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Demographics of the Middle East

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Title: Demographics of the Middle East  
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Demographics of the Middle East

The Demographics of the Middle East describes populations in the Middle East.

The population growth rate in the Middle East is among the highest in the world. The high population growth brings challenges in the Middle East societies. During 1990-2008 the growth rate was higher than e.g. in India or China. In the 17 Middle East countries, as in the table included, population growth during 1990-2008 was 108.7 million persons and 44% growth. In comparison, population in India increased from 1990 to 2008 with 290 million (34%), China 92 million (17%) and European Union (27) 26 million (5%).[1]

Overview

Population growth [1]
# 1990 2008 2010 1990-2008 Growth %
Million 1990-08 1990-10
1 Bahrain 0.49 0.77 1.26 0.3 56% 157%
2 Cyprus 0.58 0.80 0.80 0.2 38% 38%
3 Egypt 57.79 81.53 81.12 23.7 41% 40%
4 Iran 54.40 71.96 73.97 17.6 32% 36%
5 Iraq 18.14 28.22 32.32 10.1 56% 78%
6 Israel 4.68 7.31 7.62 2.6 56% 63%
7 Jordan 3.17 5.91 6.05 2.7 86% 91%
8 Kuwait 2.13 2.73 2.74 0.6 28% 29%
9 Lebanon 2.97 4.14 4.23 1.2 39% 42%
10 Oman 1.84 2.79 2.78 0.9 51% 51%
11 Palestine 1.90 3.91 4.12 2.0 106% 117%
12 Qatar 0.47 1.28 1.76 0.8 174% 274%
13 Saudi Arabia 16.38 24.65 27.45 8.3 50% 68%
14 Syria 12.72 21.23 20.45 8.5 67% 61%
15 Turkey 55.12 71.08 72.85 16.0 29% 32%
16 UAE 1.87 4.37 7.51 2.5 134% 302%
17 Yemen 12.31 23.05 24.05 10.7 87% 95%
x Total 246.96 355.73 371.08 66.9 51 % 61%
x World 5,265.2 6,687.9 6,825 1,422.7 27 % 30%
Source: OECD/World Bank
IEA definition of Middle East

IEA (2010) defined Middle East as Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates and Yemen.[1] According to this definition, Middle East population was 127 million in 1990 and 205 million in 2010.[1]

Alternate definitions of Middle East

According to OECD/World Bank from 1990 to 2008 population increased most in the Middle East as millions of peoples in Egypt 23.7 million, Iran 17.6 million, Turkey 16 million, Yemen 10.7 million and Iraq 10.1 million. In Qatar (174%), UAE (134%) and Palestine (106% by US Census) population more than doubled from 1990 to 2008.[1]

17 Middle East countries, as listed in the table, population in 2008 was 356 million persons i.e. 5.3% of the world population 6,688 in 2008. This was compared to the countries of the EU 72% (498.7 million), OECD North America 80% (444.4 million), Latin America 77% (462.0 million) and former Soviet Union 125% (284.6 million). According to OECD/World Bank 67% of the world population lived in 2008 in China 19.9% (1332,62 million), other Asia 32.6% (2182,97 million) or Africa 14.7% (984,25 million).[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Population 1971-2010 (pdf pages 89) IEA (OECD/ World Bank) (original population ref OECD/ World Bank e.g. in IEA Key World Energy Statistics 2010 page 57)
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