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Apamea Myrlea

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Apamea Myrlea

Apamea Myrlea (; Ancient Greek: Απάμεια Μύρλεια) was an ancient city on the Sea of Marmara, in Bithynia, Anatolia; its ruins are a few kilometers south of Mudanya, Bursa Province in the Marmara Region of Turkey.

Name

To distinguish this city from the many others called Apamea,[1][2][3] the name Apamea Myrlea used here adds to the name (Apamea) it was given when rebuilt as an important city the name (Myrlea) it previously bore as a smaller town.[4] It was also referred to as Apamea Myrlēon (Apamea of Myrlea).[5]

History

The town was founded as a colony of the Colophonians and was called Μύρλεια (Myrleia or Myrlea). Philip V of Macedon took the town, as it appears, during his war against the king of Pergamon, and gave it to his ally, King Prusias I of Bithynia, who fortified and enlarged it – indeed almost rebuilt it[6] – around 202 BC, renaming it Ἀπάμεια (transribed as Apameia, Apamea, or Apamia), after his wife, Apama III.[2]

The place was on the south coast of the Gulf of Erdek, and northwest of Bursa, then called Prusa, for which it served as a port.[1]

The Romans made Apamea a colonia, apparently in the time of Augustus, or perhaps Julius Caesar, in view of the adjective "Iulia" that appear on its coins under Roman rule.[2] Its earlier coins were stamped Ἀπαμέων Μυρλεάνων, but in Roman times they bore the label C.I.C.A. (= Colonia Iulia Concordia Apamea).[7]

When Pliny the Younger was governor of Bithynia, he consulted Trajan about a claim by the colonia not to have its accounts of receipts and expenditures examined by the Roman governor.[2]

A passage of Ulpian shows use of the adjectival form of the name was Apamenus: "Apamena: est in Bithynia colonia Apamena.[2]

Bishopric

This Apamea in the Roman province of Bithynia became the seat of a Christian bishop in the 4th century and was at first a suffragan of Nicaea, but became an autocephalous archdiocese some time before the Fourth Council of Constantinople (Roman Catholic) in 869, at which its archbishop Paulus took part.[8][9]

No longer a residential bishopric, Apamea in Bithynia is today listed by the Catholic Church as a titular see.[10]

References

  1. ^ a b 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica
  2. ^ a b c d e (1854) Greek and Roman Geography Dictionary of"Apameia" in William Smith,
  3. ^ See also the disambiguation page Apamea
  4. ^ , entry "Ăpămēa"A Latin DictionaryCharlton T. Lewis, Charles Short,
  5. ^ , p. 83A Classical DictionaryWilliam Smith,
  6. ^ , p. 581A Classical DictionaryWilliam Smith,
  7. ^ Asia Minor Coins - ancient coins of Apamea
  8. ^ Michel Lequien, Oriens christianus in quatuor Patriarchatus digestus, Paris 1740, Vol. I, coll. 655-658
  9. ^ Gaetano Moroni, Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica, Vol. 2, p. 235
  10. ^ Annuario Pontificio 2013 (Libreria Editrice Vaticana 2013 ISBN 978-88-209-9070-1), p. 834

Further reading

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