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Hadiyya language

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Hadiyya language

Hadiyya
Native to Ethiopia
Region Gurage, Hadiya, Kembata regions, area around Hosaena
Native speakers
250,000  (2007 census)[1]
Dialects
Hadiyya
Soro
Ethiopic, Latin
Language codes
ISO 639-3 hdy
Glottolog hadi1240[2]

Hadiyya (sometimes Hadiyigna or Adiya) is the Afro-Asiatic language of the Hadiya people of Ethiopia. Most speakers live in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People's Region in the Hadiya Zone around the town Hosaena.[3]

The language is a Highland East Cushitic language. The Libido language, located just to the north, is very similar lexically, but has significant morphological differences. Hadiyya is interesting in that it has a set of complex consonant phonemes consisting of a glottal stop and a sonorant: /ʔr/, /ʔj/, /ʔw/, /ʔl/.

The New Testament has been translated in Hadiyya, published by the Bible Society of Ethiopia in 1993. It was originally done using the traditional Ethiopic syllabary. A later printing used the Latin alphabet.

The Ethnologue quotes the 1998 census saying the number of speakers is 923,958, with 595,107 monolinguals. The 2007 census gives the number of speakers as a drastically reduced 253,894.

Notes

  1. ^ Ethiopia 2007 Census
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Hadiyya". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Raymond G. Gordon, Jr, ed. 2005. Ethnologue: Languages of the World. 15th edition. Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics.

References

  • Korhonen, Elsa, Mirja Saksa, and Ronald J. Sim. 1986. "A dialect study of Kambaata-Hadiyya (Ethiopia) [part 1]." Afrikanistische Arbeitspapiere 5: 5-41.
  • Korhonen, Elsa, Mirja Saksa, and Ronald J. Sim. 1986. "A dialect study of Kambaata-Hadiyya (Ethiopia), part 2: Appendices." Afrikanistische Arbeitspapiere 6: 71-121.
  • Leslau, Wolf. 1985. The liquid l in Hadiyya and West Gurage. Mélanges linguistiques offerts à Maxime Rodinson (Comptes rendus du groupe linguistique d’études chamito-sémitiques supplément 12), 231-238. Paris: Librairie Orientaliste Paul Geuthner.
  • Perrett, Denise Lesley. 1993. The switch-reference phenomena in Hadiyya: A labelled deductive system perspective, M.A. thesis, Univ. of London.
  • Perrett, Denise Lesley. 2000. The dynamics of tense construal in Hadiyya, Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of London.
  • Plazikowsky-Brauner, Herma. 1960. Die Hadiya-Sprache. Rassegna di Studi Etiopici 16.38-76.
  • Plazikowsky-Brauner, Herma. 1961. Texte der Hadiya-Sprache. Rassegna di Studi Etiopici 17.83-115.
  • Plazikowsky-Brauner, Herma. 1964. Wörterbuch der Hadiya-Sprache. Rassegna di Studi Etiopici 20.133-182.
  • Sim, Ronald J. 1985. "The morphological structure of some main verb forms in Hadiyya." In The verb morphophonemics of five highland east Cushitic languages, including Burji, 10-43. Afrikanistische Arbeitspapiere, 2. Cologne: Institut für Afrikanistik.
  • Sim, Ronald J. 1988. "Violations of the two-consonant constraint in Hadiyya." African Languages and Cultures 1: 77-90.
  • Sim, Ronald J. 1989. Predicate conjoining in Hadiyya: a head-driven PS grammar. Ph.D. thesis. University of Edinburgh.
  • Stinson, D. Lloyd. 1976. Hadiyya. In Language in Ethiopia, M. L. Bender et al., eds., 148-154. London: Oxford University Press.
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