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Across the Wide Missouri (film)

Across the Wide Missouri
Theatrical release poster
Directed by William A. Wellman
Produced by Robert Sisk
Screenplay by Talbot Jennings
Story by Frank Cavett
Based on Across the Wide Missouri
1947 novel 
by Bernard DeVoto
Starring Clark Gable
John Hodiak
Ricardo Montalbán
James Whitmore
María Elena Marqués
Narrated by Howard Keel
Music by David Raksin
Cinematography William Mellor
Edited by John Dunning
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release dates
  • 1951 (1951)
Running time
78 minutes
Country United States
Language English, Chinuk Wawa
Budget $2,220,000[1]
Box office $4,601,000[1]

Across the Wide Missouri is a 1951 American Technicolor film based on historian Bernard DeVoto's book, Across the Wide Missouri. The film dramatizes an account of several fur traders and their interaction with the Native Americans.

The film was directed by William A. Wellman and starred Clark Gable as cunning trapper Flint Mitchell, Ricardo Montalbán as Blackfoot Iron Shirt, John Hodiak as Brecan, María Elena Marqués as Kamiah, a Blackfoot chief's daughter Mitchell marries and later falls in love with, J. Carrol Naish as Nez Perce Looking Glass, and Adolphe Menjou as Pierre. Howard Keel, as Mitchell's son, "Chip Mitchell" narrates.

Contents

  • Plot 1
  • Cast 2
  • Production 3
  • Music 4
  • Reception 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Plot

Clark Gable and María Elena Marqués in a screenshot of the film.

In the 1830s in the beaver-rich Blackfoot territory, buying horses and recruiting trappers, despite protests from his Scottish friend and former trading partner, Brecan (John Hodiak), who lives among the Blackfoot and warns him that the land belongs to them. Flint outbids Brecan for Kamiah (María Elena Marqués), the granddaughter of Blackfoot medicine man Bear Ghost and adopted daughter of a Nez Perce chief, Looking Glass (J. Carrol Naish). Brecan wants to return her to the Blackfoot, to promote peace between the tribes, while Flint wants to marry Kamiah and ensure the brigade's safety.

Pierre (Adolphe Menjou), a French Canadian trapper, and Captain Humberstone Lyon (Alan Napier), another Scotsman, who fought in the Battle of Waterloo, join Flint on the dangerous expedition. Kamiah successfully guides Flint and his men on their trek through the high passes filled with crippling snow drifts and delivers them to the Blackfoot territory, where they build a stockade. Flint narrowly escapes capture and death by Ironshirt (Ricardo Montalban), a young Blackfoot prince and war chief, who kills Baptiste DuNord, one of Flint's best trappers. Ironshirt steals the brigade's horses, but Flint impresses Bear Ghost (Jack Holt), who orders them returned.

Though he marries Kamiah for reasons other than love, and cannot speak her language, Flint falls in love with her. As Flint and Kamiah grow closer, Flint and Bear Ghost become good friends. Bear Ghost prevents Ironshirt from harming Flint and his men, but catastrophe strikes when Roy DuNord, another of Flint's men, kills Bear Ghost to avenge his brother's death. Although Brecan kills Roy, and Flint sinks into a grieving depression over the death of Bear Ghost, Ironshirt succeeds Bear Ghost as chief and resumes his campaign to drive the white trappers out of his country.

In the spring, Kamiah gives birth to a boy, Chip. On the way to Rendezvous, the brigade is attacked by a large war party under Ironshirt and Kamiah is killed. With Chip strapped to its back, Kamiah's horse bolts during the attack and is chased by Ironshirt, intent on killing the boy. Flint manages to kill Ironshirt, however, and rescue his son. As the years pass, Flint takes Chip to live in the Blackfoot camp, where, Flint believes, Kamiah would have wanted him. Although Flint intends to have the boy formally educated in the East, Chip persuades him year after year to postpone his schooling, learning the ways of the mountains from his father.

Cast

Production

During filming, Ricardo Montalbán was reportedly thrown off a horse, knocked out, and walked on by another horse, leaving him with a spinal injury. This injury recurred in 1993, which forced him into a wheelchair.[2][3][4]

The film was shot entirely on location in the Rocky Mountains, mostly at altitudes between 9,000 and 14,000 feet, north of Durango, Colorado near Purgatory and Molas Pass, the main location sites.[5]

Music

The score for the film was composed and conducted by David Raksin and incorporated the song "Oh Shenandoah" in its main title and end title. Additional music was composed and/or adapted (from Raksin's material) by Al Sendrey, and conducted by Johnny Green.[6]

  • Across The Wide Missouri

The complete score was issued on CD in 2009, on Film Score Monthly records.

Reception

According to MGM records the film earned $2,789,00 in the US and Canada and $1,812,00 elsewhere, resulting in a profit of $635,000.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c .
  2. ^ Brennan, Sandra: [1] All Movie Guide, Ricardo Montalban
  3. ^ Mahalo Answers: Ricardo Montalban
  4. ^
  5. ^ http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=2193&category=Notes
  6. ^

External links


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