Adana Central railway station

Adana Central Station
TCDD
Station statistics
Address Uğur Mumcu Square
Adana, Turkey
Coordinates

37°00′13″N 35°19′09″E / 37.00361°N 35.31917°E / 37.00361; 35.31917Coordinates: 37°00′13″N 35°19′09″E / 37.00361°N 35.31917°E / 37.00361; 35.31917

Line(s) Adana-Mersin Regional
Central Anatolia Blue Train
Çukurova Blue Train
Erciyes Express
Friendship Train
Adana-İslahiye Regional
Euphrates Express
Connections Adana Metro
Structure type At-grade
Platforms 2
Tracks 4
Parking No
Other information
Opened 1886
Rebuilt 1912
Station code 6503
Owned by Turkish State Railways

Adana Central Station is a railway station in Adana and one of the major railway hubs in Turkey. The station is located at the Uğur Mumcu Square close to Vilayet Adana Metro station.

History

The first railway station in Adana was built in 1886 in the Kuruköprü area along the 67 km (42 mi) railway line that connected Adana to Mersin. In 1903, the Ottoman Government contracted Istanbul-Baghdad section of the Berlin-Baghdad Railway project to Germany. In 1911, the Yenice-Adana section of the Mersin-Adana railway line was merged with the Berlin-Baghdad railway project. The status of the Adana railway station was raised to a major station with the expected increase in volume. A larger station building and maintenance shops were needed to be built, but the existing train station was not suitable for expansion. So the train station in the Kuruköprü area was abandoned and the construction of a new train station was started in 1911 on farmland north of the city. The construction of the new railway station was completed in September 1912,[1] covering an area of 45 hectares. It contained a station building, staff residences, maintenance shops and a foundry.[2]

Architecture

The station building is built in the First National Architectural Style. It is a 3-storey structure with wide eaves and a triangular roof and has a U-plan in which the open area faces the square. The middle section, which connects to the square through three sharp arch gates, is the main hall with a high ceiling and includes the waiting room, ticket offices and the information desk. The middle section also splits into three areas. The two areas on the right side of the middle section comprise two floors. Above the area on the left side, there is a cafe which is entered from Platform I. Below the cafe, there are the ticket offices and the check room.

There are administrative offices at the north part of the east and the west wing of the building, facing platform I. The offices at the west wing are designated for the station manager and the assistant, and the ones on the east wing are designated for security and other services. On the upper floor, there are six residences of different sizes. The residences on the wings are larger than the residences above the main hall. The residences above the main hall are accessed from the stairs at the wings.


The main hall, which is two floors high is spacious. The four-piece window sets, facing Platform I at the upper section of the north walls, provide plenty of light to the hall. The bands that are covered with geometric forms, stretching in east-west direction on the ceiling, also add quality to the space. The light shining from the roof to the stairwells on the both wings is a unique feature. The eaves surrounding the roof on the upper portion of the wings and the twin window sets beneath, the wide eaves extending all along above the arch gates at the middle section of the elegantly designed building front show that horizontal elements are dominant in the architecture. The ground and the first floor windows in front of the wings are in vertical frame, forming a more stable image. The elements that surround the windows have a perpendicular effect and finish with 3-slice twin blind arches which further increases perpendicularity. Thin mouldings beneath the twin window sets of the second floor which wrap around the entire building, and hewn stones which overflow from the surface at the corners and the wood supports of the wide eaves, are elements that build the architectural identity of the building's frontage.

The north side of the building facing platform I is two-storey. Eaves and the upper floor windows are identical to the front side. Also like the front side, three-slice twin blind arches are placed above the doors and the windows of the offices that are at the same level with platform I. The other features of this side is the two four-piece windows that provide view to the main lobby downstairs. Wide eaves that are added to this side after prevents it to be perceived as a whole.

The west and the east sides of the building are designed with a simpler perception than the front side. The features that are formed with slice arches are not used at these sides.

Ornaments of the building are the two large rectangular-shaped faience panels on both sides of the main entrance, the faiences that placed in a niche at the section of the west and east wings that face the main entrance and the geometric shaped ornaments at the bottom surface of the eaves.

Service

Previous Turkish State Railways Next
Şakirpaşa
Toward Mersin
Adana-Mersin Regional
Terminus
Şakirpaşa
Toward Mersin
Iskenderun-Mersin Regional
Kiremithane
Toward İskenderun
Yenice
Toward İstanbul
Central Anatolia Blue Train
Terminus
Yenice
Toward Ankara
Çukurova Blue Train
Terminus
Şakirpaşa
Toward Kayseri
Erciyes Express
Terminus
Mersin
Terminus
Friendship Train
İslahiye
Toward Aleppo
Terminus
Adana-İslahiye Regional
İncirlik
Toward İslahiye
Terminus
Euphrates Express
İncirlik
Toward Elazığ

References

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