World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Chibcha language

Chibcha
Muisca, Muysccubun
Region Central highlands of Colombia
Ethnicity Muisca
Extinct ca. 1800[1]
Chibchan
  • Chibcha–Motilon
    • Chibcha–Tunebo
      • Chibcha
Language codes
ISO 639-2 chb
ISO 639-3 chb
Glottolog chib1270[2]

Chibcha is an extinctlanguage of Colombia, formerly spoken by the Muisca people, a complex indigenous civilization of South America of what today is the country of Colombia.

As early as 1580 the authorities in Charcas, Quito, and Santa Fe de Bogotá mandated the establishment of schools in native languages and required that priests study these languages before ordination. In 1606 the entire clergy was ordered to provide religious instruction in Chibcha. The Chibcha language declined in the 18th century, however.[3]

In 1770, King Charles III of Spain officially banned use of the language in the region [3] as part of a de-indigenization project. The ban remained in law until Colombia passed its constitution of 1991.

Words of Muysccubun origin are still used in the departments of Cundinamarca of which Bogotá is the capital, and Boyacá. These include curuba (a fruit), toche (a bird), guadua (a large bamboo used in construction) and tatacoa (a snake). The Muisca descendants continue many traditional ways, such as the use of certain foods, use of coca for teas and healing rituals, and other aspects of natural ways, which are a deep part of culture here.

The only public school in Colombia currently teaching Chibcha (to about 150 children) is in the town of Cota, about 20 miles by road from Bogotá. The school is named Jizcamox (healing with the hands) in Chibcha.[4]

References

  1. ^ Chibcha at MultiTree on the Linguist List
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Chibcha".  
  3. ^ a b "Chibcha Dictionary and Grammar".  
  4. ^ Gloria Helena Rey, "The Chibcha Culture – Forgotten, But Still Alive", Colombia, Inter Press Service (IPS) News, 30 Nov 2007, accessed 9 Nov 2010

Further reading (in Spanish)

  • Teresa Arango, Precolombia: Introducción al estudio del indígena colombiano (PreColombia: Introduction to the Study of Colombian Indigenous People), Madrid: Sucesores de Rivadeneyra, 1954
  • (Pre-Hispanic Colombia: Archeological Regions)Colombia prehispánica: regiones arqueológicasÁlvaro Botiva Contreras, Leonor Herrera, Ana Maria Groot, Santiago Mora, , Instituto colombiano de Antropología Colcultura, 1989
  • Central Andean Region, Vol. IV, Geografía Humana de Colombia (Human Geography of Colombia), Bogotá: Instituto Colombiano de Cultura Hispánica, Digital publishing on the Virtual Library of the Biblioteca Luis Angel Arango Banco de la República.
  • Rafael Martín and José Puentes, Culturas indígenas colombianas (Indigenous Cultures of Colombia)
  • Javier Ocampo Lopez, "Mitos y leyendas populares de Boyacá" (Popular Myths and Legends of Boyacá), in El pueblo boyacenses e su folcior (The Boacense Village and Its Folklore), Digital publishing on the Virtual Library of the Biblioteca Luis Angel Arango Banco de la República (Luis Angel Arango Library of Bank of the Republic)
  • Miguel Triana, La civilización chibcha (1921) (The Chibcha Civilisation)
  • Luis Eduardo Wiesner Gracia, "Etnografía muisca" (Muisca Ethnography), in Central Andean Region, Vol. IV, Geografía Humana de Colombia (Human Geography of Colombia), Bogotá: Instituto Colombiano de Cultura Hispánica, Digital publishing on the Virtual Library of the Biblioteca Luis Angel Arango Banco de la República

External links

  • "Diccionario y gramática chibcha".  
  • Muyskkubun Project, in Spanish, with Muyskkubun–Spanish dictionary
  • "Chibcha", Archives, sources in Spanish on the Chibcha language, Rosetta Project
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.