer the players' associations or other interest associations the means for mutual consultation and co-operation to achieve their objectives. In addition, it wished to co-ordinate the activities of the different affiliated groups in order to promote the interests of all professional football players. Indeed, FIFPro likewise had in mind propagating and defending the rights of professional football players. The emphasis was thereby laid on the freedom of the football player to be able to choose the club of his choice at the end of his contract. It was likewise laid down that FIFPro would be helpful in every required area for setting up interest associations. These are objectives which still apply to this day.

It was originally laid down that a congress would be held once every four years at a minimum - prior to the World Championship. The congress had to uphold the course set out and with a two-third majority vote. The congress is still the most important organ of FIFPro to this very day.

It soon appeared that it was necessary to organize a congress annually, and not to limit this to once every four years. Many congresses have been held in the meantime, such as for example in 1978 in Madrid and in 1979 in Athens and Venice. In the eighties and nineties many memorable congresses have been organized in almost all the large European cities, such as Paris, Athens, Milan, Manchester, Zurich, Ghent, Lisbon, Edinburgh, Copenhagen, Tel Aviv, Rome, Johannesburg, Barcelona, Santiago and Budapest. The latest congress was in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in November 2010.

The objectives of FIFPro also mean that not only FIFA applied as a talking partner. UEFA in particular, but also the European parliament and the European Commission appeared to be important points of approach. The national federations also started to become increasingly aware that, in addition to the national players' association, the international trade union FIFPro also played its role.

In recent years FIFPro has grown from a European organization into a global network. The FIFPro has done much to support countries on other continents - Asia/Oceania, Africa and South America – in their efforts to set up players’ associations. In October 2012, FIFPro welcomed the footballers’ associations of Croatia, Czech Republic, Montenegro and Ukraine as its newest members.

The Board

Current: FIFPro Board

President: Phillipe Piat (UNFP, France)

General-Secretary: Theo van Seggelen (Netherlands)

Vice Presidents: Rinaldo Martorelli (Fenapaf/Sapesp, Brazil), Brendan Schwab (PFA, Australia), Luis Rubiales (AFE, Spain)

Board members Bobby Barnes (PAA, England), Louis Everard (VVCS, Netherlands), Rinaldo Martorelli (Fenapaf/Sapesp, Brazil), David Mayébi, (AFC, Cameroon), Mads Øland, (Spillerforeningen, Denmark), Fernando Revilla (SAFAP, Peru), Luis Rubiales (AFE, Spain), Brendan Schwab (PFA, Australia), Dejan Stefanovic (SPINS, Slovenia), Leonardo Grosso (AIC, Italy)

In 1998 for the first time in FIFPro history a board member was elected by the General Assembly.

Mission statement

FIFPro has adopted its mission and its mission statement. To create its vision for the future, FIFPro at first had to define where it stands for, who it is and what it wants to achieve. In the end it has adopted its mission and its mission statement.

These are:

Mission: FIFPro supports players

Mission statement: FIFPro is the exclusive collective international voice of the world’s professional footballers

Members

Full members

Candidate members

Observer members

FIFPro World XI

Each year FIFPro invites all professional footballers in the world to compose the best team of the year since 2005. Every player is requested to pick one goalkeeper, four defenders, three midfielders and three strikers.

In 2009 the world players' union joined hands with FIFA. The team name has changed into the FIFA FIFPro World XI. Each year the eleven players from this elite squad will receive their awards during the FIFA World Player Gala.

From 2005 until 2008, FIFPro also asked the footballers to choose the Player of the Year. From 2009 on, the election for FIFPro Player of the Year merged with the FIFA World Player of the Year and France Football’s Ballon d’Or into one election.

Player marked bold won the Ballon d'Or or FIFA Ballon d'Or in that respective year.

Season Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
2005[1] Brazil Dida (Milan) Brazil Cafu (Milan)
England John Terry (Chelsea)
Italy Alessandro Nesta (Milan)
Italy Paolo Maldini (Milan)
Brazil Ronaldinho (Barcelona)
France Zinedine Zidane (Real Madrid)
France Claude Makélélé (Chelsea)
England Frank Lampard (Chelsea)
Cameroon Samuel Eto'o (Barcelona)
Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko (Milan)
2006[2] Italy Gianluigi Buffon (Juventus) France Lilian Thuram (Juventus/Barcelona)
England John Terry (Chelsea)
Italy Fabio Cannavaro (Juventus/Real Madrid)
Italy Gianluca Zambrotta (Juventus/Barcelona)
France Zinedine Zidane (Real Madrid)
Brazil Kaká (Milan)
Italy Andrea Pirlo (Milan)
Brazil Ronaldinho (Barcelona)
Cameroon Samuel Eto'o (Barcelona)
France Thierry Henry (Arsenal)
2007[3] Italy Gianluigi Buffon (Juventus) Italy Alessandro Nesta (Milan)
Italy Fabio Cannavaro (Real Madrid)
England John Terry (Chelsea)
Spain Carles Puyol (Barcelona)
Brazil Kaká (Milan)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (Manchester United)
England Steven Gerrard (Liverpool)
Brazil Ronaldinho (Barcelona)
Ivory Coast Didier Drogba (Chelsea)
Argentina Lionel Messi (Barcelona)
2008[4] Spain Iker Casillas (Real Madrid) Spain Sergio Ramos (Real Madrid)
Spain Carles Puyol (Barcelona)
England John Terry (Chelsea)
England Rio Ferdinand (Manchester United)
Brazil Kaká (Milan)
Spain Xavi (Barcelona)
England Steven Gerrard (Liverpool)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (Manchester United)
Spain Fernando Torres (Liverpool)
Argentina
Lionel Messi (Barcelona)
2009[5] Spain Iker Casillas (Real Madrid) Brazil Dani Alves (Barcelona)
England John Terry (Chelsea)
Serbia Nemanja Vidić (Manchester United)
France Patrice Evra (Manchester United)
Spain Andrés Iniesta (Barcelona)
Spain Xavi (Barcelona)
England Steven Gerrard (Liverpool)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (Manchester United/Real Madrid)
Spain Fernando Torres (Liverpool)
Argentina Lionel Messi (Barcelona)
2010[6] Spain Iker Casillas (Real Madrid) Brazil Maicon (Internazionale)
Brazil Lúcio (Internazionale)
Spain Gerard Piqué (Barcelona)
Spain Carles Puyol (Barcelona)
Spain Andrés Iniesta (Barcelona)
Spain Xavi (Barcelona)
Netherlands Wesley Sneijder (Internazionale)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid)
Spain David Villa (Valencia/Barcelona)
Argentina Lionel Messi (Barcelona)
2011[7] Spain Iker Casillas (Real Madrid) Spain Sergio Ramos (Real Madrid)
Spain Gerard Piqué (Barcelona)
Serbia Nemanja Vidić (Manchester United)
Brazil Dani Alves (Barcelona)
Spain Andrés Iniesta (Barcelona)
Spain Xavi (Barcelona)
Spain Xabi Alonso (Real Madrid)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid)
England Wayne Rooney (Manchester United)
Argentina Lionel Messi (Barcelona)
2012[8] Spain Iker Casillas (Real Madrid) Spain Sergio Ramos (Real Madrid)
Brazil Marcelo (Real Madrid)
Spain Gerard Piqué (Barcelona)
Brazil Dani Alves (Barcelona)
Spain Xabi Alonso (Real Madrid)
Spain Andrés Iniesta (Barcelona)
Spain Xavi (Barcelona)
Argentina Lionel Messi (Barcelona)
Colombia Radamel Falcao (Atlético Madrid)
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid)

Appearance records

The players with the most appearances in the team are Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi, each having appeared six times. Next are John Terry, Iker Casillas and Xavi (five times) and Andrés Iniesta (four times). They are followed by several players with three appearances: Sergio Ramos, Gerard Piqué, Dani Alves, Carles Puyol, Ronaldinho, Steven Gerrard, and Kaká.

The team with the most player appearances is Barcelona with 32. The rest come from Real Madrid (19), Milan (10), Manchester United and Chelsea (8 each), Juventus and Liverpool (5 each), Internazionale (3) and Valencia, Atlético Madrid and Arsenal (1 each).

The country with the most player appearances is Spain with 28, followed by Brazil (14), England (11), Italy (9), Argentina, France and Portugal (6 each), Cameroon and Serbia (2 each) and Colombia, Ivory Coast, Netherlands and Ukraine (1 each).

World Player of the Year

Season Player Team
2005 Brazil Ronaldinho Spain Barcelona
2006 Brazil Ronaldinho Spain Barcelona
2007 Brazil Kaká Italy Milan
2008 Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo England Manchester United

See also

External links

  • FIFPro Official Website
  • FIFPro World XI Website
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