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Accra Sports Stadium

Ohene Djan Stadium
Location Accra, Ghana
Capacity 40,000[1]
Surface Grass
Construction
Opened 1960
Renovated 2007
Architect Alexander Georgiev Barov
Tenants
Great Olympics
Hearts of Oak

The Accra Sports Stadium, officially named the Ohene Djan Stadium is a multi-use, 40,000[1] all-seater stadium in Accra.[2] Ghana, mostly used for association football matches.

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • See also 2
  • Notes and references 3
  • External links 4

Overview

Originally known as the Accra Sports Stadium, the stadium was renamed after Ohene Djan, the country's first Director of Sports, in 2004. Its renaming was quite controversial and opposed by many in Accra's community.[3] There has been ongoing controversy about the name of the stadium. On June 16, 2011, the name 'Ohene Djan Stadium' on the stadium building was changed to 'Accra Sports Stadium' without any official announcement.[4] It has since been reverted.

As a designated venue of some of the 2008 African Cup of Nations matches, the stadium was rebuilt, upgraded and modernized to meet FIFA standards. Work on the stadium was completed in October 2007. It was inaugurated with a four-nations tournament that Ghana won (the Zenith Cup).

The stadium is also the home of one of Africa's most popular clubs, Hearts of Oak as well as Great Olympics, but Ghana's national team matches are sometimes played there.

During the 2000 African Cup of Nations in Ghana and Nigeria, the stadium hosted 9 matches,[5] and was also the venue of the 1978 final.

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b "Ohene Djan Stadium will last "forever"- Micheletti". ghananewsagency.org. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  2. ^ www.worldstadiums.com
  3. ^ Ghanaian Chronicle (28 April 2005). "Ohene Djan Did Not Warrant Honour - Adjin Tettey". Sports news (Ghana Home Page). Retrieved 2007-04-06. 
  4. ^ "Ohene Djan Stadium renamed Accra Sports Stadium". Ghana Home Page. 2011-06-17. Retrieved 2011-06-19. 
  5. ^ "Accra National Stadium". Cup of Nations Venue Guide (BBC). Retrieved 2007-04-06. 

External links

  • Ghana-pedia webpage - Ohene Djan Sports Stadium
  • New Work-in-Progress Photos - October 2007
  • Photo at worldstadiums.com
  • Photos at fussballtempel.net
  • Stadium design Moreno Marrazzo

Preceded by
Addis Ababa Stadium
Addis Ababa
African Cup of Nations
Final Venue

1978
Succeeded by
National Stadium
Lagos
Preceded by
Cairo International Stadium
Cairo
African Cup of Nations
Final Venue

2008
Succeeded by
Estádio Cidade Universitária
Luanda
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