Saone-Et-Loire

Saône-et-Loire
Department
Prefecture building of the Saône-et-Loire department, in Mâcon

Coat of arms

Location of Saône-et-Loire in France

Coordinates: 46°40′N 04°42′E / 46.667°N 4.700°E / 46.667; 4.700Coordinates: 46°40′N 04°42′E / 46.667°N 4.700°E / 46.667; 4.700

Country France
Region Bourgogne
Prefecture Mâcon
Subprefectures Autun
Chalon-sur-Saône
Charolles
Louhans
Government
 • President of the General Council Arnaud Montebourg
Area1
 • Total 8,575 km2 (3,311 sq mi)
Population (2010)
 • Total 555,663
 • Rank 47th
 • Density 65/km2 (170/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Department number 71
Arrondissements 5
Cantons 57
Communes 573
^1 French Land Register data, which exclude estuaries, and lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km2

Saône-et-Loire (French pronunciation: ​[soː.n‿e.lwaʁ]; Arpitan: Sona-et-Lêre) is a French department, named after the Saône and the Loire rivers between which it lies.

History

When it was formed during the French Revolution, as of March 4, 1790 in fulfillment of the law of December 22, 1789, the new department combined parts of the provinces of southern Burgundy and Bresse, uniting lands that had no previous common history nor political unity and which have no true geographical unity. Thus its history is that of Burgundy, and is especially to be found in the local histories of Autun, Mâcon, Chalon-sur-Saône, Charolles and Louhans.

Geography

Saône-et-Loire is the seventh largest department of France and the most densely populated in the region of Bourgogne. In the east the department is composed of the hills of the Autunois, the region around Autun, of the Charollais and of the Mâconnais. In the centre it is traversed from north to south by the Saône in its wide plain; the Saône is a tributary of the River Rhône that joins it at Lyon and thus is connected to the Mediterranean Sea. The Loire makes its way in the opposite direction, draining into the Atlantic Ocean. The Canal du Centre links the Saône to the Loire between Chalon-sur-Saône and Digoin, thereby linking the Mediterranean Sea to the Atlantic ocean. In the east the department occupies the northern part of the plain of Bresse. In the west its industrial heart is in Le Creusot and Montceau-les-Mines.

Tourism

Touristic sites :

See also

External links

  • (French) General Council website
  • (French) Prefecture website
  • (English) DMOZ
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