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Diya (lamp)

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Title: Diya (lamp)  
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Subject: Indian pottery, Upachara, Vibhuti, Votive candle, Laser lamp
Collection: Fire in Hindu Worship, Indian Pottery, Lamps, Objects Used in Hindu Worship, Types of Lamp
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Diya (lamp)

Diya
Two diya with oil
A diya with multiple wicks
Diya on balcony ledge
Earthen oil diya used for Diwali
A diya on top of a rangoli
Diya floating on river Ganges
Diya, or oil lamp, in different forms.

A diya, divaa, deepa, deepam, or deepak is an oil lamp, usually made from clay, with a cotton wick dipped in ghee or vegetable oils.

Clay diyas are often used temporarily as lighting for special occasions, while diyas made of brass are permanent fixtures in homes and temples. Diyas are native to India, and are often used in Hindu, Sikh, Jain and Zoroastrian religious festivals such as Diwali[1] or the Kushti ceremony. A similar lamp called a butter lamp is used in Tibetan Buddhist offerings as well. Diyas, also known as deepam in Tamil Nadu, can be lighted, especially during the Karthikai Deepam.

Traditional use

A diya placed in temples and used to bless worshippers is referred to as an aarti.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Diwali: Significance of a Diya". Zee Media Corporation Ltd. Retrieved July 19, 2013. 


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