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Directive on Electricity Production from Renewable Energy Sources

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Directive on Electricity Production from Renewable Energy Sources

European Union directive:
Directive 2001/77/EC
DIRECTIVE 2001/77/EC OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

of 27 September 2001 on the promotion of electricity produced from renewable energy sources in the internal electricity market

Made by European Parliament & Council
Made under
Journal reference
History
Made
Came into force
Preparative texts
Other legislation
Replaced by Directive 2009/28/EC
Status: Repealed

The Directive on Electricity Production from Renewable Energy Sources is a European Union directive for promoting renewable energy use in electricity generation. It is officially named 2001/77/EC and popularly known as the RES Directive.

The directive, which took effect in October 2001, sets national indicative targets for renewable energy production from individual member states. As the name implies, the EU does not strictly enforce these targets. However, The European Commission monitors the progress of the member states of the European Union – and will, if necessary, propose mandatory targets for those who miss their goals.

These objectives contribute toward achieving the overall indicative EU targets, which are listed in the white paper on renewable sources of energy. Regulators want a 12 per cent share of gross renewable domestic energy consumption by 2010 – and a 20 per cent share by 2020.

National targets

The following table lists the indicative targets for each of the 15 original member states, and for comparison the share of renewable electricity in 1997 as well.

Country % in 1997 target (%) in 2010
Belgium 1,1 6
Denmark 8,7 29
Germany 4,5 12,5
Greece 8,6 20,1
Spain 19,9 29,4
France 15 21
Ireland 3,6 13,2
Italy 16 25
Luxembourg 2,1 5,7
Netherlands 3,5 9
Austria 70 78,1
Portugal 38,5 39
Finland 24,7 31,5
Sweden 49,1 60
United Kingdom 1,7 10,0
European Community overall 13,9 22

See also

External links

  • Official Commission page on the RES directive
  • "Renewable energy: the promotion of electricity from renewable energy sources" – from the official “Summaries of EU legislation” website
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