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Management system

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Management system

A management system is the framework of

  • International Organization for Standardization (2001) Guidelines for the justification and development of management system standards. International Standard ISO Guide 72, Geneva, Switzerland.
  • International Organization for Standardization (1996) Environmental Management Systems-Specifications with Guidance for Use. International Standard ISO 14001, Geneva, Switzerland.
  • International Organization for Standardization (2004) Environmental Management Systems-Specifications with Guidance for Use. International Standard ISO 14001, Geneva, Switzerland.
  • Commission for Environmental Cooperation (2000): “Improving Environmental Performance and Compliance: 10 Elements of Effective Environmental Management Systems.” Report.
  • British Standards Institution (1996): Occupational Health & Safety Management Systems; BS 8800:1996. 389 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 4AL, United Kingdom.
  • British Standards Institution (1999): Occupational health & safety management systems - Specification; BS OHSAS 18001:1999. 389 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 4AL, United Kingdom.
  • International Organization for Standardization (2000) Quality Systems - Model for Quality Assurance in Design, Development, Production, Installation and Servicing. International Standard ISO 9001:2000(E), Geneva, Switzerland.
  • United States Department of Labor, Occupational Health and Safety Administration (1989); "Safety and Health Program Management Guidelines." Federal Register, January 26, 1989.
  • United States Environmental Protection Agency (2001): “Integrated Environmental Management Systems: Implementation Guide.” Report written by ABT Associates for the USEPA’s Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Design for the Environment Program; Economics, Exposure, and Technology Division. Washington, DC.
  • United States Department of Labor, Occupational Health and Safety Administration (1988); Voluntary Protection Programs to Supplement Enforcement and to Provide Safe and Healthful Working Conditions." Federal Register, July 12, 1988; 53:133 pp. 26339–26348.
  • Redinger C.F. (2002): Implementation Guidance Manual; For the ILO Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems ILO-OSH 2001. International Labour Office, Geneva.
  • Business Publication on Management Systems (MS Magazine)

Further reading

  1. ^ Anderson, Chris. How to Build Effective Management Systems, Bizmanualz, January 26, 2005.
  2. ^ management

References

See also

[2]

  • ISO 9001 Quality Management,
  • ISO 14001 Environmental Management,
  • ILO-OSH Occupational Safety & Health Management Systems,
  • ISO/IEC 27001 Information Security Management,
  • SA8000 Social Accountability.

Examples of management system standards include:

Also as in the aforementioned management system, an occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) enables an organization to control its occupational health and safety risks and to improve its performance by means of continuous improvement.

For instance, an environmental management system enables organizations to improve their environmental performance through a process of continuous improvement. An oversimplification is "Plan, Do, Check, Act". A more complete system would include accountability (an assignment of personal responsibility) and a schedule for activities to be completed, as well as auditing tools to implement corrective actions in addition to scheduled activities, creating an upward spiral of continuous improvement.

[1]

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