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2160p

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2160p

2160p is an alternative name for 4K UHD, a resolution supported by UHDTV products and which offers four times the definition of 1080p.[1] The number 2160 stands for a display resolution which has 2160 pixels along the shortest side, while the letter p stands for progressive scan or non-interlaced. In a progressive image, the lines of resolution of the image go from the top of the screen to the bottom.[2] The only planned higher definition format for television is 8K UHD.[3]

Overview

2160p or 4K UHD is 3840×2160 (8.3 megapixels in the 16:9 aspect ratio) and is one of the two resolutions of Ultra-high-definition television.[4][5][6][7]

History

  • Philips has made a 3DTV with a native resolution of 4K UHD.[8]
  • In June 2012, Toshiba launched the world's first 3D TV without glasses with 9 parallax images. The images pass through special lenticular lenses to deliver 3D effect without glasses on a 55" Toshiba Regza RZ1.[9] However, because it delivers 9 parallax images at the same time, the 3D image will only be seen as HD 720p (1280x720), since 3840x2160 = 9x1280x720.
  • Sony plans to launch a 4K UHDTV in December 2012 and more in 2013- 2020 along with 8K UHDTV.
  • The Samsung Galaxy Note 3(only Snapdragon 800 version) shoots 2160p video at 30fps.
  • On June 12, 2014, the 2014 FIFA World Cup became the first ever to be shot in 4K UHD, thanks to FIFA's partnership with Sony.

See also

External links

  • Westinghouse introduces Quad HDTV set
  • Eyes-on: Samsung's 82-inch QuadHD & 52-inch Ultra Slim LCDs

References

  1. ^ Henning, W (2006-09-11). "Bye-Bye 1080P – Hello 2160P?". Neoseeker. Retrieved 2009-10-16. 
  2. ^ MATTHEW BRAGA. "The Road to 2160p: How 4K UltraHD Will Get into Your Home". Tested. Retrieved February 12, 2014. 
  3. ^ Robert Silva. "8K Resolution - Definition and Explanation of 8K Video Resolution". About.com. Retrieved February 12, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Ultra High Definition Television: Threshold of a new age". ITU. 2012-05-24. Retrieved 2012-08-18. 
  5. ^ "Samsung Says Phooey to 1080p, Goes 4x Better with Quad HD". 
  6. ^ "Samsung Shows OLED and Quad-HD TVs at CES". 
  7. ^ "Beyond HD". Broadcast Engineering. 2010-11-01. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  8. ^ Fermoso, J (2008-10-01). "Gadget Lab Hardware News and Reviews Philips’ 3D HDTV Might Destroy Space-Time Continuum, Wallets". Condé Nast Digital. Retrieved 2010-03-15. 
  9. ^ "Toshiba Regza RZ1, world’s first glasses-free 3D TV with Quad FHD display". June 20, 2012. 


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