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2004 African Cup of Nations Final

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2004 African Cup of Nations Final

2004 Africa Cup of Nations Final
Event 2004 Africa Cup of Nations
Date 14 February 2004
Venue Stade 7 Novembre, Radès
Referee Falla N'Doye (Senegal)
Attendance 65,000

The 2004 African Cup of Nations Final was a Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Tunisia won the title for the first time by beating Morocco 2–1.[1][2]

Match details

Details

14 February 2004
14:30
Tunisia  2 – 1  Morocco
Santos Goal 5'
Jaziri Goal 52'
Report Mokhtari Goal 38'
Stade 7 Novembre, Radès
Attendance: 65,000
Referee: Falla N'Doye (Senegal)
Tunisia
Morocco
GK 1 Ali Boumnijel
DF 3 Karim Haggui
DF 6 Hatem Trabelsi
DF 15 Radhi Jaïdi
DF 20 José Clayton
MF 8 Mehdi Nafti Substituted off 46'
MF 13 Riadh Bouazizi
MF 14 Adel Chedli
MF 18 Selim Ben Achour Substituted off 57'
FW 5 Ziad Jaziri Booked Substituted off 70'
FW 11 Francileudo Santos
Substitutions:
MF 12 Jawhar Mnari Substituted in 46'
MF 10 Kaies Ghodhbane Substituted in 57'
FW 7 Imed Mhedhebi Substituted in 70'
Manager:
Roger Lemerre
GK 1 Khalid Fouhami
DF 2 Hoalid Regragui Booked
DF 3 Akram Roumani Booked Substituted off 70'
DF 4 Abdeslam Ouaddou
DF 5 Talal El Karkouri
DF 6 Noureddine Naybet Booked
MF 8 Abdelkarim Kissi Booked
MF 15 Youssef Safri Substituted off 63'
FW 16 Youssef Mokhtari
FW 17 Marouane Chamakh
FW 20 Youssef Hadji Substituted off 86'
Substitutions:
FW 11 Moha Substituted in 63'
FW 7 Jaouad Zaïri Substituted in 70'
FW 9 Nabil Baha Substituted in 86'
Manager:
Badou Ezzaki
Assistant referees:
Ali Tomusange (Uganda)
Brighton Mudzamiri (Zimbabwe)

References

  1. ^ "Jaziri pounces to secure first title for Tunisia". Guardian UK. 15 February 2004. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  2. ^ "Tunisia win Cup of Nations". BBC Sport. 15 February 2004. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
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