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Burid dynasty

Burid dynasty

1104–1154
the Near east in 1135
Capital Damascus
Languages Arabic
Turkish
Persian
Religion Sunni Islam
Government Emirate
Emir
 •  1104-1128 Toghtekin (first)
 •  1140–1154 Mujir ad-Din Abaq (last)
History
 •  Established 1104
 •  Disestablished 1154
Currency Dinar

The Burid dynasty was a Turkish dynasty[1] which ruled over Damascus in the early 12th century. The first Burid ruler, Toghtekin,[2] began as a servant to the Seljuk ruler of Damascus, Duqaq. Following Duqaq's death in 1104, he seized the city for himself.

The dynasty was named after Toghtekin's son, Taj al-Muluk Buri. The Burids gained recognition from the Abbasid caliphate in return for considerable gifts. In return, the caliphate did not interfere in the emirate.[1] They ruled the city until 1154, when it was taken by the Zengid ruler of Aleppo, Nur ed-Din.[3]

The Burids lost to the Crusaders in the battle of Marj al-Saffar (1126) but were able to prevent the Crusaders from capturing Damascus.

Burid Emirs of Damascus

Titular Name(s) Personal Name Reign
Amir
أمیر
Saif-ul-Islam
سیف الاسلام
Zahir-ud-din Toghtekin
ظاھر الدین طغتکین
1104–1128
Amir
أمیر
Taj-ul-Mulk Buri
تاج الملک بوری
1128–1132
Amir
أمیر
Shams-ul-Mulk Isma'il
شمس الملک اسماعیل
1132–1135
Amir
أمیر
Shihab-ud-din Mahmud
شھاب الدین محمود
1135–1139
Amir
أمیر
Jamal-ud-din Muhammad
جمال الدین محمد
1139–1140
Amir
أمیر
Mu'in-ud-din Unur
معین الدین أنر
1140–1149
Regent
Amir
أمیر
Mujir-ud-din
مجیر الدین
Abu Saʿid Ābaq
ابو سعید ابق
1140–1154
Zengid dynasty replaces the Burid dynasty.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Burids, R. LeTourneau, The Encyclopedia of Islam, Vol. I, ed. H.A.R.Gibb, J.H.Kramers, E. Levi Provencal and J. Schacht, (Brill, 1986), 1332.
  2. ^ D.S. Richards, The Chronicle of Ibn Al-Athir for the Crusading Period from Al-Kamil Fi'l-ta-Ta'rikh, (Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2010), 16.
  3. ^ Medieval Islamic Civilization: L-Z, Ed. Josef W. Meri, Jere L. Bacharach, (Taylor & Francis, 2006), 568.
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