World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Asturian cuisine

Article Id: WHEBN0003789515
Reproduction Date:

Title: Asturian cuisine  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of pork dishes, European cuisine, List of European cuisines, Middle Eastern cuisine, Food
Collection: Asturian Cuisine
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Asturian cuisine

Fabada Asturiana with Sidra, a typical dish of Asturias

Asturian cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients found in the cuisine of the Asturias region of Spain.

Contents

  • Foods 1
    • Cheeses 1.1
  • Dishes 2
  • Beverages 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Foods

Asturias is especially known for its seafood, such as fresh squid, crab, shrimp and sea bass. Salmon are caught in Asturian rivers, notably the Sella; the first fish of the season is called campanu (Bable word for campana), a bell tolled to signal the first catch.

Cheeses

Queso de Cabrales

Asturian cheeses, especially Cabrales, are also famous throughout Spain and beyond; Cabrales is known for its pungent odour and strong flavour. Asturias is often called "the land of cheeses" (el pais de los quesos) due to the product's diversity and quality in this region. Other famous cheeses are:

Dishes

The most famous regional dish is Fabada Asturiana, a rich stew made with the Asturian typical large white beans (Fabes de la Granja), pork shoulder (llacón), morcilla, chorizo, and saffron (azafrán). Other fou

Other major dishes include beans with clams (fabes con almejas), Asturian stew, cachopo, frixuelos, and rice pudding.

Asturian cider being poured in the traditional manner.

Beverages

Apple groves foster the production of the traditional alcoholic drink, a natural cider (sidra). It is a very dry cider, and unlike French or English natural ciders, uses predominantly acidic apples, rather than sweet or bittersweet. The proportions are: acidic 40%, sub-acidic 30-25%, sweet 10-15%, bittersweet 15-20%, bitter 5%.[1]

Sidra is traditionally poured in by an expert server (or escanciador): the bottle is raised high above his or her head to oxygenate the brew as it moves into the glass below. A small amount (~120ml) is poured at a time (called a culín), as it must be drunk immediately before the sidra loses its carbonation. Any sidra left in the glass is poured onto a woodchip-strewn floor or a trough along the bottom of the bar.

See also

References

  1. ^ Museo de la Sidra, Nava (Asturias), Spain.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.