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Customs Regulation 1383/2003

 

Customs Regulation 1383/2003

Regulation (EC) No. 1383/03
European Union regulation
Title Regulation concerning customs action against goods suspected of infringing certain intellectual property rights and the measures to be taken against goods found to have infringed such rights
Made by Council
Made under Art. 133
Journal reference L196, pp. 7-14
History
Date made 2003-07-22
Came into force 2003-08-09
Other legislation
Replaces Customs Regulation 3295/94
Repealed

Customs Regulation 1383/2003, the full title of which is Regulation concerning customs action against goods suspected of infringing certain intellectual property rights and the measures to be taken against goods found to have infringed such rights, is a measure passed under Article 133 (formerly Article 113) of the EC Treaty. The provision is designed to protect the intellectual property rights of constituents of member nations.

The provision encourages EU Member States to facilitate cooperation between their respective customs agencies in preventing IP infringement.[1] It supersedes Customs Regulation 3295/94, with the new provision having taken effect (and the former provision expiring) on July 1, 2004.[2]

The provision permits owners of intellectual property rights "to prohibit entry into the EU and the export or re-export from the EU, of goods infringing: trade marks, copyright, patents, national or Community plant variety rights, designations of origin or geographical indications and geographical designations".[3]

The EU Customs Regulation 608/2013 came into force on July 19, 2013 and replaced the former Regulation 1383/2003.

References

  1. ^ Jean-Luc Piotraut, European National IP Laws Under the EU Umbrella: From National to European Community IP Law, 2 Loy. Int'l L. Rev. 61, 84 (2005).
  2. ^ Customs Regulation 3295/94 is repealed with effect from 1 July 2004. Article 24 of Council Regulation (EC) No 1383/2003 of 22 July 2003 concerning customs action against goods suspected of infringing certain intellectual property rights and the measures to be taken against goods found to have infringed such rights.
  3. ^ Bradley J. Olson, Esq.; Michael R. Graham, Esq.; John Maltbie, Esq.; and Ron Epperson, The 10 Things Every Practitioner should Know about Anti-Counterfeiting and Anti-Piracy Protection, 7 J. High Tech. L. 106, 157 (2007).

See also


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