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Aegospotami

Aegospotami (Αἰγὸς Ποταμοί) or Aegospotamos[1] (i.e. Goat Streams) is the ancient Greek name for a small river issuing into the Hellespont (Modern Turkish Çanakkale Boğazı), northeast of Sestos.[2]

At its mouth was the scene of the decisive battle in 405 BC by which Lysander destroyed the Athenian fleet, ending the Peloponnesian War.[3][4] The ancient Greek township of that name, whose existence is attested by coins of the 5th and 4th centuries,[5] and the river itself were located in ancient Thrace in the Chersonese.[1]

According to ancient sources including Pliny the Elder and Aristotle, in 467 BC a large meteorite landed near Aegospotami. He described it as brown in colour and the size of a wagon load; it was a local landmark for more than 500 years. A comet, tentatively identified as Halley's Comet, was reported at the time the meteorite landed. This is possibly the first European record of Halley's comet.[6][7]

Aegospotami is located on the Dardanelles, northeast of the modern Turkish town of Sütlüce, Dardanelles (the ancient Greek Galata, Thrace, modern Turkish Sütlüce, Gelibolu).[8]

References

  1. ^ a b Mish, Frederick C., Editor in Chief. “Aegospotami.” Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary. 9th ed. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster Inc., 1985. ISBN 0-87779-508-8, ISBN 0-87779-509-6 (indexed), and ISBN 0-87779-510-X (deluxe).
  2. ^ John Freely -The companion guide to Turkey 1993 "... a stream known to the Greeks as Aegospotami, or Goats' River, which empties into the strait at Ince Limam, ..."
  3. ^ Guralnik, David B., Editor in Chief. “Aegospotami.” Webster’s New World Dictionary of the American Language. Second College Edition. New York, NY: Prentice Hall Press, 1986. ISBN 0-671-41809-2 (indexed), ISBN 0-671-41807-6 (plain edge), ISBN 0-671-41811-4 (pbk.), and ISBN 0-671-47035-3 (LeatherKraft).
  4. ^ Donald Kagan The Fall of the Athenian Empire 1991 p386 "'4 A key to understanding the course of events is that Aegospotami was only a beach, a place without a proper harbor, a little to the east of the modern Turkish town called Sütlüce, or Galata in its Greek form, the ancient town of ..."
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