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Argentina national football team

Argentina
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) La Albiceleste (The White and Sky Blue)
Association Argentine Football Association (AFA)
Confederation CONMEBOL (South America)
Head coach Gerardo Martino
Captain Lionel Messi
Most caps Javier Zanetti (145)
Top scorer Gabriel Batistuta (56)
Home stadium Antonio Vespucio Liberti (El Monumental)
FIFA ranking
Current 1 (1 October 2015)
Highest 1 (March 2007, October 2007 – June 2008, July–October 2015)
Lowest 24 (August 1996)
Elo ranking
Current 2 (10 July 2015)
Highest 1 (July 2007)
Lowest 28 (June 1990)
First international
 Uruguay 2–3 Argentina
(Montevideo, Uruguay; 16 May 1901)[1]
Biggest win
 Argentina 12–0 Ecuador 
(Montevideo, Uruguay; 22 January 1942
Biggest defeat

Czechoslovakia 6–1 Argentina
(Helsingborg, Sweden; 15 May 1958)

Bolivia 6–1 Argentina
(La Paz, Bolivia; 28 September 2009)
World Cup
Appearances 16 (First in 1930)
Best result Champions, 1978 and 1986
Copa América
Appearances 40 (First in 1916)
Best result Champions, 1921, 1925, 1927, 1929, 1937, 1941, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1991 and 1993
Confederations Cup
Appearances 3 (First in 1992)
Best result Champions, 1992

The Argentina national football team (Spanish: Selección de fútbol de Argentina) represents Argentina in football and is controlled by the Argentine Football Association (AFA), the governing body for football in Argentina. Argentina's home stadium is Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti.

La Selección (national team), also known as the Albicelestes (sky blue and whites), has appeared in five World Cup finals, including the first final in 1930, which they lost, 4–2, to Uruguay. Argentina won in their next final appearance in 1978, beating the Netherlands at extra time, 3–1. Argentina, led by Diego Maradona won again in 1986, a 3–2 victory over West Germany. They again made the World Cup finals in 1990, and lost, 1–0, to West Germany after conceding a penalty kick in the 85th minute. Argentina made their fifth appearance in a World Cup final in 2014, again losing to Germany, 1–0 during extra-time. Argentina's World Cup winning managers are César Luis Menotti in 1978, and Carlos Bilardo in 1986.

Argentina has been very successful in the Copa América, winning it 14 times and also winning the 'extra' South American Championships in 1941, 1945 and 1946. The team also won the FIFA Confederations Cup and the Kirin Cup, both in 1992, and the Argentine olympic team won the Olympics football tournaments in Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008.[2]

Argentina and France are the only two national teams that have won the three most important men's titles recognized by FIFA: the World Cup, the Confederations Cup, and the Olympic tournament. They have both also won their respective continental championship (Copa América for Argentina, and UEFA European Championship for France).[3][4]

Argentina is known for having rivalries with Brazil, Uruguay, England and Germany due to historic occurrences with one another throughout football history.[5][6]

Argentina also won six of the 14 football competitions at the Pan American Games, winning in 1951, 1955, 1959, 1971, 1995 and 2003.

In March 2007, Argentina reached the top of the FIFA World Rankings for the first time.[7]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Kit history 2
    • Home 2.1
    • Away 2.2
    • Strip manufacturer 2.3
  • Managers 3
  • Results and fixtures 4
    • 2014 4.1
    • 2015 4.2
    • 2016 4.3
  • Players 5
    • Current squad 5.1
    • Recent call-ups 5.2
  • Competitive record 6
    • FIFA World Cup 6.1
    • FIFA Confederations Cup 6.2
    • South American Championship 6.3
    • Copa América 6.4
    • Olympics record 6.5
    • Pan American Games 6.6
  • Honours 7
    • Senior team 7.1
    • Youth and Olympic teams 7.2
  • Records and statistics 8
    • Most capped players 8.1
    • Top goalscorers 8.2
    • World Cup winning captains 8.3
    • Individual stats 8.4
  • Gallery 9
  • Notable matches 10
  • Rivalries 11
    • Brazil 11.1
    • England 11.2
    • Germany 11.3
    • Uruguay 11.4
  • See also 12
  • Notes 13
  • References 14
  • External links 15

History

The first match ever recorded by Argentina was against Uruguay.[1] The game was held in Montevideo on 16 May 1901 and Argentina won, 3–2. During the first years of its existence, the Argentina national team only played friendly matches against other South American teams. The reasons for this varied, including long travel times between countries and World War I.[10]

La Selección (national team), also known as the Albicelestes (sky blue and whites), has appeared in five World Cup finals, including the first final in 1930, which they lost, 4–2, to Uruguay. Argentina won in their next final in 1978, beating the Netherlands, 3–1. Argentina, led by Diego Maradona won again in 1986, a 3–2 victory over West Germany. Their most recent World Cup final was in 2014, which they lost, 1–0, to Germany. Previous to this their last World Cup final was in 1990, which they lost, 1–0, to Germany by a much disputed penalty. Argentina's World Cup winning managers are César Luis Menotti in 1978, and Carlos Bilardo in 1986.

Argentina has been very successful in the Copa América, winning it fourteen times and also winning the 'extra' South American Championships in 1941, 1945 and 1946. The team also won the FIFA Confederations Cup and the Kirin Cup, both in 1992, and an Argentina team (with only three players of over 23 years of age included in the squad) won the Olympics football tournaments in Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008.[11]

Argentina also won six of the 14 football competitions at the Pan American Games, winning in 1951, 1955, 1959, 1971, 1995 and 2003.

In March 2007, Argentina reached the top of the FIFA World Rankings for the first time.[12]

Kit history

Argentina has been wearing white and light blue in vertical stripes jersey, black shorts and white/black socks. The away kits usually are in dark blue tones, varying the colors of shorts and socks.

Nevertheless, Argentina wore other uniforms a few times. One of them was on 3 June 1919 in Rio de Janeiro playing the "Roberto Chery Cup" against Brazil. That time Argentina wore a light blue kit, similar to Uruguay.[13] The trophy was established by Brazilian Football Confederation for the benefit of Roberto Chery's relatives. Chery was Uruguay's substitute goalkeeper and died during the 1919 South American Championship after collapsing in a game against Chile.[14]

In the 1958 World Cup, Argentina wore the yellow IFK Malmo's jersey in the match against West Germany as the team didn't bring away uniforms to Sweden.[15]

Home

Away

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1958 [15]

Strip manufacturer

Manufacturer Period
Adidas 1973–1979
Le Coq Sportif 1980–1989
Adidas 1990–1998
Reebok 1999–2001
Adidas 2001–present

Managers

The first Argentina national team manager was Ángel Vázquez, appointed in 1924. Guillermo Stábile is the manager with the most matches coaching the team (127).[16] The complete list of managers is:[17][18]

Dates Name
1924–25 Ángel Vázquez
1927–28 José Lago Millán
1928–29 Francisco Olazar
1929–30 Francisco Olazar &
Juan J. Tramutola
1934 Felipe Pascucci
1934–37 Manuel Seoane
1937–39 Ángel Fernández Roca
1939–60 Guillermo Stábile
1960–61 Victorio Spinetto
1962–63 Juan Carlos Lorenzo
Dates Name
1963 Alejandro Galán
1963–64 Horacio Torres
1964–68 José María Minella
1968 Renato Cesarini
1968–69 Humberto Maschio
1969 Adolfo Pedernera
1969–72 Juan José Pizzuti
1972–74 Omar Sívori
1974 Vladislao Cap
1974–83 César Luis Menotti
1983–90 Carlos Bilardo
Dates Name
1990–94 Alfio Basile
1994–98 Daniel Passarella
1998–04 Marcelo Bielsa
2004–06 José Pékerman
2006–08 Alfio Basile
2008–10 Diego Maradona
2010–11 Sergio Batista
2011–14 Alejandro Sabella
2014– Gerardo Martino

[19]

Results and fixtures

The following are Argentina's results and fixtures for the last nine months, and the next six months.

      Win       Draw       Loss

2014


2015

2016

Players

Current squad

The following players are in the squad for the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification (CONMEBOL) games against Brazil on 12 November and Colombia on 17 November.[20]


Caps and goals updated as of October 13, 2015 after the match against Paraguay.
0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Sergio Romero (1987-02-22) 22 February 1987 68 0 Manchester United
12 1GK Nahuel Guzmán (1986-02-10) 10 February 1986 6 0 UANL
23 1GK Agustín Marchesín (1988-03-16) 16 March 1988 2 0 Santos Laguna
4 2DF Pablo Zabaleta (1985-01-16) 16 January 1985 54 0 Manchester City
15 2DF Martín Demichelis (1980-12-20) 20 December 1980 49 2 Manchester City
16 2DF Marcos Rojo (1990-03-20) 20 March 1990 39 2 Manchester United
2 2DF Ezequiel Garay (1986-10-10) 10 October 1986 32 0 Zenit St. Petersburg
17 2DF Nicolás Otamendi (1988-02-12) 12 February 1988 28 1 Manchester City
3 2DF Facundo Roncaglia (1987-02-10) 10 February 1987 9 0 Fiorentina
13 2DF Emmanuel Más (1989-01-15) 15 January 1989 4 0 San Lorenzo
24 2DF Ramiro Funes Mori (1991-03-05) 5 March 1991 3 0 Everton
14 3MF Javier Mascherano (captain) (1984-06-08) 8 June 1984 120 3 Barcelona
7 3MF Ángel Di María (1988-02-14) 14 February 1988 68 15 Paris Saint-Germain
19 3MF Éver Banega (1988-06-29) 29 June 1988 36 4 Sevilla
6 3MF Lucas Biglia (1986-01-30) 30 January 1986 35 0 Lazio
10 3MF Javier Pastore (1989-06-20) 20 June 1989 27 2 Paris Saint-Germain
8 3MF Enzo Pérez (1986-02-22) 22 February 1986 15 1 Valencia
20 3MF Érik Lamela (1992-03-04) 4 March 1992 14 1 Tottenham Hotspur
25 3MF Nicolás Gaitán (1988-02-23) 23 February 1988 11 2 Benfica
5 3MF Matías Kranevitter (1993-05-21) 21 May 1993 3 0 River Plate
18 4FW Carlos Tevez (1984-02-05) 5 February 1984 76 13 Boca Juniors
9 4FW Gonzalo Higuaín (1987-12-10) 10 December 1987 52 25 Napoli
22 4FW Ezequiel Lavezzi (1985-05-03) 3 May 1985 46 6 Paris Saint-Germain
21 4FW Ángel Correa (1995-03-09) 9 March 1995 3 1 Atlético Madrid
11 4FW Paulo Dybala (1993-11-15) 15 November 1993 1 0 Juventus

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Mariano Andújar (1983-07-30) 30 July 1983 11 0 Estudiantes 2015 Copa América
GK Gerónimo Rulli (1992-05-20) 20 May 1992 0 0 Real Sociedad v.  Ecuador, 31 March 2015
GK Willy Caballero (1981-09-28) 28 September 1981 0 0 Manchester City v.  Portugal, 18 November 2014
DF Milton Casco (1988-04-11) 11 April 1988 2 0 River Plate v.  Paraguay, 13 October 2015
DF Gonzalo Rodríguez (1984-10-04) 4 October 1984 7 1 Fiorentina v.  Mexico, 8 September 2015
DF Federico Fernández (1989-02-21) 21 February 1989 31 3 Swansea City 2015 Copa América preliminary squad
DF Lucas Orbán (1989-02-03) 3 February 1989 2 0 Valencia 2015 Copa América preliminary squad
DF Mateo Musacchio (1990-08-26) 26 August 1990 3 0 Villarreal v.  Ecuador, 31 March 2015
DF Cristian Ansaldi (1986-09-20) 20 September 1986 5 1 Genoa v.  Portugal, 18 November 2014
DF Federico Fazio (1987-03-17) 17 March 1987 3 0 Tottenham Hotspur v.  Portugal, 18 November 2014
DF Santiago Vergini (1988-08-03) 3 August 1988 3 0 Getafe v.  Portugal, 18 November 2014
DF Jonathan Silva (1994-06-29) 29 June 1994 2 0 Sporting v.  Portugal, 18 November 2014
MF Roberto Pereyra (1991-01-07) 7 January 1991 10 0 Juventus v.  Paraguay, 13 October 2015
MF Fernando Gago (1986-04-10) 10 April 1986 60 0 Boca Juniors v.  Mexico, 8 September 2015
MF Maxi Rodríguez (1981-01-02) 2 January 1981 57 16 Newell's Old Boys 2015 Copa América preliminary squad
MF Federico Mancuello (1989-03-26) 26 March 1989 2 1 Independiente 2015 Copa América preliminary squad
FW Sergio Agüero (1988-06-02) 2 June 1988 69 32 Manchester City v.  Paraguay, 13 October 2015 INJ
FW Lionel Messi (1987-06-24) 24 June 1987 105 49 Barcelona v.  Ecuador, 5 October 2015 INJ

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

     Gold

       Silver       Bronze  

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1930 Runners-up 2nd 5 4 0 0 18 9
1934 Round 1 9th 1 0 0 1 2 3
1938 Withdrew
1950
1954
1958 Group Stage 13th 3 1 0 2 5 10 4 3 0 1 10 2
1962 Group Stage 10th 3 1 1 1 2 3 2 2 0 0 11 3
1966 Quarter-Finals 5th 4 2 1 1 4 2 4 3 1 0 9 2
1970 Did Not Qualify 4 1 1 2 4 6
1974 Round 2 8th 6 1 2 3 9 12 4 3 1 0 9 2
1978 Champions 1st 7 5 1 1 15 4 Qualified as hosts
1982 Round 2 11th 5 2 0 3 8 7 Qualified as defending champions
1986 Champions 1st 7 6 1 0 14 5 6 4 1 1 12 6
1990 Runners-up 2nd 7 2 3(2*) 2 5 4 Qualified as defending champions
1994 Round of 16 10th 4 2 0 2 8 6 8 4 2 2 9 10
1998 Quarter-Finals 6th 5 3 1* 1 10 4 16 8 6 2 23 13
2002 Group Stage 18th 3 1 1 1 2 2 18 13 4 1 42 15
2006 Quarter-Finals 6th 5 3 2(1*) 0 11 3 18 10 4 4 29 17
2010 Quarter-Finals 5th 5 4 0 1 10 6 18 8 4 6 23 20
2014 Runners-Up 2nd 7 5 1* 1 8 4 16 9 5 2 35 15
2018 To Be Determined
2022
Total 2 Titles 16/20 77 42 14 21 131 84 118 68 29 21 216 111
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks. Darker color indicates win, normal color indicates lost.
**Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won. Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Squad
1992 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 7 1 Squad
1995 Runners-up 2nd 3 1 1 1 5 3 Squad
1997 Did Not Qualify
1999
2001
2003
2005 Runners-up 2nd 5 2 2 1 10 10 Squad
2009 Did Not Qualify
2013
2017
2021 TBD
Total 1 Title 3/10 10 5 3 2 22 14 -
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won. Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.

South American Championship

South American Championship
Year Round Position GP W D L GS GA
1916 Runners-up 2nd 3 1 2 0 7 2
1917 Runners-up 2nd 3 2 0 1 5 3
1919 Third Place 3rd 3 1 0 2 7 7
1920 Runners-up 2nd 3 1 2 0 4 2
1921 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 5 0
1922 Fourth Place 4th 4 2 0 2 6 3
1923 Runners-up 2nd 3 2 0 1 6 6
1924 Runners-up 2nd 3 1 2 0 2 0
1925 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 11 4
1926 Runners-up 2nd 4 2 1 1 14 3
1927 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 15 4
1929 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 9 1
1935 Runners-up 2nd 3 2 0 1 8 5
1937 Champions 1st 6 5 0 1 14 5
1939 Withdrew
1941 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 10 2
1942 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 21 6
1945 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 22 5
1946 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 17 3
1947 Champions 1st 7 6 1 0 28 4
1949 Withdrew
1953 Withdrew
1955 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 18 6
1956 Third Place 3rd 5 3 0 2 5 3
1957 Champions 1st 6 5 0 1 25 6
1959 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 19 5
1959 Runners-up 2nd 4 2 1 1 9 9
1963 Third Place 3rd 6 3 1 2 15 10
1967 Runners-up 2nd 5 4 0 1 12 3
Total 12 Titles 26/29 113 81 15 17 314 107

Copa América

Copa América
Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1975 Group Stage 5th 4 2 0 2 17 4
1979 Group Stage 8th 4 1 1 2 7 6
1983 Group Stage 6th 4 1 3 0 5 4
1987 Fourth Place 4th 4 1 1 2 5 4
1989 Third Place 3rd 7 2 3 2 2 4
1991 Champions 1st 7 6 1 0 16 6
1993 Champions 1st 6 2 4 0 6 4
1995 Quarter-Finals 5th 4 2 1 1 8 6
1997 Quarter-Finals 5th 4 1 2 1 4 3
1999 Quarter-Finals 8th 4 2 0 2 6 6
2001 Withdrew
2004 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 16 6
2007 Runners-up 2nd 6 5 0 1 16 6
2011 Quarter-Finals 7th 4 1 3 0 5 2
2015 Runners-up 2nd 6 3 3 0 10 3
2016 TBD
2019 TBD
Total 2 Titles 13/14 70 33 23 14 123 64

Olympics record

Olympics record
Year Round Position GP W D* L GF GA
1908 Did Not Enter
1912
1920
1924
1928 Silver Medal 2nd 5 3 1 1 25 7
1936 Did Not Participate
1948
1952
1956
1960 Quarter-Finals 7th 3 2 0 1 6 4
1964 Group Stage 10th 2 0 1 1 3 4
1968 Did Not Qualify
1972
1976
1980 Qualified and Withdrew
1984 Did Not Qualify
1988 Quarter-Finals 8th 4 1 1 2 4 5
1992 Did Not Qualify
1996 Silver Medal 2nd 6 3 2 1 13 6
2000 Did Not Qualify
2004 Gold Medal 1st 6 6 0 0 17 0
2008 Gold Medal 1st 6 6 0 0 11 2
2012 Did Not Qualify
2016 Qualified
Total 2 Gold Medals
2 Silver Medal
7/25 32 21 5 6 78 28

Football at the Summer Olympics has been an under-23 tournament since 1992. See Argentina Olympic football team.

Pan American Games

Pan American Games record
Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1951 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 16 2
1955 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 23 7
1959 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 20 4
1963 Runners-up 2nd 7 3 1 0 18 3
1967 Round 1 5th 3 1 1 1 7 3
1971 Champions 1st 5 4 1 0 7 2
1975 Third Place 3rd 3 2 1 0 9 1
1979 Third Place 3rd 4 2 2 0 3 0
1983 Round 1 5th 2 0 0 2 0 4
1987 Third Place 3rd 4 3 0 1 11 3
1991 Did not Qualify
1995 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 10 4
1999 Did not Qualify
2003 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 10 5
2007 Round 1 9th 3 0 2 1 1 3
2011 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 6 2
2015 Did not Enter
2019 TBD
Total 6 Titles 14/16 60 46 10 6 134 43

Honours

Senior team

Youth and Olympic teams

Records and statistics

Most capped players

Javier Zanetti is the most capped player in the history of Argentina with 145 caps.

As of October 8, 2015, the ten players with the most caps[22] for Argentina are:

Rank. Name Career Caps Goals
1 Javier Zanetti 1994–2011 145 5
2 Javier Mascherano 2003–present 120 3
3 Roberto Ayala 1994–2007 115 7
4 Diego Simeone 1988–2002 106 11
5 Lionel Messi 2005–present 105 49
6 Oscar Ruggeri 1983–1994 97 7
7 Diego Maradona 1977–1994 91 34
8 Ariel Ortega 1993–2010 87 17
9 Gabriel Batistuta 1991–2002 78 56
10 Juan Pablo Sorín 1996–2006 76 11

Top goalscorers

Gabriel Batistuta is the highest goalscorer in the history of Argentina with 56 goals.

As of September 8, 2015, the ten players with the most goals for Argentina are:

Rank. Player Career Goals Caps Avg/Game
1 Gabriel Batistuta 1991–2002 56 78 0.718
2 Lionel Messi 2005–present 49 105 0.472
3 Hernán Crespo 1995–2007 35 64 0.555
4 Diego Maradona 1977–1994 34 91 0.374
5 Sergio Agüero (list) 2006–present 32 68 0.478
6 Gonzalo Higuaín 2009–present 25 52 0.48
7 Luis Artime 1961–1967 24 25 0.960
8 Daniel Passarella 1976–1986 23 70 0.328
9 Leopoldo Luque 1975–1981 22 45 0.488
José Sanfilippo 1956–1962 22 29 0.759

World Cup winning captains

Year Name Caps Goals
1978 Daniel Passarella 70 23
1986 Diego Maradona 91 34

Individual stats

  • Most goals scored in all International competitions, including friendlies: 56 – Gabriel Batistuta, 1991–2002
  • Most goals scored in all International competitions (including 4 goals in FIFA Confederations Cup): 37 – Gabriel Batistuta, 1991–2001
  • Most goals scored in all International competitions (not including qualification and FIFA Confederations Cup goals): 23 – Gabriel Batistuta, 1991–2001
  • Most goals scored in International friendlies: 24 – Lionel Messi, 2005–
  • Most goals scored in one calendar year: 12 – Lionel Messi, 2012, Gabriel Batistuta, 1998
  • Most goals scored in one FIFA World Cup qualification: 10 – Lionel Messi, 2005–
  • Most goals scored in all FIFA World Cup qualification: 19 – Hernán Crespo, 1995–2007
  • Most goals scored in one FIFA World Cup Finals: 8 – Guillermo Stábile, 1930
  • Most goals scored in all FIFA World Cup Finals: 10 – Gabriel Batistuta, 1991–2001
  • Most goals scored in one FIFA Confederations Cup: 4 – Luciano Figueroa, 2004–2005
  • Most goals scored in all FIFA Confederations Cup: 4 – Gabriel Batistuta, 1991–2001, Luciano Figueroa, 2004–2005
  • Most goals scored in one Copa America era: 6 – Gabriel Batistuta, 1991–2001
  • Most goals scored in all Copa America era: 13 – Gabriel Batistuta, 1991–2001
  • Most goals scored in one South American Championship: 9 – Humberto Maschio, 1956–1957
  • Most goals scored in all South American Championship: 17 – Norberto Méndez, 1945–1956
  • Most goals scored in one Football Summer Olympics: 9 – Domingo Tarasconi, 1922–1929
  • Most goals scored in all Football Summer Olympics: 9 – Domingo Tarasconi, 1922–1929
  • Most goals scored in all U-20 International competitions, including friendlies: 14 – Lionel Messi, 2004–2005
  • Most goals scored in all U-20 International competitions: 11 – Lionel Messi, 2004–2005, Javier Saviola, 2001
  • Most goals scored in one FIFA U-20 World Cup Finals: 11 – Javier Saviola, 2001
  • Most goals scored in all FIFA U-20 World Cup Finals: 11 – Javier Saviola, 2001
  • Most goals scored in one South American Youth Football Championship: 9 – Luciano Galletti, 1999
  • Most Man of the Match awards in one FIFA World Cup: 4 Lionel Messi [11]
  • Most Man of the Match awards at FIFA World Cup Finals: 5 – Lionel Messi [12] [13]
  • Most Man of the Match awards in one Copa America: 4 – Lionel Messi [14]
  • Most Man of the Match awards in Copa America matches: 6 – Lionel Messi [15]
  • Oldest player that have ever scored a goal: 36 years and 7 months old in 2010 against Greece – Martín Palermo
  • Oldest player that have scored a goal at FIFA World Cup Finals: 36 years and 7 months old in 2010 against Greece – Martín Palermo
  • Oldest player that have scored a goal at South American Championship/Copa America:
  • Youngest player that have ever scored a goal: 18 years and 8 months old in 1979 against Scotland – Diego Maradona
  • Youngest player that have ever scored a goal at FIFA World Cup Finals: 18 years and 357 days old in 2006 against Serbia and Montenegro – Lionel Messi
  • Youngest player that have ever captained the team at FIFA World Cup Finals: 22 years and 363 days old in 2010 against Greece Lionel Messi [16]
  • Youngest player to ever reach 100 caps: 27 years and 362 days old in 2015 against Jamaica Lionel Messi [17]
  • Youngest player that have scored a goal at South American Championship/Copa America: 18 years and 10 months old in 1979 against Brazil – Diego Maradona
  • Player to have score against all 9 South American nations: Lionel Messi, against Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela
  • Players that have scored the most in a match at any competition: 5 – 1925 Manuel Seoane, 1941 Juan Marvezzi
  • Players that have scored the most in a match at International friendlies:
  • Players that have scored in all 3 matches in the group stage in one FIFA World Cup: Omar Orestes Corbatta in 1958 and Lionel Messi in 2014 [18]
  • Players that have scored the most in a match at FIFA World Cup: 3 – 1930 Guillermo Stábile, 1994 & 1998 Gabriel Batistuta, 2010 Gonzalo Higuaín
  • Players that have scored the most in a match at South American Championship/Copa America: 5 – 1925 Manuel Seoane, 1941 Juan Marvezzi
  • Players that have won the FIFA World Cup Golden Shoe: 8 – goals in 1930– Guillermo Stábile, 6 goals in 1978– Mario Kempes
  • Players that have won the Copa America era Golden Shoe: 4  goals in 1975– Gabriel Batistuta, 4 goals in 1995– Gabriel Batistuta
  • Players that have won the South American Championship Golden Shoe: 3  goals in 1921– Julio Libonatti, 4 goals in 1922– Julio Francia, 3 goals in 1923– Valdino Aguirre, 6 goals in 1925– Manuel Seoane, 7 goals in 1927– Alfredo Carricaberry & Segundo Luna, 4 goals in 1935– Herminio Masantonio, 5 goals in 1941– Juan Marvezzi, 7 goals in 1942– Herminio Masantonio & José Manuel Moreno, 6 goals in 1945– Norberto Méndez, 8 goals in 1955– Rodolfo Micheli, 9 goals in 1957– Humberto Maschio, 5 goals in 1959– José Sanfilippo, 5 goals in 1967– Luis Artime
  • Players that have won the Football Summer Olympics Golden Shoe: 9  goals in 1928– Domingo Tarasconi, 6 goals in 1996– Hernán Crespo, 8 goals in 2004– Carlos Tevez

Gallery

Notable matches

  • Argentina and Uruguay hold the record for the most international matches played between two countries.[1] The two teams have faced each other 198 times since 1901. The first match against Uruguay was the first official international match to be played outside the United Kingdom.[23]
  • Marcelo Trobbiani was a member of the Argentina World Cup squad in 1986, but he only managed two minutes of play in the entire tournament, he came on in the 88th minute of the World Cup Final against West Germany. This two minutes of football equalled the world record for the shortest World Cup career set by Tunisia's Khemais Labidi in 1978.
  • In the 2006 World Cup Leandro Cufré was given a red card and sent off after the end of the Quarter Final game with Germany for his part in the brawl after the match, even though he was a substitute and had not participated in the game itself. It is the only occasion of a player being sent off in a FIFA World Cup match after the final whistle. Four years earlier, in the 2002 World Cup, Claudio Caniggia was sent off for swearing at a match official from the substitute bench.

Rivalries

Brazil

Argentina have a long and fierce rivalry with their South American neighbours.

England

With a rivalry stemming from the 1966 World Cup and intensified by the Falklands War of 1982, Argentina and England have had numerous confrontations in World Cup tournaments. Perhaps the most notable was the quarter-final match in 1986, where Diego Maradona scored two goals against England.

Germany

Argentina have played Germany in three FIFA World Cup finals. In 2006 and 2010 the two teams played each other in two consecutive World Cup quarterfinals, where Argentina lost on penalties after a 1–1 draw in 2006 and lost again in 2010, this time with a 4–0 victory for Germany. They played each other for the third consecutive World Cup when they met at the 2014 World Cup final match, where they were defeated by 1–0. After the 2014 World Cup, they defeated Germany by 4–2 in a friendly match.

Uruguay

Argentina has a long-standing rivalry with their neighbors, that came into existence from the early South American Championships, the 1928 Summer Olympics and the first World Cup final, held in 1930.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Some versions stated that the team that faced Argentina was Albion FC based on the initial line-up had 9 players from that club. In fact, it was the first match disputed by an Uruguayan national team.[8][9]
  2. ^ Extra edition
  3. ^ a b Played between Argentina and Uruguay.
  4. ^ Played between Argentina and Brazil.

References

  1. ^ a b Pelayes, Héctor Darío (24 September 2010). "ARGENTINA-URUGUAY Matches 1902–2009". RSSSF. Retrieved 7 November 2010. 
  2. ^ "Football gold for Argentina". BBC News. 28 August 2004. Retrieved 25 April 2010. 
  3. ^ "– Argentina on". FIFA. Retrieved 7 June 2012. 
  4. ^ "– Tournaments". FIFA. Retrieved 7 June 2012. 
  5. ^ "Great Footballing Rivalries : Argentina vs. Uruguay « SportsKeeda". Sportskeeda.com. Retrieved 7 June 2012. 
  6. ^ Wetzel, Dan (1 July 2010). "War of words renews Argentina-Germany rivalry – FBINTL – Yahoo! Sports". G.sports.yahoo.com. Archived from the original on 9 July 2010. Retrieved 7 June 2012. 
  7. ^ "– Argentina first for first time". FIFA. Retrieved 7 June 2012. 
  8. ^ Historia del Fútbol Uruguayo" at Deportes en Uruguay""". Deportesenuruguay.eluruguayo.com. Retrieved 2014-06-23. 
  9. ^ Reasons for excluding or including full "A" internationals (1901–1910) at IFFHS""". Iffhs.de. Retrieved 2014-06-23. 
  10. ^ "los comienzos (1901–1930)", AFA official site". "AFA. Retrieved 2014-06-23. 
  11. ^ "Football gold for Argentina". BBC News. 28 August 2004. Retrieved 25 April 2010. 
  12. ^ "– Argentina first for first time". Fifa.com. Retrieved 2014-06-23. 
  13. ^ "Copa Roberto Chery, Brasil 3 – Argentina 3" at IFFHS
  14. ^ Publicado por Federico Mauccione Pérez (2004-02-26). El 3 de Julio de 1919, la Selección de Brasil vistió la camiseta de Peñarol", GloriosoMirasol.com""". Gloriosomirasolfm.blogspot.com.ar. Retrieved 2014-06-23. 
  15. ^ a b "En el placard: Argentina de amarillo 1958". Enunabaldosa.com. Retrieved 2014-06-23. 
  16. ^ "Los 40 nombres que dirigieron la Selección Nacional" on AFA website (1924–2006 period listed)
  17. ^ "De Olazar a Batista: 43 técnicos de la Selección Argentina", MDZ online.com, 1 Nov 2010
  18. ^ "Los 42 técnicos que tuvo la Selección", La Nación
  19. ^ Argentina national team archive at RSSSF
  20. ^ Los 25 de Argentina
  21. ^ "Copa Julio Roca at RSSSF". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 2014-06-23. 
  22. ^ http://www.fifa.com/mm/document/fifafacts/stats-centclub/52/00/59/centuryclub290715_neutral.pdf
  23. ^ Although Canada and the United States played two internationals in 1885 and 1886, neither match is considered official; Canada did not play an official international until 1904 and the USA did not play one until 1916.

External links

  • Official website
  • Argentina FIFA
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