World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Campeonato Brasileiro Série C

Article Id: WHEBN0006070234
Reproduction Date:

Title: Campeonato Brasileiro Série C  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Campeonato Brasileiro Série B, Aloísio da Silva Filho, Clube Atlético Sorocaba, Linhares Esporte Clube, Bacabal Esporte Clube
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Campeonato Brasileiro Série C

Campeonato Brasileiro Série C
Country  Brazil
Confederation CONMEBOL
Founded 1981
Number of teams 20
Level on pyramid 3
Promotion to Série B
Relegation to Série D
Current champions Macaé
(2014)
Most championships Atlético Goianiense (2 titles)
TV partners Esporte Interativo
TV Brasil
Website http://www.cbf.com.br/seriec
2015 Campeonato Brasileiro Série C

The Campeonato Brasileiro Série C is the third tier of the Brazilian football league system.

Unlike the first and second divisions, the Série C is not played in a double round robin system, arguably because many participating teams lack the financial conditions to travel long distances. Thus, the tournament is organized in regional groups and the table prevents teams from distant states to play each other in the initial rounds.

Until 2008, any professional team could apply, but only 64 teams would take part in the tournament. The teams that had been relegated from Série B in the previous year were joined by teams qualified for each federation state. Qualification rules varied, some federations used the state tournaments as qualification tournaments, others organized exclusive qualification tournaments to the Série C.

Beginning in 2009, Série C was reduced from 64 teams to 20 and a new Campeonato Brasileiro Série D is the qualifier for Brazilian league football. In its current format the 20 teams are dived into 2 groups and each team plays all opponents from its own group on home and away matches. The top four teams of each group qualify to a knock out stage and the four semifinalists are promoted to Campeonato Brasileiro Série B. The bottom two teams of each group are relegated to Campeonato Brasileiro Série D.

History and past champions

Official champions

The Campeonato Brasileiro has existed ever since 1971. However, there have been many years when no third division tournament took place. In most cases it was because the two elite divisions had too many clubs (in 1989, for instance, 96 teams contested the second division[1]). The following table shows the winners and runners-up of the Série C tournaments played as from 1981, according to the Brazilian Football Confederation:[2]

Year Winner Score Runner-up Comments
1981
Details
Olaria
 RJ
4 − 0
0 − 1
(1)
1982–1987 Not held
1988
Details
1 − 1
2 − 2
União São João declared champions due to more points scored during the championship.
1989 Not held
1990
Details
0 − 0
0 − 0
Atlético Goianiense won 3-2 on penalties.
1991 Not held
1992
Details
0 − 2
3 − 1
Tuna Luso declared champions due to more points scored during the championship.
1993 Not held
1994
Details
1 − 0
5 − 0
1995
Details
2 − 0
1 − 0
1996
Details
2 − 1
1 − 0
1997
Details
From 1997 to 1999, the championship had no final match. The four best teams of the Fourth Round played against each other, and the team with most points were declared champions.
1998
Details
1999
Details
2000 Not held
2001
Details
(2) From 2001 to 2005, the championship had no final match. The four best teams of the Fourth Round played against each other, and the team with most points were declared champions.Only two teams were promoted.
2002
Details
2003
Details
2004
Details
2005
Details
2006
Details
From 2006 to 2008, the championship had no final match. The eight best teams of the Fourth Round played against each other, and the team with most points were declared champions. Top 4 teams ascend to Série B
2007
Details
2008
Details
2009
Details
3 − 1
1 − 0
From 2009 on, the championship is divided in four groups of five clubs each, playing against each other twice within their groups. The two best-placed teams of each group qualify to the knockout stage, played in two legs. The final is played in two legs. The quarterfinal winners ascend to Série B.[3]
2010
Details
1 − 0
0 − 0
(3)
2011
Details
3 − 1
4 − 0
2012
Details
0 − 0
2 − 0
2013
Details
0 − 0
2 − 1
2014
Details
1 − 1
3 − 3
1 Associação Atlética Santo Amaro is named presently named Manchete.
2 Etti Jundiaí was later renamed Paulista./div>
3 Ituiutaba was later renamed Boa Esporte Clube./div>

Unofficial champions

The following season is not officially recognized by the CBF:[2][4]

Year Winner Score Runner-up Comments
2000
Details

Malutrom
1 − 1
3 − 2

Uberlândia
It was the Green and White modules of the Copa João Havelange.

Titles by team

Club State Titles
Atlético Goianiense 2 titles
ABC 1 title
América-MG 1 title
Avaí 1 title
Bragantino 1 title
Brasiliense 1 title
Criciúma 1 title
Etti Jundiaí (Paulista) 1 title
Fluminense 1 title
Ituano 1 title
Joinville 1 title
Macaé 1 title
Novorizontino 1 title
Oeste 1 title
Olaria 1 title
Remo 1 title
Sampaio Corrêa 1 title
Santa Cruz 1 title
Tuna Luso 1 title
União Barbarense 1 title
União São João 1 title
Vila Nova 1 title
XV de Piracicaba 1 title

Titles by state

State Titles
8 titles
3 titles
3 titles
3 titles
2 titles
1 title
1 title
1 title
1 title
1 title

References

  1. ^ http://www.rsssfbrasil.com/tablesae/br1989l2.htm
  2. ^ a b (Portuguese)
  3. ^ http://www.cbf.com.br/seriec/tabela2009.html
  4. ^

External links

  • CBF Confederação Brasileira de Futebol - Brazilian Football Confederation
  • RSSSF Brazil links


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.