Rab-shakeh

Rabshakeh, also Rab-shakeh and Rabsaces (Akkadian language Rabshaqe; Hebrew: רַבְשָׁקֵה, Modern Ravshake Tiberian Raḇšāqē; Greek: Ραψακης Rapsakēs; Latin: Rabsaces) Assyrian Neo-Aramaic: (ܪܵܒܫܵܩܹܐ) This name meaning chief of the princes was given to the chief cup-bearer or the vizier of the Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian royal courts in ancient Mesopotamia, and revived by the Assyrians as a military rank during World War I.

The Bible mentions it for one of Sennacherib's messengers to Hezekiah. The speech he delivered, in the Hebrew language, in the hearing of all the people, as he stood near the wall on the north side of the city, is quoted in 2 Kings 18:27–37 and Isaiah 36:12–20: Template:Cquote

He and the other envoys returned to their master and reported that Hezekiah and his people were obdurate, and would not submit.

Rabshakeh is also the title of a novel by J Francis Hudson (Lion Publishing 1992). It concerns the life of King Saul, as seen through the eyes of his Amalekite cup-bearer.

Rabshakeh's speech

II Kings 18:

Rabshakeh starts to speak: Template:Cquote

Then Joah, Shebnah and Eliakim, ministers of Hezekiah ask him to talk in Aramaic and not in Judean (Hebrew): Template:Cquote

Then Rabshakeh answers to them: Template:Cquote

And he continues: Template:Cquote

Notes

See also

Template:Eastons

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