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Euroleague

Turkish Airlines Euroleague
Current season, competition or edition:
2015–16 Euroleague
Official logo of the Turkish Airlines Euroleague
Sport Basketball
Founded 1958
CEO Jordi Bertomeu
President Jordi Bertomeu
Motto I Feel Devotion
No. of teams 31 (preliminary stage)
24 (group stage)
Countries FIBA Europe member associations
Continent Europe
Most recent champion(s) Real Madrid
(9th title)
Most titles Real Madrid
(9 titles)
TV partner(s) List of broadcasters
Related competitions FIBA Intercontinental Cup
Level on pyramid 1st tier
Official website Euroleague.net

The Turkish Airlines Euroleague, commonly known as the Euroleague, is the highest level tier and most important professional club basketball competition in Europe, with teams from up to 18 different countries, members of FIBA Europe. For sponsorship reasons, for five seasons starting with 2010–11, it is named the Turkish Airlines Euroleague.[1] The competition is controlled by the privately held Euroleague Basketball Company, and features clubs that come from a Europe-wide consortium of leading professional basketball leagues, called ULEB. During the season, the Euroleague is broadcast on television in 199 countries and territories.[2] It can be seen by up to 245 million (800 million via satellite) households weekly in China.[3] It is also televised in the United States and Canada on NBA TV and available online through ESPN3. The Euroleague Final Four is broadcast on television in 201 countries.[4]

Contents

  • History 1
    • Names of the competition 1.1
      • Turkish Airlines name sponsorship 1.1.1
  • Format 2
    • Qualifications 2.1
    • Teams with A license 2.2
      • Teams that lost the A license 2.2.1
    • Arena standards 2.3
    • Current teams 2.4
  • Finals 3
  • Titles by club 4
  • Titles by nation 5
  • Euroleague awards 6
  • Records 7
  • Euroleague versus NBA games 8
  • Statistical leaders 9
    • All-time leaders 9.1
  • Individual performances 10
  • Media coverage 11
  • Sponsors 12
  • See also 13
  • References 14
  • External links 15

History

The Euroleague (or historically called, the European Champions' Cup) was originally established by FIBA and it operated under its umbrella from 1958 until the summer of 2000, concluding with the 1999–00 season. That was when Euroleague Basketball Company was created.

FIBA had never trademarked the "Euroleague" name, even though it had used that name for the competition since 1996. Euroleague Basketball simply appropriated the name, and since FIBA had no legal recourse to do anything about it, it was forced to find a new name for its championship series. Thus, the following 2000–2001 season started with 2 separate top European professional club basketball competitions: the FIBA SuproLeague (previously known as the FIBA Euroleague) and the brand new Euroleague 2000–01 season.

The rift in European professional club basketball initially showed no signs of letting up. Top clubs were also split between the two leagues: Panathinaikos, Maccabi Tel Aviv, CSKA Moscow and Efes Pilsen stayed with FIBA, while Olympiacos, Kinder Bologna, Real Madrid, FC Barcelona, Baskonia and Benetton Treviso joined Euroleague Basketball.

In May 2001, Europe had two continental champions, Maccabi of the FIBA SuproLeague and Kinder Bologna of the Euroleague. The leaders of both organizations realized the need to come up with a unified competition. Although only a year old, Euroleague Basketball negotiated from a position of strength and dictated proceedings. FIBA essentially had no choice but to agree to Euroleague Basketball's terms. As a result, European club competition was fully integrated under Euroleague Basketball's umbrella and teams that competed in the FIBA SuproLeague during the 2000–01 season joined it as well.

In essence, the authority in European professional basketball was divided over club-country lines. FIBA stayed in charge of national team competitions (like the FIBA EuroBasket, the FIBA World Cup, and the Summer Olympics), while Euroleague Basketball took over the European professional club competitions. From that point on, FIBA's Korać Cup and Saporta Cup competitions lasted only one more season before folding, which was when Euroleague Basketball launched the ULEB Cup, now known as the Eurocup.

Names of the competition

  • FIBA era: (1958–2001)
    • FIBA European Champions Cup: (1958–1991)
    • FIBA European League ("FIBA Euro League"): (1991–1996)
    • FIBA Euroleague: (1996–2000)
    • FIBA SuproLeague: (2000–2001)
  • Euroleague Basketball era: (2000–present)
    • Euroleague: (2000 – present)

*There were two separate competitions during the 2000–01 season. The Euroleague Basketball Company.

Turkish Airlines name sponsorship

On 26 July 2010, Turkish Airlines and Euroleague Basketball announced a €15 million strategic agreement to sponsor the top European basketball competition across the globe. According to the agreement, starting with the 2010–11 season, the top European competition will be named Turkish Airlines Euroleague Basketball. Similarly, the Euroleague Final Four will be named the Turkish Airlines Euroleague Final Four, whereby the new league title will appear in all media accordingly. This title partnership will run for five seasons, with the option of extending it to an additional five.[5][6] On 23 October 2013, Turkish Airlines and Euroleague Basketball have agreed to extend their partnership up until 2020.[7]

Format

Since the 2009–10 season, the Euroleague's first phase has been the Qualifying Rounds, which involve eight clubs bracketed into a knockout tournament consisting of two-legged matches. The four survivors of the First Qualifying Round are paired against one another for the Second Qualifying Round, with the two winners playing for the last spot in the Euroleague Regular Season. All losing clubs in the Qualifying Rounds parachute into ULEB's second-tier Eurocup.

The next phase is the Regular Season, in which 24 teams participate; from 2009–10, the participants will include 23 clubs automatically entered into the Regular Season plus the Qualifying Round winner. Each team plays two games (home-and-away) against every other team in its group. At the end of the Regular Season, the field is cut from 24 to 16. Before 2008–09, the teams were divided into three groups of eight teams each, with the top five teams in each group plus the top sixth-place finisher advancing. Now, the Regular Season involves four groups with six teams each, with the first four teams in each group advancing. Since the 2013–14 season, the eight eliminated teams in this stage are dropped to the Eurocup.

Euroleague game in Madrid in 2009.

The second phase, known as the Top 16, then begins, featuring the 16 survivors of the Regular Season, drawn into eight-team groups. As in the Regular Season, each Top 16 group is contested in a double round-robin format.

The third phase, the Quarterfinal round, has been played since the 2004–05 season. Before, only the group winners advanced to the Euroleague Final Four (see below). Now, the first- and second-place teams from each group advance. In the quarterfinal round, the first-place team from each group is matched against a second-place team from another group in a playoff series. Through the 2007–08 season, the series was best-of-three, and expanded to best-of-five for 2008–09. Home advantage in the series goes to the first-place team.

The Final Four, held at a predetermined site, features the winners of the four quarterfinal series in one-off knockout matches. The semifinal losers play for third place; the winners play for the championship.

The 2010 Final Four was held on 7 and 9 May at Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy in Paris. The 2011 Final Four was held at Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona.

For the 2012–13 Euroleague season the Top 16 was changed from four groups of four teams to two groups of eight teams. The four best teams in each group will go on the quarterfinals.

Qualifications

The league usually, but not always, includes domestic champions from the leading countries. Depending on the country, places in the Euroleague may be awarded on the basis of:

  • Performance in the previous season's domestic league.
  • Performance over the previous two or three domestic seasons.
  • Contracts with Euroleague Basketball Company.
  • In addition, the winner of the previous season's Eurocup receives a place.

For example, two 2007–08 domestic champions from ULEB member countries did not compete in the 2008–09 EuroleagueZadar (Croatia) and Hapoel Holon (Israel). Zadar played in the second-level Eurocup in 2008–09. Hapoel Holon, however, did not compete in any of the three European continental club competitions—not even the third-tier EuroChallenge (which is run by FIBA Europe instead of Euroleague Basketball Company)—because of financial difficulties.

Starting with the 2009–10 season, the entrance criteria changed:

  • A number of clubs chosen via a formula based on competitive performance, television revenues, and home attendance, receive "A Licenses", giving them automatic entry into the Euroleague regular season phase. Originally, 13 clubs received A Licenses, with Asseco Prokom Gdynia of Poland becoming the 14th before the 2011–12 season.[8] A Licenses are awarded for three years, meaning that the next adjustment of A Licenses will not take place until 2012–13. However, Euroleague Basketball Company suspended the A License of Virtus Roma after the club finished in the bottom half of its domestic league in 2010–11.[9]
  • Eight clubs receive one-year "B Licenses" into the Euroleague regular season. Seven of them are directly based on the ranking of the domestic league in which the club competes. The eighth is a three-year "wild card" license based on similar factors to the A Licenses; the first such license was awarded to ASVEL Basket of France.
  • The winner of the previous year's Eurocup receives a one-year "C License" into the Euroleague regular season. If the club qualifies for a direct B License into the regular season via its domestic league, the C License will be awarded to the club not already qualified for the regular season that is highest on the Euroleague entry list.
  • Eight other clubs receive one-year "B Licenses" into the Euroleague qualifying rounds, with two advancing into the regular season.

Teams with A license

           

Teams that lost the A license

Arena standards

Effective as of the 2012–13 season, Euroleague clubs with an "A License" must host their home matches in arenas that have a seating capacity of at least 10,000 people. In 2008, Euroleague Basketball Company decided to increase the arena seating requirement to 10,000 within four years time in order to force clubs to move into and/or build bigger arenas. This was done in hopes of increasing revenues through more ticket sales. Non "A License" Euroleague clubs must play in arenas that seat at least 5,000 people.

Current teams

These are the teams that participate in the 2015–16 season:

Finals

Year Final Third and fourth place
Champion Score Second place
1958
Details

ASK Riga
170–152
(86–81 / 71–84)

Academic

Honvéd

Real Madrid
1958–59
Details

ASK Riga
148–125
(79–58 / 67–69)

Academic

OKK Belgrade

Lech Poznań
1959–60
Details

ASK Riga
130–113
(51–61 / 69–62)

Dinamo Tbilisi

Polonia Warsaw

Slovan Orbis Prague
1960–61
Details

CSKA Moscow
148–128
(87–62 / 66–61)

ASK Riga

Real Madrid

Steaua București
1961–62
Details

Dinamo Tbilisi
90–83
Real Madrid

AŠK Olimpija

CSKA Moscow
1962–63
Details

CSKA Moscow
259–240
(86–69 / 91–74 / 99–80)

Real Madrid

Spartak ZJŠ Brno

Dinamo Tbilisi
1963–64
Details

Real Madrid
183–174
(110–99 / 84–64)

Spartak ZJŠ Brno

OKK Belgrade

Olimpia Milano (Simmenthal)
1964–65
Details

Real Madrid
157–150
(88–81 / 76–62)

CSKA Moscow

Varèse (Ignis)

OKK Belgrade
1965–66
Details

Olimpia Milano (Simmenthal)
77–72
Slavia Prague

CSKA Moscow

AEK
1966–67
Details

Real Madrid
91–83
Olimpia Milano (Simmenthal)

AŠK Olimpija

Slavia Prague
1967–68
Details

Real Madrid
98–95
Spartak ZJŠ Brno

Olimpia Milano (Simmenthal)

Zadar
1968–69
Details

CSKA Moscow
103–99 (2 OT's)
Real Madrid

Spartak ZJŠ Brno

Standard Liège
1969–70
Details

Varèse (Ignis)
79–74
CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid

Slavia Prague
1970–71
Details

CSKA Moscow
67–53
Varèse (Ignis)

Real Madrid

Slavia Prague
1971–72
Details

Varèse (Ignis)
70–69
Split (Jugoplastika)

Real Madrid

Panathinaikos
1972–73
Details

Varèse (Ignis)
71–66
CSKA Moscow

Crvena Zvezda

Olimpia Milano (Simmenthal)
1973–74
Details

Real Madrid
84–82
Varèse (Ignis)

Radnički Belgrade

Berck
1974–75
Details

Varèse (Ignis)
79–66
Real Madrid

Berck

Zadar
1975–76
Details

Varèse (Mobilgirgi)
81–74
Real Madrid

Cantù (Forst)

ASVEL
1976–77
Details

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)
78–77
Varèse (Mobilgirgi)

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid
1977–78
Details

Real Madrid
75–67
Varèse (Mobilgirgi)

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

ASVEL
1978–79
Details

Bosna
75–67
Varèse (Emerson)

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Real Madrid
1979–80
Details

Real Madrid
89–85
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Bosna

Virtus Bologna (Sinudyne)
1980–81
Details

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)
80–79
Virtus Bologna (Sinudyne)

Den Bosch (Nashua)

Bosna
1981–82
Details

Cantù (Squibb)
86–80
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Partizan

FC Barcelona
1982–83
Details

Cantù (Ford)
69–68
Olimpia Milano (Billy)

Real Madrid

CSKA Moscow
1983–84
Details

Virtus Roma (Banco di Roma)
79–73
FC Barcelona

Cantù (Jollycolombani)

Bosna
1984–85
Details

Cibona
87–78
Real Madrid

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

CSKA Moscow
1985–86
Details

Cibona
94–82
Žalgiris

Olimpia Milano (Simac)

Real Madrid
1986–87
Details

Olimpia Milano (Tracer)
71–69
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Orthez

Zadar
1987–88
Details

Olimpia Milano (Tracer)
90–84
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Partizan

Aris
1988–89
Details

Split (Jugoplastika)
75–69
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Aris

FC Barcelona
1989–90
Details

Split (Jugoplastika)
72–67
FC Barcelona

Limoges

Aris
1990–91
Details

Split (Pop 84)
70–65
FC Barcelona

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Victoria Libertas Pesaro (Scavolini)
1991–92
Details

Partizan
71–70
Joventut Badalona (Montigalà)

Olimpia Milano (Philips)

Estudiantes (Caja Postal)
1992–93
Details

Limoges
59–55
Treviso (Benetton)

PAOK

Real Madrid
1993–94
Details

Joventut Badalona (7Up)
59–57
Olympiacos

Panathinaikos

FC Barcelona
1994–95
Details

Real Madrid
73–61
Olympiacos

Panathinaikos

Limoges
1995–96
Details

Panathinaikos
67–66
FC Barcelona

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid
1996–97
Details

Olympiacos
73–58
FC Barcelona

Olimpija (Smelt)

ASVEL
1997–98
Details

Virtus Bologna (Kinder)
58–44
AEK

Treviso (Benetton)

Partizan
1998–99
Details

Žalgiris
82–74
Virtus Bologna (Kinder)

Olympiacos

Fortitudo Bologna (Teamsystem)
1999–00
Details

Panathinaikos
73–67
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Efes Pilsen

FC Barcelona
2000–01
Details

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)
81–67
Panathinaikos

Efes Pilsen

CSKA Moscow
2000–01
Details

Virtus Bologna (Kinder)
3–2
(65–78 / 94–73 / 60–80 / 96–79 / 82–74)

Baskonia (Tau Cerámica)

Fortitudo Bologna (Paf Wennington)

AEK
2001–02
Details

Panathinaikos
89–83
Virtus Bologna (Kinder)

Treviso (Benetton)

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)
2002–03
Details

FC Barcelona
76–65
Treviso (Benetton)

Siena (Montepaschi)

CSKA Moscow
2003–04
Details

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)
118–74
Fortitudo Bologna (Skipper)

CSKA Moscow

Siena (Montepaschi)
2004–05
Details

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)
90–78
Baskonia (Tau Cerámica)

Panathinaikos

CSKA Moscow
2005–06
Details

CSKA Moscow
73–69
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Baskonia (Tau Cerámica)

FC Barcelona
2006–07
Details

Panathinaikos
93–91
CSKA Moscow

Málaga (Unicaja)

Baskonia (Tau Cerámica)
2007–08
Details

CSKA Moscow
91–77
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Elite)

Siena (Montepaschi)

Baskonia (Tau Cerámica)
2008–09
Details

Panathinaikos
73–71
CSKA Moscow

FC Barcelona (Regal)

Olympiacos
2009–10
Details

FC Barcelona (Regal)
86–68
Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Partizan
2010–11
Details

Panathinaikos
78–70
Maccabi Tel Aviv (Electra)

Siena (Montepaschi)

Real Madrid
2011–12
Details

Olympiacos
62–61
CSKA Moscow

FC Barcelona (Regal)

Panathinaikos
2012–13
Details

Olympiacos
100–88
Real Madrid

CSKA Moscow

FC Barcelona (Regal)
2013–14
Details

Maccabi Tel Aviv (Electra)
98–86 (OT)
Real Madrid

FC Barcelona

CSKA Moscow
2014–15
Details

Real Madrid
78–59
Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Fenerbahçe (Ülker)

Titles by club

Rank Club Titles Runner-up Champion Years
1. Real Madrid 9 8 1963–64, 1964–65, 1966–67, 1967–68, 1973–74, 1977–78, 1979–80, 1994–95, 2014–15
2. Maccabi Tel Aviv 6 9 1976–77, 1980–81, 2000–01, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2013–14
3. CSKA Moscow 6 6 1960–61, 1962–63, 1968–69, 1970–71, 2005–06, 2007–08
4. Panathinaikos 6 1 1995–96, 1999–00, 2001–02, 2006–07, 2008–09, 2010–11
5. Varèse 5 5 1969–70, 1971–72, 1972–73, 1974–75, 1975–76
6. Olympiacos 3 4 1996–97, 2011–12, 2012–13
7. Olimpia Milano 3 2 1965–66, 1986–87, 1987–88
8. ASK Riga 3 1 1958, 1958–59, 1959–60
9. Split 3 1 1988–89, 1989–90, 1990–91
10. FC Barcelona 2 5 2002–03, 2009–10
11. Virtus Bologna 2 3 1997–98, 2000–01
12. Cantù 2 1981–82, 1982–83
13. Cibona 2 1984–85, 1985–86
14. Dinamo Tbilisi 1 1 1961–62
15. Joventut Badalona 1 1 1993–94
16. Žalgiris 1 1 1998–99
17. Bosna 1 1978–79
18. Virtus Roma 1 1983–84
19. Partizan 1 1991–92
20. Limoges 1 1992–93
21. Academic 2
22. Brno 2
23. Treviso 2
24. Baskonia 2
25. Slavia Prague 1
26. AEK 1
27. Fortitudo Bologna 1

Titles by nation

Rank Country Titles Runners-up
1. Italy 13 13
2. Spain 12 16
3. Greece 9 6
4. Soviet Union 8 6
5. Israel 6 9
6. Yugoslavia 6 1
7. Russia 2 3
8. Yugoslavia 1
9. France 1
10. Lithuania 1
11. Czechoslovakia 3
12. Bulgaria 2

Euroleague awards

Records

Euroleague versus NBA games

Statistical leaders

All-time leaders

Since the beginning of the 2000–01 season (Euroleague Basketball Company era):

Average Accumulated
Points Alphonso Ford 22.22 Juan Carlos Navarro 3,674
Rebounds Joseph Blair 10.05 Felipe Reyes 1,343
Assists Omar Cook 5.18 Dimitris Diamantidis 1,146
Steals Emanuel Ginóbili 2.73 Dimitris Diamantidis 414
Blocks Shawn James 1.55 Fran Vázquez 241
Index Rating Anthony Parker 21.41 Dimitris Diamantidis 3,538

Individual performances

Media coverage

Sponsors

See also

References

  1. ^ "– Euroleague, Turkish Airlines sign strategic partnership deal". Euroleague.net. 26 July 2010. 
  2. ^ "Euroleague Basketball, Televisión Española (TVE) reach agreement in principle to broadcast Real Madrid's Turkish Airlines Euroleague games". Euroleague.net. 19 March 2013. 
  3. ^ "– CSPN China to broadcast Turkish Airlines Euroleague". Euroleague.net. 16 December 2010. 
  4. ^ "Television coverage set to break Final Four records". Euroleague.net. 14 May 2014. 
  5. ^ "Turkish Airlines And Euroleague Basketball Sign Strategic Partnership Agreememt" (Press release). Euroleague Basketball. 28 July 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2010. 
  6. ^ "An important strategic partnership agreement between Turkish Airlines and Euroleague Basketball..." (Press release). Turkish Airlines. 26 July 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2010. 
  7. ^ "Turkish Airlines, Euroleague Basketball Cement Partnership Through 2020". turkishairlines.com. 23 October 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2015. 
  8. ^ "Euroleague assembly meets before 2011–12 draw" (Press release). Euroleague Basketball. 7 July 2011. Retrieved 1 August 2011. 
  9. ^ "New teams proposed as 2011–12 Turkish Airlines Euroleague participants" (Press release). Euroleague Basketball. 30 June 2011. Retrieved 1 August 2011. 
  10. ^ "Partizan sets crowd record at Belgrade Arena!". Euroleague.net. 5 March 2009. Retrieved 6 March 2009. 
  11. ^ Euroleague.net Radivoj Korac's 99 points.

External links

  • Official website
  • List of Winners with Rosters
  • Euroleague history – stats
  • InterBasket.net Euroleague basketball forum
  • Euroleague's Youtube channel
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